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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
History

History
We had a maple kitchen table that was very nice, but not the style we wanted for our house.
After I made the mahogany coffee table, I was feeling confident to tackle something larger.

Kristin and I enrolled in a "work completion lab" at the community college.
I looked through several plans. I really wanted to make one with curved stretchers and a top that was held on by massive sliding dovetails. (I still want to make it). We decided it was beyond our skills.

So we picked a basic Stickley trestle dining table, but scaled it down for our living room. It features a massive top and through/keyed tenons.

I spent one day running to Bonhoff Lumber to buy the rought 8/4 1/4sawn oak material.

Here it is so far:


Challenges
  1. Chopping the through tenons by hand as the thickness of the legs prohibited the use of the mortiser. The chips were flyin.
  2. Keyed tenons
  3. Learned to resaw: Veneered quartersawn oak to two faces of each leg so that all faces are quartersawn.
  4. Jointing huge pieces

To come
  1. Sand top
  2. Ease edges and corners of top
  3. Sand tenon keys
    #Apply Finish
  4. Attach top

We stopped working on it because we needed to find the right finish. (Plus, see all my other excuses on prior post). I have been experimenting with a billion different stains. I also acquired ammonia (the real stuff) from a parent in my class who runs a blueprint shop. I have not had time to fume some samples. I am also not sure what type of clear finish to put over the whole thing. Shellac is out due to the sloshing beer/wine problem. Any advice? (Yes I have seent the twelve step process).

I will post some of my 50 stain samples sometime.

By the way: I have a new policy. No starting a project until a finish schedule is in place.
 

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Registered
Joined
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114 Posts
History

History
We had a maple kitchen table that was very nice, but not the style we wanted for our house.
After I made the mahogany coffee table, I was feeling confident to tackle something larger.

Kristin and I enrolled in a "work completion lab" at the community college.
I looked through several plans. I really wanted to make one with curved stretchers and a top that was held on by massive sliding dovetails. (I still want to make it). We decided it was beyond our skills.

So we picked a basic Stickley trestle dining table, but scaled it down for our living room. It features a massive top and through/keyed tenons.

I spent one day running to Bonhoff Lumber to buy the rought 8/4 1/4sawn oak material.

Here it is so far:


Challenges
  1. Chopping the through tenons by hand as the thickness of the legs prohibited the use of the mortiser. The chips were flyin.
  2. Keyed tenons
  3. Learned to resaw: Veneered quartersawn oak to two faces of each leg so that all faces are quartersawn.
  4. Jointing huge pieces

To come
  1. Sand top
  2. Ease edges and corners of top
  3. Sand tenon keys
    #Apply Finish
  4. Attach top

We stopped working on it because we needed to find the right finish. (Plus, see all my other excuses on prior post). I have been experimenting with a billion different stains. I also acquired ammonia (the real stuff) from a parent in my class who runs a blueprint shop. I have not had time to fume some samples. I am also not sure what type of clear finish to put over the whole thing. Shellac is out due to the sloshing beer/wine problem. Any advice? (Yes I have seent the twelve step process).

I will post some of my 50 stain samples sometime.

By the way: I have a new policy. No starting a project until a finish schedule is in place.
Looks Nice.
 

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Registered
Joined
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35,383 Posts
History

History
We had a maple kitchen table that was very nice, but not the style we wanted for our house.
After I made the mahogany coffee table, I was feeling confident to tackle something larger.

Kristin and I enrolled in a "work completion lab" at the community college.
I looked through several plans. I really wanted to make one with curved stretchers and a top that was held on by massive sliding dovetails. (I still want to make it). We decided it was beyond our skills.

So we picked a basic Stickley trestle dining table, but scaled it down for our living room. It features a massive top and through/keyed tenons.

I spent one day running to Bonhoff Lumber to buy the rought 8/4 1/4sawn oak material.

Here it is so far:


Challenges
  1. Chopping the through tenons by hand as the thickness of the legs prohibited the use of the mortiser. The chips were flyin.
  2. Keyed tenons
  3. Learned to resaw: Veneered quartersawn oak to two faces of each leg so that all faces are quartersawn.
  4. Jointing huge pieces

To come
  1. Sand top
  2. Ease edges and corners of top
  3. Sand tenon keys
    #Apply Finish
  4. Attach top

We stopped working on it because we needed to find the right finish. (Plus, see all my other excuses on prior post). I have been experimenting with a billion different stains. I also acquired ammonia (the real stuff) from a parent in my class who runs a blueprint shop. I have not had time to fume some samples. I am also not sure what type of clear finish to put over the whole thing. Shellac is out due to the sloshing beer/wine problem. Any advice? (Yes I have seent the twelve step process).

