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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Making Cabinet Doors With The Follow Me Tool

Hello everyone! Since I discovered Sketchup several years ago (I have been Skecthing since release 3..pre Google) I have spent a great deal of time watching tutorials and prowling through the forums trying to learn as much about this great software as I can! Since I have been a member here I have seen some great blogs by other members about Sketchup and how to use it, so I thought I would throw my hat in the ring! I see allot of people saying I wish I could use Sketchup better, or I gotta learn Sketchup. I personally think it is one of the best tools you can use for designing woodworking and furniture projects. So I want to write this blog to try and get some of you interested in learning how to use this great tool, and to share some of the tricks and knowledge I have picked up along the way to make everyone love this software as much as I do! To me this is as important as any tool I have in my shop!

I found this little trick in the SU forum I wish I could remember who posted the original idea..I even went back and searched for it so I could give the guy credit, but I couldn't find the thread…so let me say that I DID NOT THINK OF THIS..although I wish I had 'cause it's pretty neat!. But anyways this is the coolest way to make cabinet doors I have seen yet. Oh sure, you could draw all your parts and put them together but that could be time consuming and not as much fun as this method! So here goes..I wish the pics could be larger, but we are limited to 640×480, but I think you can get the idea of what I am trying to do here. Lets start off with a simple flat panel door

First. draw a rectangle the dimensions being that of the cabinet door you would like to make. This door is 12"x30"
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Next, draw the profile of the door parts 2D as if cut in half. This door has 2" wide stiles and rails 1" thick, and a 1/4" flat panel center thats 8" wide. Don't bother with detailing the groves or joinery it wont be seen. But if you want any profiles or fancy edges on the rails and styles you would want to have that included.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, next select all the geometry associated with the door profile (an easy way to select all touching geometry is to triple click) then you want to rotate your door profile so its standing perfectly vertical. You do this with the rotate tool
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, now here comes the fun part..while all the geometry is still selected grab the bottom corner of the profile with the move tool and move it to the center of the left hand vertical line in your size rectangle.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Now, select the follow me tool, and click on the face of your door profile. Then, you start to move it around the door size outline following the edges. Sometimes the tool wigs out a little and you will get a weird looking result…don't worry just click undo and try again. It takes a little practice to get used to the follow me tool.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Finish by clicking back where you started and if you did it correctly, you should have something that looks like this…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then get out your trusty eraser, and erase the uneeded lines and you should have this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
I know some of you guys are saying "wheres the rail and stile ends"...I hear ya man..just get out the line tool and draw them in and presto..instant flat panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
You could copy that one door as many times as you needed and then use the scale tool to resize it for the other cabinets, but I find if your not careful with the scale tool it changes other dimensions that you dont want changed. I think it would be just as easy to use this method to create one of each door size then copy them as needded.

So now your saying "works ok for a plain flat panel but what about a raised panel" Well lets try one..
Same size rectangle as the one we used before…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The door profile is the same only I have a 2" bevel from the center of half the panel in to the frame
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Move that onto your size rectangle, snapping the lower corner to the center mark..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then, use the follow me tool just like the last door..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
If all the planets were in alignment (and your follow me tool was also) you should have a result that looks like this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Once again we turn to Mr. eraser, carefully remove the uneeded lines (not your bevels), and draw in you rail and stile ends and just like that, before the cat has a chance to choke up a hairball you have a raised panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Pretty neat huh? I thought it was when I read the original thread. You can get as fancy or as plain as you want with rail and stile edges ( coves, beads, round overs), and raised panel design just draw it in the door profile. If you rotate the door around you will notice there is no bottom on it, but most of the time if your doing a cabinet or kitchen model your only going to see the front anyways. Now go crank up your copy of Sketchup and make some doors!
 

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199 Posts
Making Cabinet Doors With The Follow Me Tool

Hello everyone! Since I discovered Sketchup several years ago (I have been Skecthing since release 3..pre Google) I have spent a great deal of time watching tutorials and prowling through the forums trying to learn as much about this great software as I can! Since I have been a member here I have seen some great blogs by other members about Sketchup and how to use it, so I thought I would throw my hat in the ring! I see allot of people saying I wish I could use Sketchup better, or I gotta learn Sketchup. I personally think it is one of the best tools you can use for designing woodworking and furniture projects. So I want to write this blog to try and get some of you interested in learning how to use this great tool, and to share some of the tricks and knowledge I have picked up along the way to make everyone love this software as much as I do! To me this is as important as any tool I have in my shop!

