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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Zoom-Zoom (and Keeping it dialed in)

I see a lot of great Sketchup tutorials online (here and there), and while they do discuss different techniques, tools and what not - you really have to follow through from start to end, and go along a somewhat complex path to get the hang of things. one more thing - while on that road - one's eyes are focused on the end result, and sometimes one can miss the fantastic little tips along the way.

This tutorial is one of many short - tip/tool specific - tutorials that can help people get around Sketchup and have an easier time around.

Zoom and Center ALL

Sometimes you add a new component to your model (or you're working inside a small part (zoomed in)) and want to see the "whole picture" zoomed across the entire screen, and centered.


This is possible using the 'camera-zoom-extent' feature. click the zoom-extents button
or press SHIFT+Z (this is the default hotkey) and Sketchup will zoom and fit everything in your model into view and center it across your screen:


Zooming and Centering Specific Parts in your Model

Sometimes you want to zoom and center on a specific piece in your model (a specific component, or a specific surface/line/arc/circle/etc). Sketchup can do that too.

Select the part you want to zoom and center upon (in this example, it's the circle for the hole):


right(ctrl for mac)-click on it, and select "zoom-extent", it will zoom and fit that part in the center of your screen:


The later zooming technique is referred to as 'edit-zoom-extent' and can be assigned to a hotkey of your liking- more about that in a later tutorial.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Zoom-Zoom (and Keeping it dialed in)

I see a lot of great Sketchup tutorials online (here and there), and while they do discuss different techniques, tools and what not - you really have to follow through from start to end, and go along a somewhat complex path to get the hang of things. one more thing - while on that road - one's eyes are focused on the end result, and sometimes one can miss the fantastic little tips along the way.

This tutorial is one of many short - tip/tool specific - tutorials that can help people get around Sketchup and have an easier time around.

Zoom and Center ALL

Sometimes you add a new component to your model (or you're working inside a small part (zoomed in)) and want to see the "whole picture" zoomed across the entire screen, and centered.


This is possible using the 'camera-zoom-extent' feature. click the zoom-extents button
or press SHIFT+Z (this is the default hotkey) and Sketchup will zoom and fit everything in your model into view and center it across your screen:


Zooming and Centering Specific Parts in your Model

Sometimes you want to zoom and center on a specific piece in your model (a specific component, or a specific surface/line/arc/circle/etc). Sketchup can do that too.

Select the part you want to zoom and center upon (in this example, it's the circle for the hole):


right(ctrl for mac)-click on it, and select "zoom-extent", it will zoom and fit that part in the center of your screen:


The later zooming technique is referred to as 'edit-zoom-extent' and can be assigned to a hotkey of your liking- more about that in a later tutorial.
DaveR- that is true there is a button in the default toolbar for Zoom Extent.

I find that using hotkeys is the way to go (Photoshop, Maya, Final Cut, Sketchup, you name it) I dont like searching around with my pen/mouse for buttons to click when I can blindly click a hotkey instantly - or better yet - a sequence of hotkeys. this is the equivalent of creating a rectangle in Sketchup by clicking, dragging to the exact sizes in both dimensions, clicking - OR - clicking, typing dimensions, and pressing Enter :) gotta love speed.

I personally hardly ever have toolbars visible on screen (this tutorial wasn't done on MY computer) I find that they take off too much of the real estate that can be used to see more of the actual work surface. I use hotkeys religiously.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Zoom-Zoom (and Keeping it dialed in)

I see a lot of great Sketchup tutorials online (here and there), and while they do discuss different techniques, tools and what not - you really have to follow through from start to end, and go along a somewhat complex path to get the hang of things. one more thing - while on that road - one's eyes are focused on the end result, and sometimes one can miss the fantastic little tips along the way.

This tutorial is one of many short - tip/tool specific - tutorials that can help people get around Sketchup and have an easier time around.

Zoom and Center ALL

Sometimes you add a new component to your model (or you're working inside a small part (zoomed in)) and want to see the "whole picture" zoomed across the entire screen, and centered.


