LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New Tool Skills

Up until this summer I had never used a lathe, and that was okay. I've been able to do what I wanted without it. Then last spring the guys in the adult ed class I take, including the instructor, got interested in making baseball bats. I don't know what started it but soon fully half the class was working on creating bats. At the time I was busy with other things.

I spent most of the summer session working on other projects, primarily an advent calendar for my nephew. With one more class left I realized that I had completed all the work I wanted to do in class on the advent calendar. So, I decided to join the club and make my own bat. Since I play softball, it would be a softball bat, not a baseball bat. (Primary difference between the two is the barrel diameter - softball bat barrels are narrower.

First step was to cut a couple of blanks from a slab of ash. I ended up with two blanks about 3 1/2 inches square and 36" long. The corners of the long edges were cut off at a 45 degree angle on the table saw leaving a hexagonal blank.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

The center at one end was punched with an awl, and at the other end a saw was used to mark the X seen in the picture. After mounting the blank in the lathe The corners were knocked off using a gouge (I'm not so good with the precise names of the tools.) until the entire blank was a cylinder. Using an aluminum bat as a reference I measured out the transition points - the edges of the knob, the point where the handle angles into the barrel and the end of the barrel. Those were marked with a pencil then cut using a parting tool.

Then using a skew chisel, gouges and parting tool I brought the barrel down to final dimension (about 2 1/4") and the taper into the handle was rouged out. This was the end of session #1 on bat number 1. The blank looked like this at that point.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Fast forward to last week, the first class of the fall session. I was able to finish the first bat through sanding. I was fairly please with the results although the knob is a little small. My instructor has recommended using a dog biscuit to burnish the bats, and he's offered to provide it, but didn't have it with him so I put the bat aside.

With the first bat finished I started in on the second bat. Class number one ended with the second blank ready for marking. On Thursday I was able to get the second bat to the same point as the first. I should be able to get them finished up next week.

Here are a couple more pictures of the almost completed bats:
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The first bat is in the middle, the second on the right, the bat on the left is the aluminum bat from which the dimensions were taken.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The knob of bat number 2.

I don't know how much more turning I'll do anytime soon. I do know that if I decide to do much more I'm also going to acquire my own tools. The tools available in class are just not sharp enough, and have been abused - broken handles, bent shafts, and the like.

It has been fun learning this new skill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
New Tool Skills

Up until this summer I had never used a lathe, and that was okay. I've been able to do what I wanted without it. Then last spring the guys in the adult ed class I take, including the instructor, got interested in making baseball bats. I don't know what started it but soon fully half the class was working on creating bats. At the time I was busy with other things.

I spent most of the summer session working on other projects, primarily an advent calendar for my nephew. With one more class left I realized that I had completed all the work I wanted to do in class on the advent calendar. So, I decided to join the club and make my own bat. Since I play softball, it would be a softball bat, not a baseball bat. (Primary difference between the two is the barrel diameter - softball bat barrels are narrower.

First step was to cut a couple of blanks from a slab of ash. I ended up with two blanks about 3 1/2 inches square and 36" long. The corners of the long edges were cut off at a 45 degree angle on the table saw leaving a hexagonal blank.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

The center at one end was punched with an awl, and at the other end a saw was used to mark the X seen in the picture. After mounting the blank in the lathe The corners were knocked off using a gouge (I'm not so good with the precise names of the tools.) until the entire blank was a cylinder. Using an aluminum bat as a reference I measured out the transition points - the edges of the knob, the point where the handle angles into the barrel and the end of the barrel. Those were marked with a pencil then cut using a parting tool.

Then using a skew chisel, gouges and parting tool I brought the barrel down to final dimension (about 2 1/4") and the taper into the handle was rouged out. This was the end of session #1 on bat number 1. The blank looked like this at that point.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Fast forward to last week, the first class of the fall session. I was able to finish the first bat through sanding. I was fairly please with the results although the knob is a little small. My instructor has recommended using a dog biscuit to burnish the bats, and he's offered to provide it, but didn't have it with him so I put the bat aside.

With the first bat finished I started in on the second bat. Class number one ended with the second blank ready for marking. On Thursday I was able to get the second bat to the same point as the first. I should be able to get them finished up next week.