I will post some of my 50 stain samples sometime.

By the way: I have a new policy. No starting a project until a finish schedule is in place.
Great design.
 

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56,015 Posts
History

History
We had a maple kitchen table that was very nice, but not the style we wanted for our house.
After I made the mahogany coffee table, I was feeling confident to tackle something larger.

Kristin and I enrolled in a "work completion lab" at the community college.
I looked through several plans. I really wanted to make one with curved stretchers and a top that was held on by massive sliding dovetails. (I still want to make it). We decided it was beyond our skills.

So we picked a basic Stickley trestle dining table, but scaled it down for our living room. It features a massive top and through/keyed tenons.

I spent one day running to Bonhoff Lumber to buy the rought 8/4 1/4sawn oak material.

Here it is so far:


Challenges
  1. Chopping the through tenons by hand as the thickness of the legs prohibited the use of the mortiser. The chips were flyin.
  2. Keyed tenons
  3. Learned to resaw: Veneered quartersawn oak to two faces of each leg so that all faces are quartersawn.
  4. Jointing huge pieces

To come
  1. Sand top
  2. Ease edges and corners of top
  3. Sand tenon keys
    #Apply Finish
  4. Attach top

We stopped working on it because we needed to find the right finish. (Plus, see all my other excuses on prior post). I have been experimenting with a billion different stains. I also acquired ammonia (the real stuff) from a parent in my class who runs a blueprint shop. I have not had time to fume some samples. I am also not sure what type of clear finish to put over the whole thing. Shellac is out due to the sloshing beer/wine problem. Any advice? (Yes I have seent the twelve step process).

I will post some of my 50 stain samples sometime.

By the way: I have a new policy. No starting a project until a finish schedule is in place.
That is really coming together nicely… Will be looking forward to seeing the finished product. What type of finish are you planning on using? I would recommend some kind of Poly for a durable finish that will stand up….
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
History

History
We had a maple kitchen table that was very nice, but not the style we wanted for our house.
After I made the mahogany coffee table, I was feeling confident to tackle something larger.

Kristin and I enrolled in a "work completion lab" at the community college.
I looked through several plans. I really wanted to make one with curved stretchers and a top that was held on by massive sliding dovetails. (I still want to make it). We decided it was beyond our skills.

So we picked a basic Stickley trestle dining table, but scaled it down for our living room. It features a massive top and through/keyed tenons.

I spent one day running to Bonhoff Lumber to buy the rought 8/4 1/4sawn oak material.

Here it is so far:


Challenges
  1. Chopping the through tenons by hand as the thickness of the legs prohibited the use of the mortiser. The chips were flyin.
  2. Keyed tenons
  3. Learned to resaw: Veneered quartersawn oak to two faces of each leg so that all faces are quartersawn.
  4. Jointing huge pieces

To come
  1. Sand top
  2. Ease edges and corners of top
  3. Sand tenon keys
    #Apply Finish
  4. Attach top

We stopped working on it because we needed to find the right finish. (Plus, see all my other excuses on prior post). I have been experimenting with a billion different stains. I also acquired ammonia (the real stuff) from a parent in my class who runs a blueprint shop. I have not had time to fume some samples. I am also not sure what type of clear finish to put over the whole thing. Shellac is out due to the sloshing beer/wine problem. Any advice? (Yes I have seent the twelve step process).

I will post some of my 50 stain samples sometime.

By the way: I have a new policy. No starting a project until a finish schedule is in place.
I am not sure… what to do….

I have another small table that I am working on out of the same batch of wood.

I have tried the Minway Wipe-on Poly… I am worried it will look to plastic…
 

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18,890 Posts
History

History
We had a maple kitchen table that was very nice, but not the style we wanted for our house.
After I made the mahogany coffee table, I was feeling confident to tackle something larger.

Kristin and I enrolled in a "work completion lab" at the community college.
I looked through several plans. I really wanted to make one with curved stretchers and a top that was held on by massive sliding dovetails. (I still want to make it). We decided it was beyond our skills.

So we picked a basic Stickley trestle dining table, but scaled it down for our living room. It features a massive top and through/keyed tenons.