This is possible using the 'camera-zoom-extent' feature. click the zoom-extents button
or press SHIFT+Z (this is the default hotkey) and Sketchup will zoom and fit everything in your model into view and center it across your screen:


Zooming and Centering Specific Parts in your Model

Sometimes you want to zoom and center on a specific piece in your model (a specific component, or a specific surface/line/arc/circle/etc). Sketchup can do that too.

Select the part you want to zoom and center upon (in this example, it's the circle for the hole):


right(ctrl for mac)-click on it, and select "zoom-extent", it will zoom and fit that part in the center of your screen:


The later zooming technique is referred to as 'edit-zoom-extent' and can be assigned to a hotkey of your liking- more about that in a later tutorial.
time for a change ;) just kidding… point taken - added a fix
 

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Zoom-Zoom (and Keeping it dialed in)

I see a lot of great Sketchup tutorials online (here and there), and while they do discuss different techniques, tools and what not - you really have to follow through from start to end, and go along a somewhat complex path to get the hang of things. one more thing - while on that road - one's eyes are focused on the end result, and sometimes one can miss the fantastic little tips along the way.

This tutorial is one of many short - tip/tool specific - tutorials that can help people get around Sketchup and have an easier time around.

Zoom and Center ALL

Sometimes you add a new component to your model (or you're working inside a small part (zoomed in)) and want to see the "whole picture" zoomed across the entire screen, and centered.


This is possible using the 'camera-zoom-extent' feature. click the zoom-extents button
or press SHIFT+Z (this is the default hotkey) and Sketchup will zoom and fit everything in your model into view and center it across your screen:


Zooming and Centering Specific Parts in your Model

Sometimes you want to zoom and center on a specific piece in your model (a specific component, or a specific surface/line/arc/circle/etc). Sketchup can do that too.

Select the part you want to zoom and center upon (in this example, it's the circle for the hole):


right(ctrl for mac)-click on it, and select "zoom-extent", it will zoom and fit that part in the center of your screen:


The later zooming technique is referred to as 'edit-zoom-extent' and can be assigned to a hotkey of your liking- more about that in a later tutorial.
Purplev, have you tried CAD?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Zoom-Zoom (and Keeping it dialed in)

I see a lot of great Sketchup tutorials online (here and there), and while they do discuss different techniques, tools and what not - you really have to follow through from start to end, and go along a somewhat complex path to get the hang of things. one more thing - while on that road - one's eyes are focused on the end result, and sometimes one can miss the fantastic little tips along the way.

This tutorial is one of many short - tip/tool specific - tutorials that can help people get around Sketchup and have an easier time around.

Zoom and Center ALL

Sometimes you add a new component to your model (or you're working inside a small part (zoomed in)) and want to see the "whole picture" zoomed across the entire screen, and centered.


This is possible using the 'camera-zoom-extent' feature. click the zoom-extents button
or press SHIFT+Z (this is the default hotkey) and Sketchup will zoom and fit everything in your model into view and center it across your screen:


Zooming and Centering Specific Parts in your Model

Sometimes you want to zoom and center on a specific piece in your model (a specific component, or a specific surface/line/arc/circle/etc). Sketchup can do that too.

Select the part you want to zoom and center upon (in this example, it's the circle for the hole):


right(ctrl for mac)-click on it, and select "zoom-extent", it will zoom and fit that part in the center of your screen:


The later zooming technique is referred to as 'edit-zoom-extent' and can be assigned to a hotkey of your liking- more about that in a later tutorial.
Doubthead - yes I have. I've also used FormZ, and SolidWorks, but was favoring Maya for my models since I was using it anyways for animation work, and was extremely comfortable with it's environment and controls - I find that Maya is far from being Woodworker friendly, but it was just what I was used to.

When Google bought Sketchup and made it free, I gave it a try, and instantly dumped everything else I was using for woodworking… compared to them all, Sketchup is lightweight, easy to use, inch/metric friendly I like the auto-glue-to-geometry, and is becoming very popular which equals more users sharing more knowledge and models being readily available to cut down on design time.