Here are a couple more pictures of the almost completed bats:
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The first bat is in the middle, the second on the right, the bat on the left is the aluminum bat from which the dimensions were taken.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The knob of bat number 2.

I don't know how much more turning I'll do anytime soon. I do know that if I decide to do much more I'm also going to acquire my own tools. The tools available in class are just not sharp enough, and have been abused - broken handles, bent shafts, and the like.

It has been fun learning this new skill.
Great set of pictures. Keep us informed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,890 Posts
New Tool Skills

Up until this summer I had never used a lathe, and that was okay. I've been able to do what I wanted without it. Then last spring the guys in the adult ed class I take, including the instructor, got interested in making baseball bats. I don't know what started it but soon fully half the class was working on creating bats. At the time I was busy with other things.

I spent most of the summer session working on other projects, primarily an advent calendar for my nephew. With one more class left I realized that I had completed all the work I wanted to do in class on the advent calendar. So, I decided to join the club and make my own bat. Since I play softball, it would be a softball bat, not a baseball bat. (Primary difference between the two is the barrel diameter - softball bat barrels are narrower.

First step was to cut a couple of blanks from a slab of ash. I ended up with two blanks about 3 1/2 inches square and 36" long. The corners of the long edges were cut off at a 45 degree angle on the table saw leaving a hexagonal blank.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

The center at one end was punched with an awl, and at the other end a saw was used to mark the X seen in the picture. After mounting the blank in the lathe The corners were knocked off using a gouge (I'm not so good with the precise names of the tools.) until the entire blank was a cylinder. Using an aluminum bat as a reference I measured out the transition points - the edges of the knob, the point where the handle angles into the barrel and the end of the barrel. Those were marked with a pencil then cut using a parting tool.

Then using a skew chisel, gouges and parting tool I brought the barrel down to final dimension (about 2 1/4") and the taper into the handle was rouged out. This was the end of session #1 on bat number 1. The blank looked like this at that point.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Fast forward to last week, the first class of the fall session. I was able to finish the first bat through sanding. I was fairly please with the results although the knob is a little small. My instructor has recommended using a dog biscuit to burnish the bats, and he's offered to provide it, but didn't have it with him so I put the bat aside.

With the first bat finished I started in on the second bat. Class number one ended with the second blank ready for marking. On Thursday I was able to get the second bat to the same point as the first. I should be able to get them finished up next week.

Here are a couple more pictures of the almost completed bats:
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The first bat is in the middle, the second on the right, the bat on the left is the aluminum bat from which the dimensions were taken.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The knob of bat number 2.

I don't know how much more turning I'll do anytime soon. I do know that if I decide to do much more I'm also going to acquire my own tools. The tools available in class are just not sharp enough, and have been abused - broken handles, bent shafts, and the like.

It has been fun learning this new skill.
this is wonderful !!!
(I'll be sure to show this to Rick so he can made one from our free wood we got)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The Bats are Done

At class Thursday night I finished both of the softball bats.

First step was to burnish the bats using a dog's chew bone (without the meaty center :) ). This was done with the bats loaded into the lathe, but with the lathe off.

With that completed it was time to coat the bats with oil (natural Danish oil). This was done with the lathe spinning at the slowest speed.

And finally the bats were shined using handfuls of shavings (courtesy of the dust collection system). With the lathe running on slow both hands were loaded up with shavings and pressed up to the bat.

I'll post this as a project once I get some more pictures taken but for now this will have to do.

Completed Softball Bats
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,500 Posts
The Bats are Done

At class Thursday night I finished both of the softball bats.

First step was to burnish the bats using a dog's chew bone (without the meaty center :) ). This was done with the bats loaded into the lathe, but with the lathe off.

With that completed it was time to coat the bats with oil (natural Danish oil). This was done with the lathe spinning at the slowest speed.

And finally the bats were shined using handfuls of shavings (courtesy of the dust collection system). With the lathe running on slow both hands were loaded up with shavings and pressed up to the bat.

I'll post this as a project once I get some more pictures taken but for now this will have to do.

Completed Softball Bats
Very nice Chelle. They look great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The Bats are Done

At class Thursday night I finished both of the softball bats.

First step was to burnish the bats using a dog's chew bone (without the meaty center :) ). This was done with the bats loaded into the lathe, but with the lathe off.

With that completed it was time to coat the bats with oil (natural Danish oil). This was done with the lathe spinning at the slowest speed.