I spent one day running to Bonhoff Lumber to buy the rought 8/4 1/4sawn oak material.

Here it is so far:


Challenges
  1. Chopping the through tenons by hand as the thickness of the legs prohibited the use of the mortiser. The chips were flyin.
  2. Keyed tenons
  3. Learned to resaw: Veneered quartersawn oak to two faces of each leg so that all faces are quartersawn.
  4. Jointing huge pieces

To come
  1. Sand top
  2. Ease edges and corners of top
  3. Sand tenon keys
    #Apply Finish
  4. Attach top

We stopped working on it because we needed to find the right finish. (Plus, see all my other excuses on prior post). I have been experimenting with a billion different stains. I also acquired ammonia (the real stuff) from a parent in my class who runs a blueprint shop. I have not had time to fume some samples. I am also not sure what type of clear finish to put over the whole thing. Shellac is out due to the sloshing beer/wine problem. Any advice? (Yes I have seent the twelve step process).

I will post some of my 50 stain samples sometime.

By the way: I have a new policy. No starting a project until a finish schedule is in place.
this is big! and very nice.
I can't help you with finishes; it hasn't been on my experimenting list yet. But I'll be interested to see what you decide on.
 

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Joined
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4,569 Posts
History

History
We had a maple kitchen table that was very nice, but not the style we wanted for our house.
After I made the mahogany coffee table, I was feeling confident to tackle something larger.

Kristin and I enrolled in a "work completion lab" at the community college.
I looked through several plans. I really wanted to make one with curved stretchers and a top that was held on by massive sliding dovetails. (I still want to make it). We decided it was beyond our skills.

So we picked a basic Stickley trestle dining table, but scaled it down for our living room. It features a massive top and through/keyed tenons.

I spent one day running to Bonhoff Lumber to buy the rought 8/4 1/4sawn oak material.

Here it is so far:


Challenges
  1. Chopping the through tenons by hand as the thickness of the legs prohibited the use of the mortiser. The chips were flyin.
  2. Keyed tenons
  3. Learned to resaw: Veneered quartersawn oak to two faces of each leg so that all faces are quartersawn.
  4. Jointing huge pieces

To come
  1. Sand top
  2. Ease edges and corners of top
  3. Sand tenon keys
    #Apply Finish
  4. Attach top

We stopped working on it because we needed to find the right finish. (Plus, see all my other excuses on prior post). I have been experimenting with a billion different stains. I also acquired ammonia (the real stuff) from a parent in my class who runs a blueprint shop. I have not had time to fume some samples. I am also not sure what type of clear finish to put over the whole thing. Shellac is out due to the sloshing beer/wine problem. Any advice? (Yes I have seent the twelve step process).

I will post some of my 50 stain samples sometime.

By the way: I have a new policy. No starting a project until a finish schedule is in place.
Nothing like hand cutting through mortises in white oak! ;^)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
History

History
We had a maple kitchen table that was very nice, but not the style we wanted for our house.
After I made the mahogany coffee table, I was feeling confident to tackle something larger.

Kristin and I enrolled in a "work completion lab" at the community college.
I looked through several plans. I really wanted to make one with curved stretchers and a top that was held on by massive sliding dovetails. (I still want to make it). We decided it was beyond our skills.

So we picked a basic Stickley trestle dining table, but scaled it down for our living room. It features a massive top and through/keyed tenons.

I spent one day running to Bonhoff Lumber to buy the rought 8/4 1/4sawn oak material.

Here it is so far:


Challenges
  1. Chopping the through tenons by hand as the thickness of the legs prohibited the use of the mortiser. The chips were flyin.
  2. Keyed tenons
  3. Learned to resaw: Veneered quartersawn oak to two faces of each leg so that all faces are quartersawn.
  4. Jointing huge pieces

To come
  1. Sand top
  2. Ease edges and corners of top
  3. Sand tenon keys
    #Apply Finish
  4. Attach top

We stopped working on it because we needed to find the right finish. (Plus, see all my other excuses on prior post). I have been experimenting with a billion different stains. I also acquired ammonia (the real stuff) from a parent in my class who runs a blueprint shop. I have not had time to fume some samples. I am also not sure what type of clear finish to put over the whole thing. Shellac is out due to the sloshing beer/wine problem. Any advice? (Yes I have seent the twelve step process).