PS. nice new Avatar ;o)
 

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Zoom-Zoom (and Keeping it dialed in)

I see a lot of great Sketchup tutorials online (here and there), and while they do discuss different techniques, tools and what not - you really have to follow through from start to end, and go along a somewhat complex path to get the hang of things. one more thing - while on that road - one's eyes are focused on the end result, and sometimes one can miss the fantastic little tips along the way.

This tutorial is one of many short - tip/tool specific - tutorials that can help people get around Sketchup and have an easier time around.

Zoom and Center ALL

Sometimes you add a new component to your model (or you're working inside a small part (zoomed in)) and want to see the "whole picture" zoomed across the entire screen, and centered.


This is possible using the 'camera-zoom-extent' feature. click the zoom-extents button
or press SHIFT+Z (this is the default hotkey) and Sketchup will zoom and fit everything in your model into view and center it across your screen:


Zooming and Centering Specific Parts in your Model

Sometimes you want to zoom and center on a specific piece in your model (a specific component, or a specific surface/line/arc/circle/etc). Sketchup can do that too.

Select the part you want to zoom and center upon (in this example, it's the circle for the hole):


right(ctrl for mac)-click on it, and select "zoom-extent", it will zoom and fit that part in the center of your screen:


The later zooming technique is referred to as 'edit-zoom-extent' and can be assigned to a hotkey of your liking- more about that in a later tutorial.
lol…..in the middle of the jungle!
 

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Zoom-Zoom (and Keeping it dialed in)

I see a lot of great Sketchup tutorials online (here and there), and while they do discuss different techniques, tools and what not - you really have to follow through from start to end, and go along a somewhat complex path to get the hang of things. one more thing - while on that road - one's eyes are focused on the end result, and sometimes one can miss the fantastic little tips along the way.

This tutorial is one of many short - tip/tool specific - tutorials that can help people get around Sketchup and have an easier time around.

Zoom and Center ALL

Sometimes you add a new component to your model (or you're working inside a small part (zoomed in)) and want to see the "whole picture" zoomed across the entire screen, and centered.


This is possible using the 'camera-zoom-extent' feature. click the zoom-extents button
or press SHIFT+Z (this is the default hotkey) and Sketchup will zoom and fit everything in your model into view and center it across your screen:


Zooming and Centering Specific Parts in your Model

Sometimes you want to zoom and center on a specific piece in your model (a specific component, or a specific surface/line/arc/circle/etc). Sketchup can do that too.

Select the part you want to zoom and center upon (in this example, it's the circle for the hole):


right(ctrl for mac)-click on it, and select "zoom-extent", it will zoom and fit that part in the center of your screen:


The later zooming technique is referred to as 'edit-zoom-extent' and can be assigned to a hotkey of your liking- more about that in a later tutorial.
Great article, though I am keen for my staff to gain knowledge of program through face to face training. This approach will ensure that they can use the tools properly. Your guidance may used as a prompt in the future. Well done!
 

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Zoom-Zoom (and Keeping it dialed in)

I see a lot of great Sketchup tutorials online (here and there), and while they do discuss different techniques, tools and what not - you really have to follow through from start to end, and go along a somewhat complex path to get the hang of things. one more thing - while on that road - one's eyes are focused on the end result, and sometimes one can miss the fantastic little tips along the way.

This tutorial is one of many short - tip/tool specific - tutorials that can help people get around Sketchup and have an easier time around.

Zoom and Center ALL

Sometimes you add a new component to your model (or you're working inside a small part (zoomed in)) and want to see the "whole picture" zoomed across the entire screen, and centered.


This is possible using the 'camera-zoom-extent' feature. click the zoom-extents button
or press SHIFT+Z (this is the default hotkey) and Sketchup will zoom and fit everything in your model into view and center it across your screen:


Zooming and Centering Specific Parts in your Model

Sometimes you want to zoom and center on a specific piece in your model (a specific component, or a specific surface/line/arc/circle/etc). Sketchup can do that too.