I found this little trick in the SU forum I wish I could remember who posted the original idea..I even went back and searched for it so I could give the guy credit, but I couldn't find the thread…so let me say that I DID NOT THINK OF THIS..although I wish I had 'cause it's pretty neat!. But anyways this is the coolest way to make cabinet doors I have seen yet. Oh sure, you could draw all your parts and put them together but that could be time consuming and not as much fun as this method! So here goes..I wish the pics could be larger, but we are limited to 640×480, but I think you can get the idea of what I am trying to do here. Lets start off with a simple flat panel door

First. draw a rectangle the dimensions being that of the cabinet door you would like to make. This door is 12"x30"
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Next, draw the profile of the door parts 2D as if cut in half. This door has 2" wide stiles and rails 1" thick, and a 1/4" flat panel center thats 8" wide. Don't bother with detailing the groves or joinery it wont be seen. But if you want any profiles or fancy edges on the rails and styles you would want to have that included.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, next select all the geometry associated with the door profile (an easy way to select all touching geometry is to triple click) then you want to rotate your door profile so its standing perfectly vertical. You do this with the rotate tool
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, now here comes the fun part..while all the geometry is still selected grab the bottom corner of the profile with the move tool and move it to the center of the left hand vertical line in your size rectangle.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Now, select the follow me tool, and click on the face of your door profile. Then, you start to move it around the door size outline following the edges. Sometimes the tool wigs out a little and you will get a weird looking result…don't worry just click undo and try again. It takes a little practice to get used to the follow me tool.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Finish by clicking back where you started and if you did it correctly, you should have something that looks like this…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then get out your trusty eraser, and erase the uneeded lines and you should have this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
I know some of you guys are saying "wheres the rail and stile ends"...I hear ya man..just get out the line tool and draw them in and presto..instant flat panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
You could copy that one door as many times as you needed and then use the scale tool to resize it for the other cabinets, but I find if your not careful with the scale tool it changes other dimensions that you dont want changed. I think it would be just as easy to use this method to create one of each door size then copy them as needded.

So now your saying "works ok for a plain flat panel but what about a raised panel" Well lets try one..
Same size rectangle as the one we used before…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The door profile is the same only I have a 2" bevel from the center of half the panel in to the frame
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Move that onto your size rectangle, snapping the lower corner to the center mark..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then, use the follow me tool just like the last door..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
If all the planets were in alignment (and your follow me tool was also) you should have a result that looks like this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Once again we turn to Mr. eraser, carefully remove the uneeded lines (not your bevels), and draw in you rail and stile ends and just like that, before the cat has a chance to choke up a hairball you have a raised panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Pretty neat huh? I thought it was when I read the original thread. You can get as fancy or as plain as you want with rail and stile edges ( coves, beads, round overs), and raised panel design just draw it in the door profile. If you rotate the door around you will notice there is no bottom on it, but most of the time if your doing a cabinet or kitchen model your only going to see the front anyways. Now go crank up your copy of Sketchup and make some doors!
Thanks for the tip. I have been trying to learn sketchup, however, I'm faster with paper and pencil and the frustration level is way low with the pencil.
 

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570 Posts
Making Cabinet Doors With The Follow Me Tool

Hello everyone! Since I discovered Sketchup several years ago (I have been Skecthing since release 3..pre Google) I have spent a great deal of time watching tutorials and prowling through the forums trying to learn as much about this great software as I can! Since I have been a member here I have seen some great blogs by other members about Sketchup and how to use it, so I thought I would throw my hat in the ring! I see allot of people saying I wish I could use Sketchup better, or I gotta learn Sketchup. I personally think it is one of the best tools you can use for designing woodworking and furniture projects. So I want to write this blog to try and get some of you interested in learning how to use this great tool, and to share some of the tricks and knowledge I have picked up along the way to make everyone love this software as much as I do! To me this is as important as any tool I have in my shop!

I found this little trick in the SU forum I wish I could remember who posted the original idea..I even went back and searched for it so I could give the guy credit, but I couldn't find the thread…so let me say that I DID NOT THINK OF THIS..although I wish I had 'cause it's pretty neat!. But anyways this is the coolest way to make cabinet doors I have seen yet. Oh sure, you could draw all your parts and put them together but that could be time consuming and not as much fun as this method! So here goes..I wish the pics could be larger, but we are limited to 640×480, but I think you can get the idea of what I am trying to do here. Lets start off with a simple flat panel door

First. draw a rectangle the dimensions being that of the cabinet door you would like to make. This door is 12"x30"
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Next, draw the profile of the door parts 2D as if cut in half. This door has 2" wide stiles and rails 1" thick, and a 1/4" flat panel center thats 8" wide. Don't bother with detailing the groves or joinery it wont be seen. But if you want any profiles or fancy edges on the rails and styles you would want to have that included.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, next select all the geometry associated with the door profile (an easy way to select all touching geometry is to triple click) then you want to rotate your door profile so its standing perfectly vertical. You do this with the rotate tool
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, now here comes the fun part..while all the geometry is still selected grab the bottom corner of the profile with the move tool and move it to the center of the left hand vertical line in your size rectangle.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Now, select the follow me tool, and click on the face of your door profile. Then, you start to move it around the door size outline following the edges. Sometimes the tool wigs out a little and you will get a weird looking result…don't worry just click undo and try again. It takes a little practice to get used to the follow me tool.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Finish by clicking back where you started and if you did it correctly, you should have something that looks like this…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then get out your trusty eraser, and erase the uneeded lines and you should have this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
I know some of you guys are saying "wheres the rail and stile ends"...I hear ya man..just get out the line tool and draw them in and presto..instant flat panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
You could copy that one door as many times as you needed and then use the scale tool to resize it for the other cabinets, but I find if your not careful with the scale tool it changes other dimensions that you dont want changed. I think it would be just as easy to use this method to create one of each door size then copy them as needded.

