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Hello all,

Over the weekend I was working on an end-grain cutting board made up of Jatoba, Cherry, and Mahogany. After the glue-up, cutting down to size, and sanding, everything looked fine as of Sunday night. I left it alone untreated until the next day. Today (Monday), I can see what looks like small cracks on one side in the wood itself but no issues with the glue lines.

Sleeve Wood Grey Beige Tints and shades


Brown Outerwear Sleeve Wood Grey


Has anyone had this issue before. Is it possible that it shrunk overnight causing the cracks? Could fluctuating humidity levels cause this?

Any solutions are welcome.

Thank you
Larry
 

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See how the cracks are perpendicular to the growth rings. I think that's a clue your wood wasn't dry enough for that particular project. I don't see mahogany in your project.
I've had cracks show up in a beech ends grain board. They closed up after getting soaked with mineral oil.
 

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I agree, looks like checks/cracks to me as well. Typically occurs when the wood dries unevenly. Did you check the moisture content of the wood before you glued it up? Had it been in shop long enough to acclimate?

Unfortunately, I am not aware of an appropriate fix that would still be food safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
See how the cracks are perpendicular to the growth rings. I think that's a clue your wood wasn't dry enough for that particular project. I don't see mahogany in your project.
I've had cracks show up in a beech ends grain board. They closed up after getting soaked with mineral oil.

- Aj2
It's could be a possibility that the wood wasn't dry but unlikely. It was sourced from a reliable lumber yard used and loved by many.

The consensus seems to be that it may close up when soaked in mineral oil which was my next step. Hopefully it does.

Thank you for the input though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I agree, looks like checks/cracks to me as well. Typically occurs when the wood dries unevenly. Did you check the moisture content of the wood before you glued it up? Had it been in shop long enough to acclimate?

Unfortunately, I am not aware of an appropriate fix that would still be food safe.

- cracknpop
This wood was sourced from a very reliable lumber yard used by many craft man. Though it's not out of the realm of possibility it's unlikely. I would need to check the batch.
 

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Guess I'm the odd man out. I recommend General finishes wood bowl finish. It's got a wax component that will seal the end grain. It might take a lot to fill the grain but it works and last forever. Charles Neil recommended this to me. I've got a real hard time questioning him about finishing anything.
 

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Could fluctuating humidity levels cause this?
- onglueme
Jatoba pisses me off to this day and I haven't worked with it for about 15 years!
I've milled/manufactured ten's of thousands of board feet of it. It was all the rage in the late 90's early 2000's. Nothing but CONSTANT stability and service issues. It wasn't just us…it was the flooring companies, cabinets, any type of casework…I finally started refusing any jobs in Jatoba. Might as well just throw your money in the toilet and flush it.
Thankfully it faded out of fashion once everyone realized it was crap in this climate. None of the major vendors here even stock it anymore and they cringe when they get inquiries.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Could fluctuating humidity levels cause this?
- onglueme

Jatoba pisses me off to this day and I haven t worked with it for about 15 years!
I ve milled/manufactured ten s of thousands of board feet of it. It was all the rage in the late 90 s early 2000 s. Nothing but CONSTANT stability and service issues. It wasn t just us…it was the flooring companies, cabinets, any type of casework…I finally started refusing any jobs in Jatoba. Might as well just throw your money in the toilet and flush it.
Thankfully it faded out of fashion once everyone realized it was crap in this climate. None of the major vendors here even stock it anymore and they cringe when they get inquiries.

- Tony_S
Can't argue with years of experience. Thanks, Tony, this is why I turn to this site sometimes. I am hoping mineral oil helps out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Could fluctuating humidity levels cause this?
- onglueme

Jatoba pisses me off to this day and I haven t worked with it for about 15 years!
I ve milled/manufactured ten s of thousands of board feet of it. It was all the rage in the late 90 s early 2000 s. Nothing but CONSTANT stability and service issues. It wasn t just us…it was the flooring companies, cabinets, any type of casework…I finally started refusing any jobs in Jatoba. Might as well just throw your money in the toilet and flush it.
Thankfully it faded out of fashion once everyone realized it was crap in this climate. None of the major vendors here even stock it anymore and they cringe when they get inquiries.

- Tony_S

Can t argue with years of experience. Thanks, Tony, this is why I turn to this site sometimes. I am hoping mineral oil helps out.

- onglueme
I have to say, Tony, it looks like you are absolutely correct. I looked at the board this morning and every Jatoba part has moved in some way. It's as if it's out of its element, not comfortable in the northern parts. I don't know, maybe it's the politics or the climate. I feel like this is a teachable moment where I think it's best if I stay clear of this species, at least when it comes to end grain cutting boards.

Thank you
 
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