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Hello,

I have a nice stockpile of 2×12 - #1 SYP. I purchased it and stickered it in my garage for a couple months before building my workbench and some other shop furniture/jigs. The problem is (a good one I suppose) that I still have several really nice boards. I was wondering about using it for small furniture projects: stools, end table, etc. If I mill it and make sure it is sufficiently dry, would it be ok? Or will there be too much movement?

Thanks,
Chip
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No, I haven't. I don't have a moisture meter, but I am hoping Santa will bring me one for Christmas. With my workbench, I simply let the wood set in my garage for a couple months. I had heard that would be sufficient. But I'm not really as confident when it comes to building a piece of furniture for inside. If Santa came early and I picked up a moisture meter, what level of moisture would I want the wood to attain?
 

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Generally softwoods move less, rather than more, than hardwoods. Quartersawn eastern white pine is far more dimensionally stable than all of the regular North American hardwoods. SYP has expansion-contraction rates similar to those of many hardwoods. See the table at http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/108898/calculating-for-wood-movement
The issue with softwoods tends to be the way that they are milled and dried. Wood sawn for construction purposes often has the pith still in it and may crack, or it has been stored outside uncovered and may warp as it dries, or it was dried too quickly. But if you have nice boards that have acclimated there is absolutely no reason not to make first-class furniture out of it. If it's been in your garage for months I would expect it to be dry enough, although you may want to bring it into your house for a couple weeks.
 

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Southern yellow pine is one of my favorite woods, when I can get it here in California. A while back I salvaged some 6/4 stock which I made into a Medieval style stool, with the legs ( single boards) set in a shallow boxed rabbet and through mortice and tenoned to the top. It worked beautifully!
 
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