I will post some of my 50 stain samples sometime.

By the way: I have a new policy. No starting a project until a finish schedule is in place.
Updated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sketchup Animations, Plans, and Erasing the Past...

Plans

I geared up today to finish the table that was started three years ago. I began by reviewing all of the original plans. Starting with the book "The Furniture of Gustav Stickley" by Joseph J. Bavaro & Thomas L. Mossman.


This book is a great Stickley starter book for furniture making.

I modified the original table by making it shorter in length. My old style drawings…..


I also wanted to try a few new things in SketchUp that I had learned over at the Fine Woodworking Design Click Build Blog

Here is my rendering complete with a Sketchy Lined watermark


I also tried tying some scenes together in an animation. We will see if I can get it to post here.

http://www.flickr.com/apps/video/stewart.swf?v=55430

If not here is the link

Erasing the Past
All of the parts have been in storage in my office for a long time. I originally sanded the base parts to 400 but they have gotten some damage, and I have discovered that I like to finish the oak at 220 so back they go.


I took a closer look at the through tenon and noticed I have some clean up to do. But I also thought, clever me, I put a dowel through the end of the tenon to prevent slitting before mortising. It is only visible from the underside. Someone must have told me to do that.


My buddy Juan came over and we muscled the table top into the shop. It is so heavy at 1 1/2" x 42" x 78".

Some genius (me) had stained the entire top by using it before it was finished.
Cereal bowl stain.


Water stains and my pencil marks for sanding.


It took an entire album (Vampire Weekend) to sand the top to 80 grit. I went cross grain slowly, then with the grain, and then hand sanded lightly.
Halfway.

One side

Inspecting with light.


The flip side was not as messed up, so it only took about 2/3 of an album (Radiohead - In Rainbows).
It has the main piece of wood from Grandpa's Box
Great knots, so we will have to decide which side to use…. Hmm..

This side has a nice pattern write up the middle but the other side has better ray flecks.


Next time.. More grits and I visit a professional finisher to see how he does it.
 

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1,348 Posts
Sketchup Animations, Plans, and Erasing the Past...

Plans

I geared up today to finish the table that was started three years ago. I began by reviewing all of the original plans. Starting with the book "The Furniture of Gustav Stickley" by Joseph J. Bavaro & Thomas L. Mossman.


This book is a great Stickley starter book for furniture making.

I modified the original table by making it shorter in length. My old style drawings…..


I also wanted to try a few new things in SketchUp that I had learned over at the Fine Woodworking Design Click Build Blog

Here is my rendering complete with a Sketchy Lined watermark


I also tried tying some scenes together in an animation. We will see if I can get it to post here.

http://www.flickr.com/apps/video/stewart.swf?v=55430

If not here is the link

Erasing the Past
All of the parts have been in storage in my office for a long time. I originally sanded the base parts to 400 but they have gotten some damage, and I have discovered that I like to finish the oak at 220 so back they go.


I took a closer look at the through tenon and noticed I have some clean up to do. But I also thought, clever me, I put a dowel through the end of the tenon to prevent slitting before mortising. It is only visible from the underside. Someone must have told me to do that.


My buddy Juan came over and we muscled the table top into the shop. It is so heavy at 1 1/2" x 42" x 78".

Some genius (me) had stained the entire top by using it before it was finished.
Cereal bowl stain.


Water stains and my pencil marks for sanding.


It took an entire album (Vampire Weekend) to sand the top to 80 grit. I went cross grain slowly, then with the grain, and then hand sanded lightly.
Halfway.

One side

Inspecting with light.


The flip side was not as messed up, so it only took about 2/3 of an album (Radiohead - In Rainbows).
It has the main piece of wood from Grandpa's Box
Great knots, so we will have to decide which side to use…. Hmm..

This side has a nice pattern write up the middle but the other side has better ray flecks.


Next time.. More grits and I visit a professional finisher to see how he does it.
Cool, thanks for sharing. I can't wait to see it once it is assembled
 

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Registered
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2,799 Posts
Sketchup Animations, Plans, and Erasing the Past...

Plans

I geared up today to finish the table that was started three years ago. I began by reviewing all of the original plans. Starting with the book "The Furniture of Gustav Stickley" by Joseph J. Bavaro & Thomas L. Mossman.


This book is a great Stickley starter book for furniture making.

I modified the original table by making it shorter in length. My old style drawings…..