So now your saying "works ok for a plain flat panel but what about a raised panel" Well lets try one..
Same size rectangle as the one we used before…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The door profile is the same only I have a 2" bevel from the center of half the panel in to the frame
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Move that onto your size rectangle, snapping the lower corner to the center mark..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then, use the follow me tool just like the last door..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
If all the planets were in alignment (and your follow me tool was also) you should have a result that looks like this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Once again we turn to Mr. eraser, carefully remove the uneeded lines (not your bevels), and draw in you rail and stile ends and just like that, before the cat has a chance to choke up a hairball you have a raised panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Pretty neat huh? I thought it was when I read the original thread. You can get as fancy or as plain as you want with rail and stile edges ( coves, beads, round overs), and raised panel design just draw it in the door profile. If you rotate the door around you will notice there is no bottom on it, but most of the time if your doing a cabinet or kitchen model your only going to see the front anyways. Now go crank up your copy of Sketchup and make some doors!
That is pretty cool, thanks for that tip.

I know there are smarter / more productive ways to use sketchup. Mostly I've been using it the draw it a line at a time method, kind of like 2d drafting in 3d. I like seeing these tips, it helps break me out of old mindsets.
 

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Registered
Joined
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2,182 Posts
Making Cabinet Doors With The Follow Me Tool

Hello everyone! Since I discovered Sketchup several years ago (I have been Skecthing since release 3..pre Google) I have spent a great deal of time watching tutorials and prowling through the forums trying to learn as much about this great software as I can! Since I have been a member here I have seen some great blogs by other members about Sketchup and how to use it, so I thought I would throw my hat in the ring! I see allot of people saying I wish I could use Sketchup better, or I gotta learn Sketchup. I personally think it is one of the best tools you can use for designing woodworking and furniture projects. So I want to write this blog to try and get some of you interested in learning how to use this great tool, and to share some of the tricks and knowledge I have picked up along the way to make everyone love this software as much as I do! To me this is as important as any tool I have in my shop!

I found this little trick in the SU forum I wish I could remember who posted the original idea..I even went back and searched for it so I could give the guy credit, but I couldn't find the thread…so let me say that I DID NOT THINK OF THIS..although I wish I had 'cause it's pretty neat!. But anyways this is the coolest way to make cabinet doors I have seen yet. Oh sure, you could draw all your parts and put them together but that could be time consuming and not as much fun as this method! So here goes..I wish the pics could be larger, but we are limited to 640×480, but I think you can get the idea of what I am trying to do here. Lets start off with a simple flat panel door

First. draw a rectangle the dimensions being that of the cabinet door you would like to make. This door is 12"x30"
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Next, draw the profile of the door parts 2D as if cut in half. This door has 2" wide stiles and rails 1" thick, and a 1/4" flat panel center thats 8" wide. Don't bother with detailing the groves or joinery it wont be seen. But if you want any profiles or fancy edges on the rails and styles you would want to have that included.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, next select all the geometry associated with the door profile (an easy way to select all touching geometry is to triple click) then you want to rotate your door profile so its standing perfectly vertical. You do this with the rotate tool
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, now here comes the fun part..while all the geometry is still selected grab the bottom corner of the profile with the move tool and move it to the center of the left hand vertical line in your size rectangle.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Now, select the follow me tool, and click on the face of your door profile. Then, you start to move it around the door size outline following the edges. Sometimes the tool wigs out a little and you will get a weird looking result…don't worry just click undo and try again. It takes a little practice to get used to the follow me tool.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Finish by clicking back where you started and if you did it correctly, you should have something that looks like this…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then get out your trusty eraser, and erase the uneeded lines and you should have this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
I know some of you guys are saying "wheres the rail and stile ends"...I hear ya man..just get out the line tool and draw them in and presto..instant flat panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
You could copy that one door as many times as you needed and then use the scale tool to resize it for the other cabinets, but I find if your not careful with the scale tool it changes other dimensions that you dont want changed. I think it would be just as easy to use this method to create one of each door size then copy them as needded.

