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In the home stretch :)

I had a little bit of cleanup left to do. I put a couple of coats of Tru-Oil on the knob and tote. I also had the cam rest from CL810 that I hadn't cleaned up yet.

Before.
Outerwear Textile Sleeve Jersey Grey


After.
Jeans Textile Sleeve Jersey T-shirt


Then there was the slitter which I hadn't payed any attention to yet. I cleaned it up on some wet dry paper to remove some surface corrosion. It was pretty dull so out came the diamond plates.
Wood Finger Flooring Nail Gas


I quickly realized there was a lot of work to do on that little sucker and that it wasn't all going to get done freehand. There is a chip in one cutting edge and a lot of pitting in spots on the bevel:
Outerwear Sleeve Grey Glove Collar


There is a lot of pitting at the back too:
Outerwear Jersey Sleeve Jacket Grey


So, I gave it a marginally passable edge on the side opposite the chip and let it go. Rather than grinding back past the chip and hoping for the best with the pitting, if I find the slitter is something I have use for, I'll just make a new one from some O1 stock. This one isn't worth the effort.

The final chore was putting some rust protection on the metal since I'd brushed it down to bare in most spots. I had kept it oiled since clean-up so I wiped the parts down to remove the oil. I decided to go with good old paste wax.
Ingredient Rock-climbing equipment Personal protective equipment Wood Bag


I put a coat on pretty much everywhere. I rubbed it into the stippled cast areas with the tooth brush and put a thin coat on the insides of holes with a q-tip.
Wood Table Gas Hardwood Paint


I let it dry until it hazed over and buffed it out with a cotton rag. All the hardware bits got the same treatment except the threads. Threads got rolled in the block of Parrafin wax before being installed.

Now it was time to put it all back together :)) I had taken plenty of pictures during disassembly to be sure I got all the screws and thumbscrews put back in the proper spots. First, I put the fence piece back together.
Wood Tool Metal Hand tool Rectangle


Next was the skate.
Sleeve Wood Everyday carry Beige Rectangle


And finally the main body.
Sleeve Wood Font Jewellery Revolver


Then I put them all together with the rods.
Air gun Trigger Shotgun Wood Revolver


I can see that making some longer rods for this guy is going to be a priority. These short ones strike me as pretty useless for anything other than rabbets or grooves really close to the edge. I have some bar stock so as soon as time permits, I'll be turning some longer ones.

Looking back and comparing a "before" picture:
Sleeve Wood Bag Luggage and bags Font


with a few "after" pictures:
Revolver Helmet Wood Musical instrument Shotgun


Musical instrument Sleeve Revolver Music Musical instrument accessory


Wood Metal Household hardware Door handle Fashion accessory


Wood Gas Metal Fashion accessory Antique


I feel like the effort thus far has been time well-spent. I know looking nice won't make it work better. But, it makes it more of pleasure to pick up and use for me.

I ain't done though. I still have the functional elements to address! Like I said, I need to make some longer rods. And I have a whole set of the original cutters that came with this baby that I haven't even taken out of the box yet. So, next time, I'll pull the blades out and assess their conditions and get to sharpening.

Until then, thanks for dropping by :)
Hey Hokie, you're making everybody drool. Beauty of a knob and handle there.
 

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In the home stretch :)

I had a little bit of cleanup left to do. I put a couple of coats of Tru-Oil on the knob and tote. I also had the cam rest from CL810 that I hadn't cleaned up yet.

Before.


After.


Then there was the slitter which I hadn't payed any attention to yet. I cleaned it up on some wet dry paper to remove some surface corrosion. It was pretty dull so out came the diamond plates.


I quickly realized there was a lot of work to do on that little sucker and that it wasn't all going to get done freehand. There is a chip in one cutting edge and a lot of pitting in spots on the bevel:


There is a lot of pitting at the back too:


So, I gave it a marginally passable edge on the side opposite the chip and let it go. Rather than grinding back past the chip and hoping for the best with the pitting, if I find the slitter is something I have use for, I'll just make a new one from some O1 stock. This one isn't worth the effort.

