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I give up. Either I'm over 0.001 or under 0.001. Can't do any better squaring up my new crosscut sled.
I've used the 3 cut and 5 cut test methods. And also tested with digital protractor.
Is it necessary to be @ 0.000 or is mostly physiological since we are talking about wood working and not precision instrumentation design here. What is acceptable?
I guess I feel a gypped I can't get it 100%
THX
 

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I used a square to attach the first runner. Slid the sled through the blade and turned off the saw. Slid the second runner into the slot with 2 sided tape on it and pried up the ends. Removed sled and screwed on the second runner. Close enough, I never checked the accuracy of it.
 

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Papadan said it best. Wood is not metal. Having your sled square down to the thousandth is really meaningless when you consider all the other variables like arbor runout, wood movement, etc. If you've got it down to +/- .001, you are already even more accurate than you need to be.
 

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Do a test piece.

Cross cut a piece of 1 X 6 or anything with parallel edges in half.

A ripped piece of scrap MDF works great.

Take one of the halves and flip it so the bottom is now on top.

Match up the cut edges while holding both halves against the fence.

If you see a noticeable gap, then continue to adjust.

When it is a perfect 90, there will be no gap.

The process works great for miter saws too.

No square, No measuring required.
 

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Charile is dead on (pun intended). I grew up in a tool and die machine shop with a Shopsmith in the garage at home. Every material and craft has its own tolerances. The idea that woodworking has tolerances of +/-.001 would be laughed at in the machine shop.
 

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I really like this method. (Not my idea it was in one of the magazines.)

I put one screw in on the right holding the fence as a pivot point I'll line it up as best as possible with a square and then put one screw on the far left and then test it. I'll adjust it by making the left hole for the screw a slot and repeat the process till it's dead on then clamp the fence and put the rest of the screws in. Then one final test.
 

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is your blade exactly .000 inline with your miter slots? if it isnt youll always be off.

i say just make sure your blade is as close to parallel as possible, fit your miter bars and make a kerf cut. then use a framing square and set your fence. thats how norm does it
 

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For what it is worth, the guy that sold me my sawstop and other tools (powermatic drill press, band saw and mortiser, and delta jointer and planer) said that if you were within .003" you were fine. I agree with CharlieM1958 - this is wood, not metal. The variation in humidity and temperature from one day to the next will increase/decrease your 0.001" offset.
 
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