So now your saying "works ok for a plain flat panel but what about a raised panel" Well lets try one..
Same size rectangle as the one we used before…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The door profile is the same only I have a 2" bevel from the center of half the panel in to the frame
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Move that onto your size rectangle, snapping the lower corner to the center mark..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then, use the follow me tool just like the last door..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
If all the planets were in alignment (and your follow me tool was also) you should have a result that looks like this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Once again we turn to Mr. eraser, carefully remove the uneeded lines (not your bevels), and draw in you rail and stile ends and just like that, before the cat has a chance to choke up a hairball you have a raised panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Pretty neat huh? I thought it was when I read the original thread. You can get as fancy or as plain as you want with rail and stile edges ( coves, beads, round overs), and raised panel design just draw it in the door profile. If you rotate the door around you will notice there is no bottom on it, but most of the time if your doing a cabinet or kitchen model your only going to see the front anyways. Now go crank up your copy of Sketchup and make some doors!
I'm concerned software like sketchup will do to peoples sketching skills what the pocket calculator did to peoples math skills.
 

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Registered
Joined
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5,351 Posts
Making Cabinet Doors With The Follow Me Tool

Hello everyone! Since I discovered Sketchup several years ago (I have been Skecthing since release 3..pre Google) I have spent a great deal of time watching tutorials and prowling through the forums trying to learn as much about this great software as I can! Since I have been a member here I have seen some great blogs by other members about Sketchup and how to use it, so I thought I would throw my hat in the ring! I see allot of people saying I wish I could use Sketchup better, or I gotta learn Sketchup. I personally think it is one of the best tools you can use for designing woodworking and furniture projects. So I want to write this blog to try and get some of you interested in learning how to use this great tool, and to share some of the tricks and knowledge I have picked up along the way to make everyone love this software as much as I do! To me this is as important as any tool I have in my shop!

I found this little trick in the SU forum I wish I could remember who posted the original idea..I even went back and searched for it so I could give the guy credit, but I couldn't find the thread…so let me say that I DID NOT THINK OF THIS..although I wish I had 'cause it's pretty neat!. But anyways this is the coolest way to make cabinet doors I have seen yet. Oh sure, you could draw all your parts and put them together but that could be time consuming and not as much fun as this method! So here goes..I wish the pics could be larger, but we are limited to 640×480, but I think you can get the idea of what I am trying to do here. Lets start off with a simple flat panel door

First. draw a rectangle the dimensions being that of the cabinet door you would like to make. This door is 12"x30"
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Next, draw the profile of the door parts 2D as if cut in half. This door has 2" wide stiles and rails 1" thick, and a 1/4" flat panel center thats 8" wide. Don't bother with detailing the groves or joinery it wont be seen. But if you want any profiles or fancy edges on the rails and styles you would want to have that included.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, next select all the geometry associated with the door profile (an easy way to select all touching geometry is to triple click) then you want to rotate your door profile so its standing perfectly vertical. You do this with the rotate tool
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, now here comes the fun part..while all the geometry is still selected grab the bottom corner of the profile with the move tool and move it to the center of the left hand vertical line in your size rectangle.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Now, select the follow me tool, and click on the face of your door profile. Then, you start to move it around the door size outline following the edges. Sometimes the tool wigs out a little and you will get a weird looking result…don't worry just click undo and try again. It takes a little practice to get used to the follow me tool.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Finish by clicking back where you started and if you did it correctly, you should have something that looks like this…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then get out your trusty eraser, and erase the uneeded lines and you should have this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
I know some of you guys are saying "wheres the rail and stile ends"...I hear ya man..just get out the line tool and draw them in and presto..instant flat panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
You could copy that one door as many times as you needed and then use the scale tool to resize it for the other cabinets, but I find if your not careful with the scale tool it changes other dimensions that you dont want changed. I think it would be just as easy to use this method to create one of each door size then copy them as needded.

So now your saying "works ok for a plain flat panel but what about a raised panel" Well lets try one..
Same size rectangle as the one we used before…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The door profile is the same only I have a 2" bevel from the center of half the panel in to the frame
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Move that onto your size rectangle, snapping the lower corner to the center mark..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then, use the follow me tool just like the last door..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
If all the planets were in alignment (and your follow me tool was also) you should have a result that looks like this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Once again we turn to Mr. eraser, carefully remove the uneeded lines (not your bevels), and draw in you rail and stile ends and just like that, before the cat has a chance to choke up a hairball you have a raised panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Pretty neat huh? I thought it was when I read the original thread. You can get as fancy or as plain as you want with rail and stile edges ( coves, beads, round overs), and raised panel design just draw it in the door profile. If you rotate the door around you will notice there is no bottom on it, but most of the time if your doing a cabinet or kitchen model your only going to see the front anyways. Now go crank up your copy of Sketchup and make some doors!
Thanks for the tips, and in a friendly teaching environment. I have used a lot of other CAD tools and SU is a bit unique. I got to learn to think their way. Keep it coming.