Select the part you want to zoom and center upon (in this example, it's the circle for the hole):


right(ctrl for mac)-click on it, and select "zoom-extent", it will zoom and fit that part in the center of your screen:


The later zooming technique is referred to as 'edit-zoom-extent' and can be assigned to a hotkey of your liking- more about that in a later tutorial.
Thanks for the enlightenment and again for the great tutorials.
 

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Zoom-Zoom (and Keeping it dialed in)

I see a lot of great Sketchup tutorials online (here and there), and while they do discuss different techniques, tools and what not - you really have to follow through from start to end, and go along a somewhat complex path to get the hang of things. one more thing - while on that road - one's eyes are focused on the end result, and sometimes one can miss the fantastic little tips along the way.

This tutorial is one of many short - tip/tool specific - tutorials that can help people get around Sketchup and have an easier time around.

Zoom and Center ALL

Sometimes you add a new component to your model (or you're working inside a small part (zoomed in)) and want to see the "whole picture" zoomed across the entire screen, and centered.


This is possible using the 'camera-zoom-extent' feature. click the zoom-extents button
or press SHIFT+Z (this is the default hotkey) and Sketchup will zoom and fit everything in your model into view and center it across your screen:


Zooming and Centering Specific Parts in your Model

Sometimes you want to zoom and center on a specific piece in your model (a specific component, or a specific surface/line/arc/circle/etc). Sketchup can do that too.

Select the part you want to zoom and center upon (in this example, it's the circle for the hole):


right(ctrl for mac)-click on it, and select "zoom-extent", it will zoom and fit that part in the center of your screen:


The later zooming technique is referred to as 'edit-zoom-extent' and can be assigned to a hotkey of your liking- more about that in a later tutorial.
I like the scalability of AutoCad but for 'everyday' basic drawings I find SketchUp easier to use. Great tutorial by the way, thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Zoom-Zoom (and Keeping it dialed in)

I see a lot of great Sketchup tutorials online (here and there), and while they do discuss different techniques, tools and what not - you really have to follow through from start to end, and go along a somewhat complex path to get the hang of things. one more thing - while on that road - one's eyes are focused on the end result, and sometimes one can miss the fantastic little tips along the way.

This tutorial is one of many short - tip/tool specific - tutorials that can help people get around Sketchup and have an easier time around.

Zoom and Center ALL

Sometimes you add a new component to your model (or you're working inside a small part (zoomed in)) and want to see the "whole picture" zoomed across the entire screen, and centered.


This is possible using the 'camera-zoom-extent' feature. click the zoom-extents button
or press SHIFT+Z (this is the default hotkey) and Sketchup will zoom and fit everything in your model into view and center it across your screen:


Zooming and Centering Specific Parts in your Model

Sometimes you want to zoom and center on a specific piece in your model (a specific component, or a specific surface/line/arc/circle/etc). Sketchup can do that too.

Select the part you want to zoom and center upon (in this example, it's the circle for the hole):


right(ctrl for mac)-click on it, and select "zoom-extent", it will zoom and fit that part in the center of your screen:


The later zooming technique is referred to as 'edit-zoom-extent' and can be assigned to a hotkey of your liking- more about that in a later tutorial.
I find all modeling apps have their uses, but for everyday throwing things together for woodworking purposes, I think SU is just the lightest and easiest to use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Outliner - Component Selection - Anywhere, Anytime

Is there an easier way to select components/groups that are behind another geometry? or inside one?
Is there a way to transfer a component from one group to another?

Yes there is. Welcome the Outliner window.

This tutorial refers to components in your model, but in this case, groups behave in the exact same manner.

If not yet visible, click "Window → Outliner" to see this window in Sketchup.

The Outliner window shows you a list of all components and groups in your model in a tree view - meaning, each sub component is shown within it's container (parent) component/group so that it's easy to make the parts that make the whole (think legs and top components within a table component/group)



One thing that is convenient with using the Outliner window, is that you can select components and sub components directly - without having to visually "aim" and clicking them - simply click the component name in the Outliner window, and it will be selected - even if it's inside a different component/group. Double click it in the Outliner Window - and you're in Component Edit mode! in a Snap!