I also wanted to try a few new things in SketchUp that I had learned over at the Fine Woodworking Design Click Build Blog

Here is my rendering complete with a Sketchy Lined watermark


I also tried tying some scenes together in an animation. We will see if I can get it to post here.

http://www.flickr.com/apps/video/stewart.swf?v=55430

If not here is the link

Erasing the Past
All of the parts have been in storage in my office for a long time. I originally sanded the base parts to 400 but they have gotten some damage, and I have discovered that I like to finish the oak at 220 so back they go.


I took a closer look at the through tenon and noticed I have some clean up to do. But I also thought, clever me, I put a dowel through the end of the tenon to prevent slitting before mortising. It is only visible from the underside. Someone must have told me to do that.


My buddy Juan came over and we muscled the table top into the shop. It is so heavy at 1 1/2" x 42" x 78".

Some genius (me) had stained the entire top by using it before it was finished.
Cereal bowl stain.


Water stains and my pencil marks for sanding.


It took an entire album (Vampire Weekend) to sand the top to 80 grit. I went cross grain slowly, then with the grain, and then hand sanded lightly.
Halfway.

One side

Inspecting with light.


The flip side was not as messed up, so it only took about 2/3 of an album (Radiohead - In Rainbows).
It has the main piece of wood from Grandpa's Box
Great knots, so we will have to decide which side to use…. Hmm..

This side has a nice pattern write up the middle but the other side has better ray flecks.


Next time.. More grits and I visit a professional finisher to see how he does it.
cool. really nice animation too! thanks for the post.
 

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Registered
Joined
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2,153 Posts
Sketchup Animations, Plans, and Erasing the Past...

Plans

I geared up today to finish the table that was started three years ago. I began by reviewing all of the original plans. Starting with the book "The Furniture of Gustav Stickley" by Joseph J. Bavaro & Thomas L. Mossman.


This book is a great Stickley starter book for furniture making.

I modified the original table by making it shorter in length. My old style drawings…..


I also wanted to try a few new things in SketchUp that I had learned over at the Fine Woodworking Design Click Build Blog

Here is my rendering complete with a Sketchy Lined watermark


I also tried tying some scenes together in an animation. We will see if I can get it to post here.

http://www.flickr.com/apps/video/stewart.swf?v=55430

If not here is the link

Erasing the Past
All of the parts have been in storage in my office for a long time. I originally sanded the base parts to 400 but they have gotten some damage, and I have discovered that I like to finish the oak at 220 so back they go.


I took a closer look at the through tenon and noticed I have some clean up to do. But I also thought, clever me, I put a dowel through the end of the tenon to prevent slitting before mortising. It is only visible from the underside. Someone must have told me to do that.


My buddy Juan came over and we muscled the table top into the shop. It is so heavy at 1 1/2" x 42" x 78".

Some genius (me) had stained the entire top by using it before it was finished.
Cereal bowl stain.


Water stains and my pencil marks for sanding.


It took an entire album (Vampire Weekend) to sand the top to 80 grit. I went cross grain slowly, then with the grain, and then hand sanded lightly.
Halfway.

One side

Inspecting with light.


The flip side was not as messed up, so it only took about 2/3 of an album (Radiohead - In Rainbows).
It has the main piece of wood from Grandpa's Box
Great knots, so we will have to decide which side to use…. Hmm..

This side has a nice pattern write up the middle but the other side has better ray flecks.


Next time.. More grits and I visit a professional finisher to see how he does it.
This is a nice sturdy table, John. I made one 84" x 38" for my wife. Finished it natural. Wife is not too keen on the dark furniture.
 

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Sketchup Animations, Plans, and Erasing the Past...

Plans

I geared up today to finish the table that was started three years ago. I began by reviewing all of the original plans. Starting with the book "The Furniture of Gustav Stickley" by Joseph J. Bavaro & Thomas L. Mossman.


This book is a great Stickley starter book for furniture making.

I modified the original table by making it shorter in length. My old style drawings…..


I also wanted to try a few new things in SketchUp that I had learned over at the Fine Woodworking Design Click Build Blog

Here is my rendering complete with a Sketchy Lined watermark


I also tried tying some scenes together in an animation. We will see if I can get it to post here.

http://www.flickr.com/apps/video/stewart.swf?v=55430

If not here is the link

Erasing the Past
All of the parts have been in storage in my office for a long time. I originally sanded the base parts to 400 but they have gotten some damage, and I have discovered that I like to finish the oak at 220 so back they go.