The final chore was putting some rust protection on the metal since I'd brushed it down to bare in most spots. I had kept it oiled since clean-up so I wiped the parts down to remove the oil. I decided to go with good old paste wax.


I put a coat on pretty much everywhere. I rubbed it into the stippled cast areas with the tooth brush and put a thin coat on the insides of holes with a q-tip.


I let it dry until it hazed over and buffed it out with a cotton rag. All the hardware bits got the same treatment except the threads. Threads got rolled in the block of Parrafin wax before being installed.

Now it was time to put it all back together :)) I had taken plenty of pictures during disassembly to be sure I got all the screws and thumbscrews put back in the proper spots. First, I put the fence piece back together.


Next was the skate.


And finally the main body.


Then I put them all together with the rods.


I can see that making some longer rods for this guy is going to be a priority. These short ones strike me as pretty useless for anything other than rabbets or grooves really close to the edge. I have some bar stock so as soon as time permits, I'll be turning some longer ones.

Looking back and comparing a "before" picture:


with a few "after" pictures:








I feel like the effort thus far has been time well-spent. I know looking nice won't make it work better. But, it makes it more of pleasure to pick up and use for me.

I ain't done though. I still have the functional elements to address! Like I said, I need to make some longer rods. And I have a whole set of the original cutters that came with this baby that I haven't even taken out of the box yet. So, next time, I'll pull the blades out and assess their conditions and get to sharpening.

Until then, thanks for dropping by :)
Absolutely gorgeous - I appreciate that you've made the tool your own
 

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Discussion Starter · #103 ·
Does it Really Work???

Well, I guess we know IT works. The plane has been around for over a century. The question was, could I make it work?

I haven't had any time to spend on this guy the past few weeks. All I have left to do is sharpen up the irons. But, I was making a small chisel stand to go on my workbench this past weekend and I needed to plow a groove in a piece of Cherry for the base. I was about to clear off the router table and set it up when it dawned on me that this was exactly the kind of job that made me think having a 45 on hand would be a good idea to begin with.

So, I pulled this guy out and took out the 1/4" blade and sharpened it to a 30 degree bevel. I'm not sure what angle most prefer but I checked it and the existing bevel was at about 30 so I stuck with it. (Any feedback is welcome)


I checked and the blade was a near perfect match to the piece that would fit into the groove.


I used a piece of scrap and adjusted the blade depth until it took a good cut. I made sure the blade was flush with the side of the main body skate. Then adjusted the sliding skate so it was flush with the other side of the blade. Then I scored a line on the piece I would be cutting for the edge of the groove.


Then I sat the plane on the workpiece with the blade aligned with the groove and sat the fence so it registered on my reference edge.


I sat the depth stop and took my first ever pass with a plow plane of any ilk :) It did what was intended so I must have got lucky in my setup!


So I continued making passes until I got to my desired depth.


There were definitely some lessons learned from my inaugural voyage. You can see in the above photo that I had to get a little creative with my plane stop. I did leave my piece oversized in length to accommodate any blowout I might have at the end of the cut. If I would have left a little extra width though, I could have used holdfasts to hold the work. Or even clamped it between dogs with my end vise. But my dogs are too far from the edge of the bench and my holdfasts interfered with the plane since I had cut it down to width.

Second, I had trouble getting the groove a constant depth. I ended up about 1/32" deeper at the end than at the beginning. No biggie, but this groove didn't require precision. I need to be mindful of how I start and end my cuts even more so than with a bench plane.

Third, my groove didn't have a square bottom. I think/hope the solution to this is fairly simple. I need the beading depth stop that attaches to the skate. Because the knob is on the fence, I applied more pressure to that side. With the depth stop being on the other side of the main body, there was nothing to prevent me from skewing the plane relative to the face of the work. So, if anyone has a beading stop they want to sell, hollar at me!

All-in-all though, the 45 proved up to the task. Setup wasn't as tedious as I had feared. And it worked to get a nice, tight fit for the piece that fit in the groove.






So, I'll call it a good purchase and a useful tool. Even a caveman like me can use it!

Thanks for following along through this adventure. Any advice or comments are welcome as always!
 