Another powerful usage of the Outliner window is the ability to move sub-components from one group to another.

As shown in the following picture, the label on this model is a component within the model's parent component. if you move the model, the label moves with it (as it is contained within it and is part of it):


By selecting the label sub-component and dragging it outside the model's component in the Outliner Window we are literally taking it out of the model's component, and making it a free stand-alone component, if we will now move the model's component - the label will not move with it as it is no longer part of the model's component:


This way you can easily navigate through your components (another great excuse/reason to use components in Sketchup) and sub components, without having to rely on your angle of view, hiding other components that are in the way, or having to "copy-paste" with exact positioning to move components from one container to another.
 

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Outliner - Component Selection - Anywhere, Anytime

Is there an easier way to select components/groups that are behind another geometry? or inside one?
Is there a way to transfer a component from one group to another?

Yes there is. Welcome the Outliner window.

This tutorial refers to components in your model, but in this case, groups behave in the exact same manner.

If not yet visible, click "Window → Outliner" to see this window in Sketchup.

The Outliner window shows you a list of all components and groups in your model in a tree view - meaning, each sub component is shown within it's container (parent) component/group so that it's easy to make the parts that make the whole (think legs and top components within a table component/group)



One thing that is convenient with using the Outliner window, is that you can select components and sub components directly - without having to visually "aim" and clicking them - simply click the component name in the Outliner window, and it will be selected - even if it's inside a different component/group. Double click it in the Outliner Window - and you're in Component Edit mode! in a Snap!

Another powerful usage of the Outliner window is the ability to move sub-components from one group to another.

As shown in the following picture, the label on this model is a component within the model's parent component. if you move the model, the label moves with it (as it is contained within it and is part of it):


By selecting the label sub-component and dragging it outside the model's component in the Outliner Window we are literally taking it out of the model's component, and making it a free stand-alone component, if we will now move the model's component - the label will not move with it as it is no longer part of the model's component:


This way you can easily navigate through your components (another great excuse/reason to use components in Sketchup) and sub components, without having to rely on your angle of view, hiding other components that are in the way, or having to "copy-paste" with exact positioning to move components from one container to another.
Clever and how easy does this appear when using a simple user friendly program.
 

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Outliner - Component Selection - Anywhere, Anytime

Is there an easier way to select components/groups that are behind another geometry? or inside one?
Is there a way to transfer a component from one group to another?

Yes there is. Welcome the Outliner window.

This tutorial refers to components in your model, but in this case, groups behave in the exact same manner.

If not yet visible, click "Window → Outliner" to see this window in Sketchup.

The Outliner window shows you a list of all components and groups in your model in a tree view - meaning, each sub component is shown within it's container (parent) component/group so that it's easy to make the parts that make the whole (think legs and top components within a table component/group)



One thing that is convenient with using the Outliner window, is that you can select components and sub components directly - without having to visually "aim" and clicking them - simply click the component name in the Outliner window, and it will be selected - even if it's inside a different component/group. Double click it in the Outliner Window - and you're in Component Edit mode! in a Snap!

Another powerful usage of the Outliner window is the ability to move sub-components from one group to another.

As shown in the following picture, the label on this model is a component within the model's parent component. if you move the model, the label moves with it (as it is contained within it and is part of it):


By selecting the label sub-component and dragging it outside the model's component in the Outliner Window we are literally taking it out of the model's component, and making it a free stand-alone component, if we will now move the model's component - the label will not move with it as it is no longer part of the model's component:


This way you can easily navigate through your components (another great excuse/reason to use components in Sketchup) and sub components, without having to rely on your angle of view, hiding other components that are in the way, or having to "copy-paste" with exact positioning to move components from one container to another.
It looks very clever, perhaps too clever for little old me. Has anyone tried using it themselves?
 

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Outliner - Component Selection - Anywhere, Anytime

Is there an easier way to select components/groups that are behind another geometry? or inside one?
Is there a way to transfer a component from one group to another?