Thanks again,
Steve
 

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Registered
Joined
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4,452 Posts
Making Cabinet Doors With The Follow Me Tool

Hello everyone! Since I discovered Sketchup several years ago (I have been Skecthing since release 3..pre Google) I have spent a great deal of time watching tutorials and prowling through the forums trying to learn as much about this great software as I can! Since I have been a member here I have seen some great blogs by other members about Sketchup and how to use it, so I thought I would throw my hat in the ring! I see allot of people saying I wish I could use Sketchup better, or I gotta learn Sketchup. I personally think it is one of the best tools you can use for designing woodworking and furniture projects. So I want to write this blog to try and get some of you interested in learning how to use this great tool, and to share some of the tricks and knowledge I have picked up along the way to make everyone love this software as much as I do! To me this is as important as any tool I have in my shop!

I found this little trick in the SU forum I wish I could remember who posted the original idea..I even went back and searched for it so I could give the guy credit, but I couldn't find the thread…so let me say that I DID NOT THINK OF THIS..although I wish I had 'cause it's pretty neat!. But anyways this is the coolest way to make cabinet doors I have seen yet. Oh sure, you could draw all your parts and put them together but that could be time consuming and not as much fun as this method! So here goes..I wish the pics could be larger, but we are limited to 640×480, but I think you can get the idea of what I am trying to do here. Lets start off with a simple flat panel door

First. draw a rectangle the dimensions being that of the cabinet door you would like to make. This door is 12"x30"
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Next, draw the profile of the door parts 2D as if cut in half. This door has 2" wide stiles and rails 1" thick, and a 1/4" flat panel center thats 8" wide. Don't bother with detailing the groves or joinery it wont be seen. But if you want any profiles or fancy edges on the rails and styles you would want to have that included.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, next select all the geometry associated with the door profile (an easy way to select all touching geometry is to triple click) then you want to rotate your door profile so its standing perfectly vertical. You do this with the rotate tool
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, now here comes the fun part..while all the geometry is still selected grab the bottom corner of the profile with the move tool and move it to the center of the left hand vertical line in your size rectangle.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Now, select the follow me tool, and click on the face of your door profile. Then, you start to move it around the door size outline following the edges. Sometimes the tool wigs out a little and you will get a weird looking result…don't worry just click undo and try again. It takes a little practice to get used to the follow me tool.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Finish by clicking back where you started and if you did it correctly, you should have something that looks like this…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then get out your trusty eraser, and erase the uneeded lines and you should have this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
I know some of you guys are saying "wheres the rail and stile ends"...I hear ya man..just get out the line tool and draw them in and presto..instant flat panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
You could copy that one door as many times as you needed and then use the scale tool to resize it for the other cabinets, but I find if your not careful with the scale tool it changes other dimensions that you dont want changed. I think it would be just as easy to use this method to create one of each door size then copy them as needded.

So now your saying "works ok for a plain flat panel but what about a raised panel" Well lets try one..
Same size rectangle as the one we used before…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The door profile is the same only I have a 2" bevel from the center of half the panel in to the frame
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Move that onto your size rectangle, snapping the lower corner to the center mark..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then, use the follow me tool just like the last door..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
If all the planets were in alignment (and your follow me tool was also) you should have a result that looks like this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Once again we turn to Mr. eraser, carefully remove the uneeded lines (not your bevels), and draw in you rail and stile ends and just like that, before the cat has a chance to choke up a hairball you have a raised panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Pretty neat huh? I thought it was when I read the original thread. You can get as fancy or as plain as you want with rail and stile edges ( coves, beads, round overs), and raised panel design just draw it in the door profile. If you rotate the door around you will notice there is no bottom on it, but most of the time if your doing a cabinet or kitchen model your only going to see the front anyways. Now go crank up your copy of Sketchup and make some doors!
This some great stuff. At present i am using it to do 2D drawings and saving myself some time. I keep using it and adding to my knowledge but not fast enough. David, why don't yhou staqrt a once per week tutorial blog with Bob Babcock and get the rest of us up to speed. Many of us would appreciate it.
 

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Making Cabinet Doors With The Follow Me Tool

Hello everyone! Since I discovered Sketchup several years ago (I have been Skecthing since release 3..pre Google) I have spent a great deal of time watching tutorials and prowling through the forums trying to learn as much about this great software as I can! Since I have been a member here I have seen some great blogs by other members about Sketchup and how to use it, so I thought I would throw my hat in the ring! I see allot of people saying I wish I could use Sketchup better, or I gotta learn Sketchup. I personally think it is one of the best tools you can use for designing woodworking and furniture projects. So I want to write this blog to try and get some of you interested in learning how to use this great tool, and to share some of the tricks and knowledge I have picked up along the way to make everyone love this software as much as I do! To me this is as important as any tool I have in my shop!