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Premium Member
Joined
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5,795 Posts
Does it Really Work???

Well, I guess we know IT works. The plane has been around for over a century. The question was, could I make it work?

I haven't had any time to spend on this guy the past few weeks. All I have left to do is sharpen up the irons. But, I was making a small chisel stand to go on my workbench this past weekend and I needed to plow a groove in a piece of Cherry for the base. I was about to clear off the router table and set it up when it dawned on me that this was exactly the kind of job that made me think having a 45 on hand would be a good idea to begin with.

So, I pulled this guy out and took out the 1/4" blade and sharpened it to a 30 degree bevel. I'm not sure what angle most prefer but I checked it and the existing bevel was at about 30 so I stuck with it. (Any feedback is welcome)


I checked and the blade was a near perfect match to the piece that would fit into the groove.


I used a piece of scrap and adjusted the blade depth until it took a good cut. I made sure the blade was flush with the side of the main body skate. Then adjusted the sliding skate so it was flush with the other side of the blade. Then I scored a line on the piece I would be cutting for the edge of the groove.


Then I sat the plane on the workpiece with the blade aligned with the groove and sat the fence so it registered on my reference edge.


I sat the depth stop and took my first ever pass with a plow plane of any ilk :) It did what was intended so I must have got lucky in my setup!


So I continued making passes until I got to my desired depth.


There were definitely some lessons learned from my inaugural voyage. You can see in the above photo that I had to get a little creative with my plane stop. I did leave my piece oversized in length to accommodate any blowout I might have at the end of the cut. If I would have left a little extra width though, I could have used holdfasts to hold the work. Or even clamped it between dogs with my end vise. But my dogs are too far from the edge of the bench and my holdfasts interfered with the plane since I had cut it down to width.

Second, I had trouble getting the groove a constant depth. I ended up about 1/32" deeper at the end than at the beginning. No biggie, but this groove didn't require precision. I need to be mindful of how I start and end my cuts even more so than with a bench plane.

Third, my groove didn't have a square bottom. I think/hope the solution to this is fairly simple. I need the beading depth stop that attaches to the skate. Because the knob is on the fence, I applied more pressure to that side. With the depth stop being on the other side of the main body, there was nothing to prevent me from skewing the plane relative to the face of the work. So, if anyone has a beading stop they want to sell, hollar at me!

All-in-all though, the 45 proved up to the task. Setup wasn't as tedious as I had feared. And it worked to get a nice, tight fit for the piece that fit in the groove.






So, I'll call it a good purchase and a useful tool. Even a caveman like me can use it!

Thanks for following along through this adventure. Any advice or comments are welcome as always!
Pretty AND functional. The plane, not you, Kenny. Mine is still safely stored away until I have time to work on it later this fall.
 

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Registered
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Discussion Starter · #105 ·
Does it Really Work???

Well, I guess we know IT works. The plane has been around for over a century. The question was, could I make it work?

I haven't had any time to spend on this guy the past few weeks. All I have left to do is sharpen up the irons. But, I was making a small chisel stand to go on my workbench this past weekend and I needed to plow a groove in a piece of Cherry for the base. I was about to clear off the router table and set it up when it dawned on me that this was exactly the kind of job that made me think having a 45 on hand would be a good idea to begin with.

So, I pulled this guy out and took out the 1/4" blade and sharpened it to a 30 degree bevel. I'm not sure what angle most prefer but I checked it and the existing bevel was at about 30 so I stuck with it. (Any feedback is welcome)


I checked and the blade was a near perfect match to the piece that would fit into the groove.


I used a piece of scrap and adjusted the blade depth until it took a good cut. I made sure the blade was flush with the side of the main body skate. Then adjusted the sliding skate so it was flush with the other side of the blade. Then I scored a line on the piece I would be cutting for the edge of the groove.


Then I sat the plane on the workpiece with the blade aligned with the groove and sat the fence so it registered on my reference edge.


I sat the depth stop and took my first ever pass with a plow plane of any ilk :) It did what was intended so I must have got lucky in my setup!


So I continued making passes until I got to my desired depth.