I took a closer look at the through tenon and noticed I have some clean up to do. But I also thought, clever me, I put a dowel through the end of the tenon to prevent slitting before mortising. It is only visible from the underside. Someone must have told me to do that.


My buddy Juan came over and we muscled the table top into the shop. It is so heavy at 1 1/2" x 42" x 78".

Some genius (me) had stained the entire top by using it before it was finished.
Cereal bowl stain.


Water stains and my pencil marks for sanding.


It took an entire album (Vampire Weekend) to sand the top to 80 grit. I went cross grain slowly, then with the grain, and then hand sanded lightly.
Halfway.

One side

Inspecting with light.


The flip side was not as messed up, so it only took about 2/3 of an album (Radiohead - In Rainbows).
It has the main piece of wood from Grandpa's Box
Great knots, so we will have to decide which side to use…. Hmm..

This side has a nice pattern write up the middle but the other side has better ray flecks.


Next time.. More grits and I visit a professional finisher to see how he does it.
Beautiful table. I think it will be around for a couple hundred years. Don't forget to sign and date it.
 

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1,939 Posts
Sketchup Animations, Plans, and Erasing the Past...

Plans

I geared up today to finish the table that was started three years ago. I began by reviewing all of the original plans. Starting with the book "The Furniture of Gustav Stickley" by Joseph J. Bavaro & Thomas L. Mossman.


This book is a great Stickley starter book for furniture making.

I modified the original table by making it shorter in length. My old style drawings…..


I also wanted to try a few new things in SketchUp that I had learned over at the Fine Woodworking Design Click Build Blog

Here is my rendering complete with a Sketchy Lined watermark


I also tried tying some scenes together in an animation. We will see if I can get it to post here.

http://www.flickr.com/apps/video/stewart.swf?v=55430

If not here is the link

Erasing the Past
All of the parts have been in storage in my office for a long time. I originally sanded the base parts to 400 but they have gotten some damage, and I have discovered that I like to finish the oak at 220 so back they go.


I took a closer look at the through tenon and noticed I have some clean up to do. But I also thought, clever me, I put a dowel through the end of the tenon to prevent slitting before mortising. It is only visible from the underside. Someone must have told me to do that.


My buddy Juan came over and we muscled the table top into the shop. It is so heavy at 1 1/2" x 42" x 78".

Some genius (me) had stained the entire top by using it before it was finished.
Cereal bowl stain.


Water stains and my pencil marks for sanding.


It took an entire album (Vampire Weekend) to sand the top to 80 grit. I went cross grain slowly, then with the grain, and then hand sanded lightly.
Halfway.

One side

Inspecting with light.


The flip side was not as messed up, so it only took about 2/3 of an album (Radiohead - In Rainbows).
It has the main piece of wood from Grandpa's Box
Great knots, so we will have to decide which side to use…. Hmm..

This side has a nice pattern write up the middle but the other side has better ray flecks.


Next time.. More grits and I visit a professional finisher to see how he does it.
Very nice John; Can't wait to see the finished product. I'm still trying to get a hang of SketchUp.
 

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1,770 Posts
Sketchup Animations, Plans, and Erasing the Past...

Plans

I geared up today to finish the table that was started three years ago. I began by reviewing all of the original plans. Starting with the book "The Furniture of Gustav Stickley" by Joseph J. Bavaro & Thomas L. Mossman.


This book is a great Stickley starter book for furniture making.

I modified the original table by making it shorter in length. My old style drawings…..


I also wanted to try a few new things in SketchUp that I had learned over at the Fine Woodworking Design Click Build Blog

Here is my rendering complete with a Sketchy Lined watermark


I also tried tying some scenes together in an animation. We will see if I can get it to post here.

http://www.flickr.com/apps/video/stewart.swf?v=55430

If not here is the link

Erasing the Past
All of the parts have been in storage in my office for a long time. I originally sanded the base parts to 400 but they have gotten some damage, and I have discovered that I like to finish the oak at 220 so back they go.


I took a closer look at the through tenon and noticed I have some clean up to do. But I also thought, clever me, I put a dowel through the end of the tenon to prevent slitting before mortising. It is only visible from the underside. Someone must have told me to do that.


My buddy Juan came over and we muscled the table top into the shop. It is so heavy at 1 1/2" x 42" x 78".