And finally the bats were shined using handfuls of shavings (courtesy of the dust collection system). With the lathe running on slow both hands were loaded up with shavings and pressed up to the bat.

I'll post this as a project once I get some more pictures taken but for now this will have to do.

Completed Softball Bats
Thanks. I'm pretty pleased, particularly since these represent my first attempt at using a lathe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,890 Posts
The Bats are Done

At class Thursday night I finished both of the softball bats.

First step was to burnish the bats using a dog's chew bone (without the meaty center :) ). This was done with the bats loaded into the lathe, but with the lathe off.

With that completed it was time to coat the bats with oil (natural Danish oil). This was done with the lathe spinning at the slowest speed.

And finally the bats were shined using handfuls of shavings (courtesy of the dust collection system). With the lathe running on slow both hands were loaded up with shavings and pressed up to the bat.

I'll post this as a project once I get some more pictures taken but for now this will have to do.

Completed Softball Bats
awesome indeed!
are you adding a logo to them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The Bats are Done

At class Thursday night I finished both of the softball bats.

First step was to burnish the bats using a dog's chew bone (without the meaty center :) ). This was done with the bats loaded into the lathe, but with the lathe off.

With that completed it was time to coat the bats with oil (natural Danish oil). This was done with the lathe spinning at the slowest speed.

And finally the bats were shined using handfuls of shavings (courtesy of the dust collection system). With the lathe running on slow both hands were loaded up with shavings and pressed up to the bat.

I'll post this as a project once I get some more pictures taken but for now this will have to do.

Completed Softball Bats
I'd like to but haven't decided yet what it will be. I'll let you know what ends up there, probably when I post these as a project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
The Bats are Done

At class Thursday night I finished both of the softball bats.

First step was to burnish the bats using a dog's chew bone (without the meaty center :) ). This was done with the bats loaded into the lathe, but with the lathe off.

With that completed it was time to coat the bats with oil (natural Danish oil). This was done with the lathe spinning at the slowest speed.

And finally the bats were shined using handfuls of shavings (courtesy of the dust collection system). With the lathe running on slow both hands were loaded up with shavings and pressed up to the bat.

I'll post this as a project once I get some more pictures taken but for now this will have to do.

Completed Softball Bats
Great looking bats.

Debbie there is a use for your wood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,890 Posts
The Bats are Done

At class Thursday night I finished both of the softball bats.

First step was to burnish the bats using a dog's chew bone (without the meaty center :) ). This was done with the bats loaded into the lathe, but with the lathe off.

With that completed it was time to coat the bats with oil (natural Danish oil). This was done with the lathe spinning at the slowest speed.

And finally the bats were shined using handfuls of shavings (courtesy of the dust collection system). With the lathe running on slow both hands were loaded up with shavings and pressed up to the bat.

I'll post this as a project once I get some more pictures taken but for now this will have to do.

Completed Softball Bats
I see that!!! That will be Rick's project - his woodworking love, is to do lathe work
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
The Bats are Done

At class Thursday night I finished both of the softball bats.

First step was to burnish the bats using a dog's chew bone (without the meaty center :) ). This was done with the bats loaded into the lathe, but with the lathe off.

With that completed it was time to coat the bats with oil (natural Danish oil). This was done with the lathe spinning at the slowest speed.

And finally the bats were shined using handfuls of shavings (courtesy of the dust collection system). With the lathe running on slow both hands were loaded up with shavings and pressed up to the bat.

I'll post this as a project once I get some more pictures taken but for now this will have to do.

Completed Softball Bats
Then you can use them as legs on a baseball themed table.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,589 Posts
The Bats are Done

At class Thursday night I finished both of the softball bats.

First step was to burnish the bats using a dog's chew bone (without the meaty center :) ). This was done with the bats loaded into the lathe, but with the lathe off.

With that completed it was time to coat the bats with oil (natural Danish oil). This was done with the lathe spinning at the slowest speed.

And finally the bats were shined using handfuls of shavings (courtesy of the dust collection system). With the lathe running on slow both hands were loaded up with shavings and pressed up to the bat.

I'll post this as a project once I get some more pictures taken but for now this will have to do.

Completed Softball Bats
Yea, a table with baseball bats for legs…

Nice job Chelle.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top