I found this little trick in the SU forum I wish I could remember who posted the original idea..I even went back and searched for it so I could give the guy credit, but I couldn't find the thread…so let me say that I DID NOT THINK OF THIS..although I wish I had 'cause it's pretty neat!. But anyways this is the coolest way to make cabinet doors I have seen yet. Oh sure, you could draw all your parts and put them together but that could be time consuming and not as much fun as this method! So here goes..I wish the pics could be larger, but we are limited to 640×480, but I think you can get the idea of what I am trying to do here. Lets start off with a simple flat panel door

First. draw a rectangle the dimensions being that of the cabinet door you would like to make. This door is 12"x30"
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Next, draw the profile of the door parts 2D as if cut in half. This door has 2" wide stiles and rails 1" thick, and a 1/4" flat panel center thats 8" wide. Don't bother with detailing the groves or joinery it wont be seen. But if you want any profiles or fancy edges on the rails and styles you would want to have that included.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, next select all the geometry associated with the door profile (an easy way to select all touching geometry is to triple click) then you want to rotate your door profile so its standing perfectly vertical. You do this with the rotate tool
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, now here comes the fun part..while all the geometry is still selected grab the bottom corner of the profile with the move tool and move it to the center of the left hand vertical line in your size rectangle.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Now, select the follow me tool, and click on the face of your door profile. Then, you start to move it around the door size outline following the edges. Sometimes the tool wigs out a little and you will get a weird looking result…don't worry just click undo and try again. It takes a little practice to get used to the follow me tool.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Finish by clicking back where you started and if you did it correctly, you should have something that looks like this…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then get out your trusty eraser, and erase the uneeded lines and you should have this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
I know some of you guys are saying "wheres the rail and stile ends"...I hear ya man..just get out the line tool and draw them in and presto..instant flat panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
You could copy that one door as many times as you needed and then use the scale tool to resize it for the other cabinets, but I find if your not careful with the scale tool it changes other dimensions that you dont want changed. I think it would be just as easy to use this method to create one of each door size then copy them as needded.

So now your saying "works ok for a plain flat panel but what about a raised panel" Well lets try one..
Same size rectangle as the one we used before…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The door profile is the same only I have a 2" bevel from the center of half the panel in to the frame
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Move that onto your size rectangle, snapping the lower corner to the center mark..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then, use the follow me tool just like the last door..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
If all the planets were in alignment (and your follow me tool was also) you should have a result that looks like this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Once again we turn to Mr. eraser, carefully remove the uneeded lines (not your bevels), and draw in you rail and stile ends and just like that, before the cat has a chance to choke up a hairball you have a raised panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Pretty neat huh? I thought it was when I read the original thread. You can get as fancy or as plain as you want with rail and stile edges ( coves, beads, round overs), and raised panel design just draw it in the door profile. If you rotate the door around you will notice there is no bottom on it, but most of the time if your doing a cabinet or kitchen model your only going to see the front anyways. Now go crank up your copy of Sketchup and make some doors!
Miles, you haven't seen my sketching skills before SketchUp! Personally, I'm more concerned about what TV has done to people's reading and writing and creative thinking skills.

To get a different width of the same profile door, copy the original, then select one stile, the adjacent rail ends, and the nearest edge of the panel profile and move them to the new width. The rest of the door will stretch to match. To resize height, follow the same steps, but select a rail instead of a stile.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Making Cabinet Doors With The Follow Me Tool

Hello everyone! Since I discovered Sketchup several years ago (I have been Skecthing since release 3..pre Google) I have spent a great deal of time watching tutorials and prowling through the forums trying to learn as much about this great software as I can! Since I have been a member here I have seen some great blogs by other members about Sketchup and how to use it, so I thought I would throw my hat in the ring! I see allot of people saying I wish I could use Sketchup better, or I gotta learn Sketchup. I personally think it is one of the best tools you can use for designing woodworking and furniture projects. So I want to write this blog to try and get some of you interested in learning how to use this great tool, and to share some of the tricks and knowledge I have picked up along the way to make everyone love this software as much as I do! To me this is as important as any tool I have in my shop!

I found this little trick in the SU forum I wish I could remember who posted the original idea..I even went back and searched for it so I could give the guy credit, but I couldn't find the thread…so let me say that I DID NOT THINK OF THIS..although I wish I had 'cause it's pretty neat!. But anyways this is the coolest way to make cabinet doors I have seen yet. Oh sure, you could draw all your parts and put them together but that could be time consuming and not as much fun as this method! So here goes..I wish the pics could be larger, but we are limited to 640×480, but I think you can get the idea of what I am trying to do here. Lets start off with a simple flat panel door