Some genius (me) had stained the entire top by using it before it was finished.
Cereal bowl stain.


Water stains and my pencil marks for sanding.


It took an entire album (Vampire Weekend) to sand the top to 80 grit. I went cross grain slowly, then with the grain, and then hand sanded lightly.
Halfway.

One side

Inspecting with light.


The flip side was not as messed up, so it only took about 2/3 of an album (Radiohead - In Rainbows).
It has the main piece of wood from Grandpa's Box
Great knots, so we will have to decide which side to use…. Hmm..

This side has a nice pattern write up the middle but the other side has better ray flecks.


Next time.. More grits and I visit a professional finisher to see how he does it.
Looks like you're up to completing the lost and (not so) forgotton pieces these days. I commend you for that! I'm just getting around to finishing a little table I started last summer.

That's gonna be a heck of a dining table!
 

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Sketchup Animations, Plans, and Erasing the Past...

Plans

I geared up today to finish the table that was started three years ago. I began by reviewing all of the original plans. Starting with the book "The Furniture of Gustav Stickley" by Joseph J. Bavaro & Thomas L. Mossman.


This book is a great Stickley starter book for furniture making.

I modified the original table by making it shorter in length. My old style drawings…..


I also wanted to try a few new things in SketchUp that I had learned over at the Fine Woodworking Design Click Build Blog

Here is my rendering complete with a Sketchy Lined watermark


I also tried tying some scenes together in an animation. We will see if I can get it to post here.

http://www.flickr.com/apps/video/stewart.swf?v=55430

If not here is the link

Erasing the Past
All of the parts have been in storage in my office for a long time. I originally sanded the base parts to 400 but they have gotten some damage, and I have discovered that I like to finish the oak at 220 so back they go.


I took a closer look at the through tenon and noticed I have some clean up to do. But I also thought, clever me, I put a dowel through the end of the tenon to prevent slitting before mortising. It is only visible from the underside. Someone must have told me to do that.


My buddy Juan came over and we muscled the table top into the shop. It is so heavy at 1 1/2" x 42" x 78".

Some genius (me) had stained the entire top by using it before it was finished.
Cereal bowl stain.


Water stains and my pencil marks for sanding.


It took an entire album (Vampire Weekend) to sand the top to 80 grit. I went cross grain slowly, then with the grain, and then hand sanded lightly.
Halfway.

One side

Inspecting with light.


The flip side was not as messed up, so it only took about 2/3 of an album (Radiohead - In Rainbows).
It has the main piece of wood from Grandpa's Box
Great knots, so we will have to decide which side to use…. Hmm..

This side has a nice pattern write up the middle but the other side has better ray flecks.


Next time.. More grits and I visit a professional finisher to see how he does it.
Love your table.
Why did you put the dowl into the end?
"I put a dowel through the end of the tenon to prevent slitting before mortising. It is only visible from the underside. Someone must have told me to do that."

Can you elaborate?
Any one have any expiriance with Brasilian Mahogany, I got some from a friend who could not use it.
He had got it for wood flooring with toung and grove, but it warped and was unusable for flooring..
Now I want too try to make it into a table….

Sven
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Sketchup Animations, Plans, and Erasing the Past...

Plans

I geared up today to finish the table that was started three years ago. I began by reviewing all of the original plans. Starting with the book "The Furniture of Gustav Stickley" by Joseph J. Bavaro & Thomas L. Mossman.


This book is a great Stickley starter book for furniture making.

I modified the original table by making it shorter in length. My old style drawings…..


I also wanted to try a few new things in SketchUp that I had learned over at the Fine Woodworking Design Click Build Blog

Here is my rendering complete with a Sketchy Lined watermark


I also tried tying some scenes together in an animation. We will see if I can get it to post here.

http://www.flickr.com/apps/video/stewart.swf?v=55430

If not here is the link

Erasing the Past
All of the parts have been in storage in my office for a long time. I originally sanded the base parts to 400 but they have gotten some damage, and I have discovered that I like to finish the oak at 220 so back they go.


I took a closer look at the through tenon and noticed I have some clean up to do. But I also thought, clever me, I put a dowel through the end of the tenon to prevent slitting before mortising. It is only visible from the underside. Someone must have told me to do that.


My buddy Juan came over and we muscled the table top into the shop. It is so heavy at 1 1/2" x 42" x 78".

Some genius (me) had stained the entire top by using it before it was finished.
Cereal bowl stain.