There were definitely some lessons learned from my inaugural voyage. You can see in the above photo that I had to get a little creative with my plane stop. I did leave my piece oversized in length to accommodate any blowout I might have at the end of the cut. If I would have left a little extra width though, I could have used holdfasts to hold the work. Or even clamped it between dogs with my end vise. But my dogs are too far from the edge of the bench and my holdfasts interfered with the plane since I had cut it down to width.

Second, I had trouble getting the groove a constant depth. I ended up about 1/32" deeper at the end than at the beginning. No biggie, but this groove didn't require precision. I need to be mindful of how I start and end my cuts even more so than with a bench plane.

Third, my groove didn't have a square bottom. I think/hope the solution to this is fairly simple. I need the beading depth stop that attaches to the skate. Because the knob is on the fence, I applied more pressure to that side. With the depth stop being on the other side of the main body, there was nothing to prevent me from skewing the plane relative to the face of the work. So, if anyone has a beading stop they want to sell, hollar at me!

All-in-all though, the 45 proved up to the task. Setup wasn't as tedious as I had feared. And it worked to get a nice, tight fit for the piece that fit in the groove.






So, I'll call it a good purchase and a useful tool. Even a caveman like me can use it!

Thanks for following along through this adventure. Any advice or comments are welcome as always!
Get to it when you can Earl. You know I'm not a hand tool only kinda guy but sometimes they can save you a ton of machine setup time when you only have one or two cuts to make!
 

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14,500 Posts
Does it Really Work???

Well, I guess we know IT works. The plane has been around for over a century. The question was, could I make it work?

I haven't had any time to spend on this guy the past few weeks. All I have left to do is sharpen up the irons. But, I was making a small chisel stand to go on my workbench this past weekend and I needed to plow a groove in a piece of Cherry for the base. I was about to clear off the router table and set it up when it dawned on me that this was exactly the kind of job that made me think having a 45 on hand would be a good idea to begin with.

So, I pulled this guy out and took out the 1/4" blade and sharpened it to a 30 degree bevel. I'm not sure what angle most prefer but I checked it and the existing bevel was at about 30 so I stuck with it. (Any feedback is welcome)


I checked and the blade was a near perfect match to the piece that would fit into the groove.


I used a piece of scrap and adjusted the blade depth until it took a good cut. I made sure the blade was flush with the side of the main body skate. Then adjusted the sliding skate so it was flush with the other side of the blade. Then I scored a line on the piece I would be cutting for the edge of the groove.


Then I sat the plane on the workpiece with the blade aligned with the groove and sat the fence so it registered on my reference edge.


I sat the depth stop and took my first ever pass with a plow plane of any ilk :) It did what was intended so I must have got lucky in my setup!


So I continued making passes until I got to my desired depth.


There were definitely some lessons learned from my inaugural voyage. You can see in the above photo that I had to get a little creative with my plane stop. I did leave my piece oversized in length to accommodate any blowout I might have at the end of the cut. If I would have left a little extra width though, I could have used holdfasts to hold the work. Or even clamped it between dogs with my end vise. But my dogs are too far from the edge of the bench and my holdfasts interfered with the plane since I had cut it down to width.

Second, I had trouble getting the groove a constant depth. I ended up about 1/32" deeper at the end than at the beginning. No biggie, but this groove didn't require precision. I need to be mindful of how I start and end my cuts even more so than with a bench plane.

Third, my groove didn't have a square bottom. I think/hope the solution to this is fairly simple. I need the beading depth stop that attaches to the skate. Because the knob is on the fence, I applied more pressure to that side. With the depth stop being on the other side of the main body, there was nothing to prevent me from skewing the plane relative to the face of the work. So, if anyone has a beading stop they want to sell, hollar at me!

All-in-all though, the 45 proved up to the task. Setup wasn't as tedious as I had feared. And it worked to get a nice, tight fit for the piece that fit in the groove.






So, I'll call it a good purchase and a useful tool. Even a caveman like me can use it!

Thanks for following along through this adventure. Any advice or comments are welcome as always!
Nice write-up. You should get many years of use out of the plane.
 

