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Had an opportunity to use my recently acquired Stew-Mac scrapers on some walnut inlaid curly maple drawer fronts.
The walnut is a 1/4" strip lengthwise on the drawer front that forms pulls as it passes over two forstner formed recesses. I used the scraper to level the walnut even with the maple.
These little scrapers are designed for luthiers' use but, they are great for small smoothing tasks on any project. Especially on hard to work wood like curly maple.
I especially like the heft of these. They are about 3/16 thick and have divots in the sides for your thumbs. Far more comfortable to use than a traditional thin scraper.
Here is their site.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Lew,
Here's an excellent video from Stew-Mac that shows how to sharpen it.
 

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LJ gfadvm (Andy) uses them. I bought a set of the three shapes with an extra one of the large "oval" one for a luthier friend of mine. So far, the only thing I've scraped is a small area of my workbench. I'll need to get the hang of using it vertically without chattering. More practice is needed.
 

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They look like really nice tools. I have had a need for one a time or two. I may buy some, too!!

Thanks, Gene….................Jim
 

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Think I'll stick with the various thin scrapers and scraper holder. Appears the traditional method of scraper sharpening will yield a sharper, finer edge vs these thick scrapers. Thinner scrapers can be left with the same type edge one will get with these thick ones. I use smoothing planes to get flat and smooth, and card scrapers for very light material removal. Appears these thick scrapers are more for replacing a smoothing plane vs card scrapers. I may be missing something, but I don't see a place for these.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Different strokes, I guess.
They are designed for smaller work, specifically for stringed instruments.
I use both the traditional card scrapers and, even glass at times, as well as the Stew-Macs, for smaller stuff.
The Stew-macs hold an edge far longer than a card scraper and are much faster to sharpen. One pass across a composite wheel and it's done.

Think I ll stick with the various thin scrapers and scraper holder. Appears the traditional method of scraper sharpening will yield a sharper, finer edge vs these thick scrapers. Thinner scrapers can be left with the same type edge one will get with these thick ones. I use smoothing planes to get flat and smooth, and card scrapers for very light material removal. Appears these thick scrapers are more for replacing a smoothing plane vs card scrapers. I may be missing something, but I don t see a place for these.

- OSU55
 

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I watched the video, and the guy was using it on a fair sized piece of wood, certainly large enough for my small and medium sized planes, and I didn't see him use one on a small piece. If they are for smaller stuff, one would think it would be in the video. I will correct something stated in the video, or maybe I heard it incorrectly - that something with Rc 62-63 hardness can't have a burr burnished - it can, I do so with a Veritas A2 scraper blade, but it has a 45° bevel. Also, a carbide burnisher won't be affected by tool steel. I agree these thick scrapers, at that hardness, could not be burnished to raise a burr.
 

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Gene i have used these on several types of wood and they are the best of scrappers ,been meaning to do a review of them myself ,well worth the money ,still using the same edge for a while now ,a lot easier to sharpen too
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
eddie,
I just finished scraping two curly maple boards. 18X8, both sides. Used the Stew-Mac one one and the card scraper on the other. Both did the job. Had to turn the card scraper four times to get to a good burr. Now I gotta sharpen it again. The Stew-Mac is still sharp. I think, I'll retire the card scraper.
Another thing I found, The Stew-Mac, being as rigid as it is, makes scraping end grain very easy. I never could get a decent cut on end grain with the card scraper. Probably my technique, though.
 

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Being the cheap curmudgeon that I am, I just stick to single-edge razor blades bought 100 to a box for $2.50 or so at Harbor Freight or $5 per box at the local hardware store. I have scraped a number of cabinets in their entirety this way. No sharpening, just grab a new blade at 2 1/2 cents ea. : )
 
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