Yes there is. Welcome the Outliner window.

This tutorial refers to components in your model, but in this case, groups behave in the exact same manner.

If not yet visible, click "Window → Outliner" to see this window in Sketchup.

The Outliner window shows you a list of all components and groups in your model in a tree view - meaning, each sub component is shown within it's container (parent) component/group so that it's easy to make the parts that make the whole (think legs and top components within a table component/group)



One thing that is convenient with using the Outliner window, is that you can select components and sub components directly - without having to visually "aim" and clicking them - simply click the component name in the Outliner window, and it will be selected - even if it's inside a different component/group. Double click it in the Outliner Window - and you're in Component Edit mode! in a Snap!

Another powerful usage of the Outliner window is the ability to move sub-components from one group to another.

As shown in the following picture, the label on this model is a component within the model's parent component. if you move the model, the label moves with it (as it is contained within it and is part of it):


By selecting the label sub-component and dragging it outside the model's component in the Outliner Window we are literally taking it out of the model's component, and making it a free stand-alone component, if we will now move the model's component - the label will not move with it as it is no longer part of the model's component:


This way you can easily navigate through your components (another great excuse/reason to use components in Sketchup) and sub components, without having to rely on your angle of view, hiding other components that are in the way, or having to "copy-paste" with exact positioning to move components from one container to another.
Makes sense - much like how layers behave in Photoshop. Very different I know, but they both have the same basic principles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Going to the Lumberyard - Virtually

so you wanted to use specific materials in your Sketchup project? exotic/local lumber? metals? leather? other?

I saw this subject raised in one of DaveR's latest blogs, and it's a fairly simple thing to do in Sketchup. You can use any material you so desire in sketchup, but first, we need to 'make' that material.

Creating new Materials in Sketchup (Using live materials as source)

1. get your material 'source' - this can be any photo - either from your digital camera, or do an online search for your desired material and look for a photo that resembles what you want it to look like, in this example, I've googled 'birdseye maple':


I copied the one that I liked (I dragged it to my desktop, but you could also right(ctrl for mac)-click and do "save as") to my desktop. and then opened Sketchup.

In Sketchup I made a simple box for this example, and opened the paint palette window (paint bucket tool). I then selected my wood folder (or any other folder you might want to place your material into for organization purposes) and selected color->new Texture:



A window will open asking you for the source image/photo for this new material:



simply browse and select the material photo you've downloaded to your desktop.

Sketchup will ask you to confirm/modify the size of the new texture - you could leave this as is, or modify it and resize it as you see fit (experience will tell you what and how you'd want to modify this) and also prompt you for the name of the material - in this case, I'll call it Birdseye Maple … seems so fit.

you can now select a face, and use the new material to paint it with:



As Simple As That.

PS you can also reposition the texture after you've applied it to a face/geometry, and resize it per face.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Going to the Lumberyard - Virtually

so you wanted to use specific materials in your Sketchup project? exotic/local lumber? metals? leather? other?

I saw this subject raised in one of DaveR's latest blogs, and it's a fairly simple thing to do in Sketchup. You can use any material you so desire in sketchup, but first, we need to 'make' that material.

Creating new Materials in Sketchup (Using live materials as source)

1. get your material 'source' - this can be any photo - either from your digital camera, or do an online search for your desired material and look for a photo that resembles what you want it to look like, in this example, I've googled 'birdseye maple':


I copied the one that I liked (I dragged it to my desktop, but you could also right(ctrl for mac)-click and do "save as") to my desktop. and then opened Sketchup.

In Sketchup I made a simple box for this example, and opened the paint palette window (paint bucket tool). I then selected my wood folder (or any other folder you might want to place your material into for organization purposes) and selected color->new Texture:



A window will open asking you for the source image/photo for this new material:



simply browse and select the material photo you've downloaded to your desktop.