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Premium Member
Joined
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5,795 Posts
Does it Really Work???

Well, I guess we know IT works. The plane has been around for over a century. The question was, could I make it work?

I haven't had any time to spend on this guy the past few weeks. All I have left to do is sharpen up the irons. But, I was making a small chisel stand to go on my workbench this past weekend and I needed to plow a groove in a piece of Cherry for the base. I was about to clear off the router table and set it up when it dawned on me that this was exactly the kind of job that made me think having a 45 on hand would be a good idea to begin with.

So, I pulled this guy out and took out the 1/4" blade and sharpened it to a 30 degree bevel. I'm not sure what angle most prefer but I checked it and the existing bevel was at about 30 so I stuck with it. (Any feedback is welcome)


I checked and the blade was a near perfect match to the piece that would fit into the groove.


I used a piece of scrap and adjusted the blade depth until it took a good cut. I made sure the blade was flush with the side of the main body skate. Then adjusted the sliding skate so it was flush with the other side of the blade. Then I scored a line on the piece I would be cutting for the edge of the groove.


Then I sat the plane on the workpiece with the blade aligned with the groove and sat the fence so it registered on my reference edge.


I sat the depth stop and took my first ever pass with a plow plane of any ilk :) It did what was intended so I must have got lucky in my setup!


So I continued making passes until I got to my desired depth.


There were definitely some lessons learned from my inaugural voyage. You can see in the above photo that I had to get a little creative with my plane stop. I did leave my piece oversized in length to accommodate any blowout I might have at the end of the cut. If I would have left a little extra width though, I could have used holdfasts to hold the work. Or even clamped it between dogs with my end vise. But my dogs are too far from the edge of the bench and my holdfasts interfered with the plane since I had cut it down to width.

Second, I had trouble getting the groove a constant depth. I ended up about 1/32" deeper at the end than at the beginning. No biggie, but this groove didn't require precision. I need to be mindful of how I start and end my cuts even more so than with a bench plane.

Third, my groove didn't have a square bottom. I think/hope the solution to this is fairly simple. I need the beading depth stop that attaches to the skate. Because the knob is on the fence, I applied more pressure to that side. With the depth stop being on the other side of the main body, there was nothing to prevent me from skewing the plane relative to the face of the work. So, if anyone has a beading stop they want to sell, hollar at me!

All-in-all though, the 45 proved up to the task. Setup wasn't as tedious as I had feared. And it worked to get a nice, tight fit for the piece that fit in the groove.






So, I'll call it a good purchase and a useful tool. Even a caveman like me can use it!

Thanks for following along through this adventure. Any advice or comments are welcome as always!
I will need to do some practicing to remember how to use a hand held plane. Might get me to use other planes as well.
 

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In Loving Memory
Joined
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17,103 Posts
Does it Really Work???

Well, I guess we know IT works. The plane has been around for over a century. The question was, could I make it work?

I haven't had any time to spend on this guy the past few weeks. All I have left to do is sharpen up the irons. But, I was making a small chisel stand to go on my workbench this past weekend and I needed to plow a groove in a piece of Cherry for the base. I was about to clear off the router table and set it up when it dawned on me that this was exactly the kind of job that made me think having a 45 on hand would be a good idea to begin with.

So, I pulled this guy out and took out the 1/4" blade and sharpened it to a 30 degree bevel. I'm not sure what angle most prefer but I checked it and the existing bevel was at about 30 so I stuck with it. (Any feedback is welcome)


I checked and the blade was a near perfect match to the piece that would fit into the groove.


I used a piece of scrap and adjusted the blade depth until it took a good cut. I made sure the blade was flush with the side of the main body skate. Then adjusted the sliding skate so it was flush with the other side of the blade. Then I scored a line on the piece I would be cutting for the edge of the groove.


Then I sat the plane on the workpiece with the blade aligned with the groove and sat the fence so it registered on my reference edge.


I sat the depth stop and took my first ever pass with a plow plane of any ilk :) It did what was intended so I must have got lucky in my setup!


So I continued making passes until I got to my desired depth.