Water stains and my pencil marks for sanding.


It took an entire album (Vampire Weekend) to sand the top to 80 grit. I went cross grain slowly, then with the grain, and then hand sanded lightly.
Halfway.

One side

Inspecting with light.


The flip side was not as messed up, so it only took about 2/3 of an album (Radiohead - In Rainbows).
It has the main piece of wood from Grandpa's Box
Great knots, so we will have to decide which side to use…. Hmm..

This side has a nice pattern write up the middle but the other side has better ray flecks.


Next time.. More grits and I visit a professional finisher to see how he does it.
I put the dowel in the end so that when I mortised or hammered in the loose tenon, there was extra reinforcement.
 

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Sketchup Animations, Plans, and Erasing the Past...

Plans

I geared up today to finish the table that was started three years ago. I began by reviewing all of the original plans. Starting with the book "The Furniture of Gustav Stickley" by Joseph J. Bavaro & Thomas L. Mossman.


This book is a great Stickley starter book for furniture making.

I modified the original table by making it shorter in length. My old style drawings…..


I also wanted to try a few new things in SketchUp that I had learned over at the Fine Woodworking Design Click Build Blog

Here is my rendering complete with a Sketchy Lined watermark


I also tried tying some scenes together in an animation. We will see if I can get it to post here.

http://www.flickr.com/apps/video/stewart.swf?v=55430

If not here is the link

Erasing the Past
All of the parts have been in storage in my office for a long time. I originally sanded the base parts to 400 but they have gotten some damage, and I have discovered that I like to finish the oak at 220 so back they go.


I took a closer look at the through tenon and noticed I have some clean up to do. But I also thought, clever me, I put a dowel through the end of the tenon to prevent slitting before mortising. It is only visible from the underside. Someone must have told me to do that.


My buddy Juan came over and we muscled the table top into the shop. It is so heavy at 1 1/2" x 42" x 78".

Some genius (me) had stained the entire top by using it before it was finished.
Cereal bowl stain.


Water stains and my pencil marks for sanding.


It took an entire album (Vampire Weekend) to sand the top to 80 grit. I went cross grain slowly, then with the grain, and then hand sanded lightly.
Halfway.

One side

Inspecting with light.


The flip side was not as messed up, so it only took about 2/3 of an album (Radiohead - In Rainbows).
It has the main piece of wood from Grandpa's Box
Great knots, so we will have to decide which side to use…. Hmm..

This side has a nice pattern write up the middle but the other side has better ray flecks.


Next time.. More grits and I visit a professional finisher to see how he does it.
Beautiful table I can;t wait till it is completed. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Finish: Fuming, Waiting, and Shellac


After about one week of sanding. It took forever!

I will be attaching the top with countersunk lag screws.



The holes are over sized to handle movement. The screws will only bite into the top.

I put the base together to test it.



I built a large tent this time from plywood strips and extra bender board left over from the garden.

Here is a shot of the table going into the tent.


Suited up for ammonia.


Here are the test pieces. Left to Right: After four hours with no finish, with Boiled Linseed Oil, 6 hours with BLO


It has been humid here, so I waited a few days for the air to dry out. I use a first coat of very thin shellac.
Here is a shot with one leg assembly first coated.


Wet top.

After all parts coated once.


The colors are very different in the florescent lights. Here is a shot with natural light and the flash.



Next time : a little dye and blending? More shellac, poly for the top, wax…
 

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Finish: Fuming, Waiting, and Shellac


After about one week of sanding. It took forever!

I will be attaching the top with countersunk lag screws.



The holes are over sized to handle movement. The screws will only bite into the top.

I put the base together to test it.



I built a large tent this time from plywood strips and extra bender board left over from the garden.

Here is a shot of the table going into the tent.


Suited up for ammonia.


Here are the test pieces. Left to Right: After four hours with no finish, with Boiled Linseed Oil, 6 hours with BLO


It has been humid here, so I waited a few days for the air to dry out. I use a first coat of very thin shellac.
Here is a shot with one leg assembly first coated.


Wet top.

After all parts coated once.


The colors are very different in the florescent lights. Here is a shot with natural light and the flash.



Next time : a little dye and blending? More shellac, poly for the top, wax…
I love the look of the fumed finish. Just no nerve to try it (or a place to do it safely either. Looks like a nice solid piece. What are the overall dimensions?
 
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