First. draw a rectangle the dimensions being that of the cabinet door you would like to make. This door is 12"x30"
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Next, draw the profile of the door parts 2D as if cut in half. This door has 2" wide stiles and rails 1" thick, and a 1/4" flat panel center thats 8" wide. Don't bother with detailing the groves or joinery it wont be seen. But if you want any profiles or fancy edges on the rails and styles you would want to have that included.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, next select all the geometry associated with the door profile (an easy way to select all touching geometry is to triple click) then you want to rotate your door profile so its standing perfectly vertical. You do this with the rotate tool
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, now here comes the fun part..while all the geometry is still selected grab the bottom corner of the profile with the move tool and move it to the center of the left hand vertical line in your size rectangle.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Now, select the follow me tool, and click on the face of your door profile. Then, you start to move it around the door size outline following the edges. Sometimes the tool wigs out a little and you will get a weird looking result…don't worry just click undo and try again. It takes a little practice to get used to the follow me tool.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Finish by clicking back where you started and if you did it correctly, you should have something that looks like this…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then get out your trusty eraser, and erase the uneeded lines and you should have this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
I know some of you guys are saying "wheres the rail and stile ends"...I hear ya man..just get out the line tool and draw them in and presto..instant flat panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
You could copy that one door as many times as you needed and then use the scale tool to resize it for the other cabinets, but I find if your not careful with the scale tool it changes other dimensions that you dont want changed. I think it would be just as easy to use this method to create one of each door size then copy them as needded.

So now your saying "works ok for a plain flat panel but what about a raised panel" Well lets try one..
Same size rectangle as the one we used before…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The door profile is the same only I have a 2" bevel from the center of half the panel in to the frame
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Move that onto your size rectangle, snapping the lower corner to the center mark..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then, use the follow me tool just like the last door..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
If all the planets were in alignment (and your follow me tool was also) you should have a result that looks like this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Once again we turn to Mr. eraser, carefully remove the uneeded lines (not your bevels), and draw in you rail and stile ends and just like that, before the cat has a chance to choke up a hairball you have a raised panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Pretty neat huh? I thought it was when I read the original thread. You can get as fancy or as plain as you want with rail and stile edges ( coves, beads, round overs), and raised panel design just draw it in the door profile. If you rotate the door around you will notice there is no bottom on it, but most of the time if your doing a cabinet or kitchen model your only going to see the front anyways. Now go crank up your copy of Sketchup and make some doors!
Thanks for all the comments guys!
@Miles..I can't sketch at all…thats what prompted me to get into drafting in the first place…god bless the T-square!
@Peter..Thanks for chiming in with that tip… thats a much better way to re size the doors than using the scale tool.
 

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Making Cabinet Doors With The Follow Me Tool

Hello everyone! Since I discovered Sketchup several years ago (I have been Skecthing since release 3..pre Google) I have spent a great deal of time watching tutorials and prowling through the forums trying to learn as much about this great software as I can! Since I have been a member here I have seen some great blogs by other members about Sketchup and how to use it, so I thought I would throw my hat in the ring! I see allot of people saying I wish I could use Sketchup better, or I gotta learn Sketchup. I personally think it is one of the best tools you can use for designing woodworking and furniture projects. So I want to write this blog to try and get some of you interested in learning how to use this great tool, and to share some of the tricks and knowledge I have picked up along the way to make everyone love this software as much as I do! To me this is as important as any tool I have in my shop!

I found this little trick in the SU forum I wish I could remember who posted the original idea..I even went back and searched for it so I could give the guy credit, but I couldn't find the thread…so let me say that I DID NOT THINK OF THIS..although I wish I had 'cause it's pretty neat!. But anyways this is the coolest way to make cabinet doors I have seen yet. Oh sure, you could draw all your parts and put them together but that could be time consuming and not as much fun as this method! So here goes..I wish the pics could be larger, but we are limited to 640×480, but I think you can get the idea of what I am trying to do here. Lets start off with a simple flat panel door

First. draw a rectangle the dimensions being that of the cabinet door you would like to make. This door is 12"x30"
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Next, draw the profile of the door parts 2D as if cut in half. This door has 2" wide stiles and rails 1" thick, and a 1/4" flat panel center thats 8" wide. Don't bother with detailing the groves or joinery it wont be seen. But if you want any profiles or fancy edges on the rails and styles you would want to have that included.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, next select all the geometry associated with the door profile (an easy way to select all touching geometry is to triple click) then you want to rotate your door profile so its standing perfectly vertical. You do this with the rotate tool
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, now here comes the fun part..while all the geometry is still selected grab the bottom corner of the profile with the move tool and move it to the center of the left hand vertical line in your size rectangle.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Now, select the follow me tool, and click on the face of your door profile. Then, you start to move it around the door size outline following the edges. Sometimes the tool wigs out a little and you will get a weird looking result…don't worry just click undo and try again. It takes a little practice to get used to the follow me tool.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Finish by clicking back where you started and if you did it correctly, you should have something that looks like this…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then get out your trusty eraser, and erase the uneeded lines and you should have this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
I know some of you guys are saying "wheres the rail and stile ends"...I hear ya man..just get out the line tool and draw them in and presto..instant flat panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
You could copy that one door as many times as you needed and then use the scale tool to resize it for the other cabinets, but I find if your not careful with the scale tool it changes other dimensions that you dont want changed. I think it would be just as easy to use this method to create one of each door size then copy them as needded.