Sketchup will ask you to confirm/modify the size of the new texture - you could leave this as is, or modify it and resize it as you see fit (experience will tell you what and how you'd want to modify this) and also prompt you for the name of the material - in this case, I'll call it Birdseye Maple … seems so fit.

you can now select a face, and use the new material to paint it with:



As Simple As That.

PS you can also reposition the texture after you've applied it to a face/geometry, and resize it per face.
it actually scales up with the piece. from my experience, this is how the rest of (default) materials behave…

I rarely use materials- I mostly use sketchup for roughing up and detailing dimensions and joinery my woodworking models are usually left unpainted (unfinished if you would). I do however paint models that I want to present to someone else, or models that are published.

out of curiosity - what do your materials look like when you scale the box?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Going to the Lumberyard - Virtually

so you wanted to use specific materials in your Sketchup project? exotic/local lumber? metals? leather? other?

I saw this subject raised in one of DaveR's latest blogs, and it's a fairly simple thing to do in Sketchup. You can use any material you so desire in sketchup, but first, we need to 'make' that material.

Creating new Materials in Sketchup (Using live materials as source)

1. get your material 'source' - this can be any photo - either from your digital camera, or do an online search for your desired material and look for a photo that resembles what you want it to look like, in this example, I've googled 'birdseye maple':


I copied the one that I liked (I dragged it to my desktop, but you could also right(ctrl for mac)-click and do "save as") to my desktop. and then opened Sketchup.

In Sketchup I made a simple box for this example, and opened the paint palette window (paint bucket tool). I then selected my wood folder (or any other folder you might want to place your material into for organization purposes) and selected color->new Texture:



A window will open asking you for the source image/photo for this new material:



simply browse and select the material photo you've downloaded to your desktop.

Sketchup will ask you to confirm/modify the size of the new texture - you could leave this as is, or modify it and resize it as you see fit (experience will tell you what and how you'd want to modify this) and also prompt you for the name of the material - in this case, I'll call it Birdseye Maple … seems so fit.

you can now select a face, and use the new material to paint it with:



As Simple As That.

PS you can also reposition the texture after you've applied it to a face/geometry, and resize it per face.
I see your point, in this case, depending on the source image there might be some tile-effect to it, in this example, I did choose a source image that was somewhat clean and wouldn't show much of the tile-effect when spread around a face that is larger than the original source image (I guess It's a habit) but it would need some touchups in photoshop to make it tile-proof - but that is another tutorial for another time I guess :) but it is a good point.

here is the material spread across an large area - you can see the tile effect even though in this case its minimized:


and here it is slightly cleaned up:


but it still shows the repetition. do you birdseye maple material that presents a cleaner appearance? (you can always play with the scaling of the material, and positioning to get a better looking result)
 

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Going to the Lumberyard - Virtually

so you wanted to use specific materials in your Sketchup project? exotic/local lumber? metals? leather? other?

I saw this subject raised in one of DaveR's latest blogs, and it's a fairly simple thing to do in Sketchup. You can use any material you so desire in sketchup, but first, we need to 'make' that material.

Creating new Materials in Sketchup (Using live materials as source)

1. get your material 'source' - this can be any photo - either from your digital camera, or do an online search for your desired material and look for a photo that resembles what you want it to look like, in this example, I've googled 'birdseye maple':


I copied the one that I liked (I dragged it to my desktop, but you could also right(ctrl for mac)-click and do "save as") to my desktop. and then opened Sketchup.

In Sketchup I made a simple box for this example, and opened the paint palette window (paint bucket tool). I then selected my wood folder (or any other folder you might want to place your material into for organization purposes) and selected color->new Texture:



A window will open asking you for the source image/photo for this new material:



simply browse and select the material photo you've downloaded to your desktop.

Sketchup will ask you to confirm/modify the size of the new texture - you could leave this as is, or modify it and resize it as you see fit (experience will tell you what and how you'd want to modify this) and also prompt you for the name of the material - in this case, I'll call it Birdseye Maple … seems so fit.

you can now select a face, and use the new material to paint it with:



As Simple As That.