There were definitely some lessons learned from my inaugural voyage. You can see in the above photo that I had to get a little creative with my plane stop. I did leave my piece oversized in length to accommodate any blowout I might have at the end of the cut. If I would have left a little extra width though, I could have used holdfasts to hold the work. Or even clamped it between dogs with my end vise. But my dogs are too far from the edge of the bench and my holdfasts interfered with the plane since I had cut it down to width.

Second, I had trouble getting the groove a constant depth. I ended up about 1/32" deeper at the end than at the beginning. No biggie, but this groove didn't require precision. I need to be mindful of how I start and end my cuts even more so than with a bench plane.

Third, my groove didn't have a square bottom. I think/hope the solution to this is fairly simple. I need the beading depth stop that attaches to the skate. Because the knob is on the fence, I applied more pressure to that side. With the depth stop being on the other side of the main body, there was nothing to prevent me from skewing the plane relative to the face of the work. So, if anyone has a beading stop they want to sell, hollar at me!

All-in-all though, the 45 proved up to the task. Setup wasn't as tedious as I had feared. And it worked to get a nice, tight fit for the piece that fit in the groove.






So, I'll call it a good purchase and a useful tool. Even a caveman like me can use it!

Thanks for following along through this adventure. Any advice or comments are welcome as always!
Wish I had one of these. Nice work for a first. I hear they are not all that easy to set up and use, so you must have done it pretty well since you got such a good result. Have fun!
 

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Does it Really Work???

Well, I guess we know IT works. The plane has been around for over a century. The question was, could I make it work?

I haven't had any time to spend on this guy the past few weeks. All I have left to do is sharpen up the irons. But, I was making a small chisel stand to go on my workbench this past weekend and I needed to plow a groove in a piece of Cherry for the base. I was about to clear off the router table and set it up when it dawned on me that this was exactly the kind of job that made me think having a 45 on hand would be a good idea to begin with.

So, I pulled this guy out and took out the 1/4" blade and sharpened it to a 30 degree bevel. I'm not sure what angle most prefer but I checked it and the existing bevel was at about 30 so I stuck with it. (Any feedback is welcome)


I checked and the blade was a near perfect match to the piece that would fit into the groove.


I used a piece of scrap and adjusted the blade depth until it took a good cut. I made sure the blade was flush with the side of the main body skate. Then adjusted the sliding skate so it was flush with the other side of the blade. Then I scored a line on the piece I would be cutting for the edge of the groove.


Then I sat the plane on the workpiece with the blade aligned with the groove and sat the fence so it registered on my reference edge.


I sat the depth stop and took my first ever pass with a plow plane of any ilk :) It did what was intended so I must have got lucky in my setup!


So I continued making passes until I got to my desired depth.


There were definitely some lessons learned from my inaugural voyage. You can see in the above photo that I had to get a little creative with my plane stop. I did leave my piece oversized in length to accommodate any blowout I might have at the end of the cut. If I would have left a little extra width though, I could have used holdfasts to hold the work. Or even clamped it between dogs with my end vise. But my dogs are too far from the edge of the bench and my holdfasts interfered with the plane since I had cut it down to width.

Second, I had trouble getting the groove a constant depth. I ended up about 1/32" deeper at the end than at the beginning. No biggie, but this groove didn't require precision. I need to be mindful of how I start and end my cuts even more so than with a bench plane.

Third, my groove didn't have a square bottom. I think/hope the solution to this is fairly simple. I need the beading depth stop that attaches to the skate. Because the knob is on the fence, I applied more pressure to that side. With the depth stop being on the other side of the main body, there was nothing to prevent me from skewing the plane relative to the face of the work. So, if anyone has a beading stop they want to sell, hollar at me!

All-in-all though, the 45 proved up to the task. Setup wasn't as tedious as I had feared. And it worked to get a nice, tight fit for the piece that fit in the groove.






So, I'll call it a good purchase and a useful tool. Even a caveman like me can use it!

Thanks for following along through this adventure. Any advice or comments are welcome as always!
Excellent job brother! Seriously loving the look of that one. Mine is pretty plane Jane. Definitely a great job on the chisel stand too!
 

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