PS you can also reposition the texture after you've applied it to a face/geometry, and resize it per face.
Ya tiling drives me crazy! You can find the nicest texture and then by the time you get it applied scaled and looking close to how you want it it looks fake because of tiling. Allot of the guys on the Podium forum are real good with photo shop and they make all their own seamless textures. I have read a few tutorials on how to apply a texture to a large surface and then make the seams go away but I'm not that handy with photo shop!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Going to the Lumberyard - Virtually

so you wanted to use specific materials in your Sketchup project? exotic/local lumber? metals? leather? other?

I saw this subject raised in one of DaveR's latest blogs, and it's a fairly simple thing to do in Sketchup. You can use any material you so desire in sketchup, but first, we need to 'make' that material.

Creating new Materials in Sketchup (Using live materials as source)

1. get your material 'source' - this can be any photo - either from your digital camera, or do an online search for your desired material and look for a photo that resembles what you want it to look like, in this example, I've googled 'birdseye maple':


I copied the one that I liked (I dragged it to my desktop, but you could also right(ctrl for mac)-click and do "save as") to my desktop. and then opened Sketchup.

In Sketchup I made a simple box for this example, and opened the paint palette window (paint bucket tool). I then selected my wood folder (or any other folder you might want to place your material into for organization purposes) and selected color->new Texture:



A window will open asking you for the source image/photo for this new material:



simply browse and select the material photo you've downloaded to your desktop.

Sketchup will ask you to confirm/modify the size of the new texture - you could leave this as is, or modify it and resize it as you see fit (experience will tell you what and how you'd want to modify this) and also prompt you for the name of the material - in this case, I'll call it Birdseye Maple … seems so fit.

you can now select a face, and use the new material to paint it with:



As Simple As That.

PS you can also reposition the texture after you've applied it to a face/geometry, and resize it per face.
Thanks Dave, you just saved me a bunch-load of money on exotic lumber that I was going to shell out for… ;o)

it is true though about distinctive grain materials - the more distinctive the pattern in , the harder it is to hide the seams. in this case, it is much like woodworking - you have to custom make the materials for specific parts for best results, use a larger source image with more detail to cover a larger area, prepare custom made images in photoshop for each piece you work on etc. this is much like working in Maya for animation where (almost) every component uses a custom material with custom-made projected images (both for colors, patterns, and alpha channels - thats a ton of source images for materials for every project, but it pays off).

the original post was though to introduce people to the simple fact that it's possible, and quite easy to use your very own materials that you can create in a few seconds - some will be seamless, some can be made seamless, and others - well, it is SKETCH up after all. we're not trying to create a perfect world (we are , but for sake of argument lets say we're not)
 

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Going to the Lumberyard - Virtually

so you wanted to use specific materials in your Sketchup project? exotic/local lumber? metals? leather? other?

I saw this subject raised in one of DaveR's latest blogs, and it's a fairly simple thing to do in Sketchup. You can use any material you so desire in sketchup, but first, we need to 'make' that material.

Creating new Materials in Sketchup (Using live materials as source)

1. get your material 'source' - this can be any photo - either from your digital camera, or do an online search for your desired material and look for a photo that resembles what you want it to look like, in this example, I've googled 'birdseye maple':


I copied the one that I liked (I dragged it to my desktop, but you could also right(ctrl for mac)-click and do "save as") to my desktop. and then opened Sketchup.

In Sketchup I made a simple box for this example, and opened the paint palette window (paint bucket tool). I then selected my wood folder (or any other folder you might want to place your material into for organization purposes) and selected color->new Texture:



A window will open asking you for the source image/photo for this new material:



simply browse and select the material photo you've downloaded to your desktop.

Sketchup will ask you to confirm/modify the size of the new texture - you could leave this as is, or modify it and resize it as you see fit (experience will tell you what and how you'd want to modify this) and also prompt you for the name of the material - in this case, I'll call it Birdseye Maple … seems so fit.

you can now select a face, and use the new material to paint it with:



As Simple As That.

PS you can also reposition the texture after you've applied it to a face/geometry, and resize it per face.
Thanks, this is helpful.
 
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