So now your saying "works ok for a plain flat panel but what about a raised panel" Well lets try one..
Same size rectangle as the one we used before…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The door profile is the same only I have a 2" bevel from the center of half the panel in to the frame
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Move that onto your size rectangle, snapping the lower corner to the center mark..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then, use the follow me tool just like the last door..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
If all the planets were in alignment (and your follow me tool was also) you should have a result that looks like this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Once again we turn to Mr. eraser, carefully remove the uneeded lines (not your bevels), and draw in you rail and stile ends and just like that, before the cat has a chance to choke up a hairball you have a raised panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Pretty neat huh? I thought it was when I read the original thread. You can get as fancy or as plain as you want with rail and stile edges ( coves, beads, round overs), and raised panel design just draw it in the door profile. If you rotate the door around you will notice there is no bottom on it, but most of the time if your doing a cabinet or kitchen model your only going to see the front anyways. Now go crank up your copy of Sketchup and make some doors!
I better go up to Emmitt for a day or two.
 

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Registered
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1,449 Posts
Making Cabinet Doors With The Follow Me Tool

Hello everyone! Since I discovered Sketchup several years ago (I have been Skecthing since release 3..pre Google) I have spent a great deal of time watching tutorials and prowling through the forums trying to learn as much about this great software as I can! Since I have been a member here I have seen some great blogs by other members about Sketchup and how to use it, so I thought I would throw my hat in the ring! I see allot of people saying I wish I could use Sketchup better, or I gotta learn Sketchup. I personally think it is one of the best tools you can use for designing woodworking and furniture projects. So I want to write this blog to try and get some of you interested in learning how to use this great tool, and to share some of the tricks and knowledge I have picked up along the way to make everyone love this software as much as I do! To me this is as important as any tool I have in my shop!

I found this little trick in the SU forum I wish I could remember who posted the original idea..I even went back and searched for it so I could give the guy credit, but I couldn't find the thread…so let me say that I DID NOT THINK OF THIS..although I wish I had 'cause it's pretty neat!. But anyways this is the coolest way to make cabinet doors I have seen yet. Oh sure, you could draw all your parts and put them together but that could be time consuming and not as much fun as this method! So here goes..I wish the pics could be larger, but we are limited to 640×480, but I think you can get the idea of what I am trying to do here. Lets start off with a simple flat panel door

First. draw a rectangle the dimensions being that of the cabinet door you would like to make. This door is 12"x30"
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Next, draw the profile of the door parts 2D as if cut in half. This door has 2" wide stiles and rails 1" thick, and a 1/4" flat panel center thats 8" wide. Don't bother with detailing the groves or joinery it wont be seen. But if you want any profiles or fancy edges on the rails and styles you would want to have that included.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, next select all the geometry associated with the door profile (an easy way to select all touching geometry is to triple click) then you want to rotate your door profile so its standing perfectly vertical. You do this with the rotate tool
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, now here comes the fun part..while all the geometry is still selected grab the bottom corner of the profile with the move tool and move it to the center of the left hand vertical line in your size rectangle.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Now, select the follow me tool, and click on the face of your door profile. Then, you start to move it around the door size outline following the edges. Sometimes the tool wigs out a little and you will get a weird looking result…don't worry just click undo and try again. It takes a little practice to get used to the follow me tool.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Finish by clicking back where you started and if you did it correctly, you should have something that looks like this…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then get out your trusty eraser, and erase the uneeded lines and you should have this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
I know some of you guys are saying "wheres the rail and stile ends"...I hear ya man..just get out the line tool and draw them in and presto..instant flat panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
You could copy that one door as many times as you needed and then use the scale tool to resize it for the other cabinets, but I find if your not careful with the scale tool it changes other dimensions that you dont want changed. I think it would be just as easy to use this method to create one of each door size then copy them as needded.

So now your saying "works ok for a plain flat panel but what about a raised panel" Well lets try one..
Same size rectangle as the one we used before…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The door profile is the same only I have a 2" bevel from the center of half the panel in to the frame
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Move that onto your size rectangle, snapping the lower corner to the center mark..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then, use the follow me tool just like the last door..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
If all the planets were in alignment (and your follow me tool was also) you should have a result that looks like this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Once again we turn to Mr. eraser, carefully remove the uneeded lines (not your bevels), and draw in you rail and stile ends and just like that, before the cat has a chance to choke up a hairball you have a raised panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Pretty neat huh? I thought it was when I read the original thread. You can get as fancy or as plain as you want with rail and stile edges ( coves, beads, round overs), and raised panel design just draw it in the door profile. If you rotate the door around you will notice there is no bottom on it, but most of the time if your doing a cabinet or kitchen model your only going to see the front anyways. Now go crank up your copy of Sketchup and make some doors!
Ha! Sure, Tom - I'll send you my rate card for software training!
 

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Registered
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58 Posts
Making Cabinet Doors With The Follow Me Tool

Hello everyone! Since I discovered Sketchup several years ago (I have been Skecthing since release 3..pre Google) I have spent a great deal of time watching tutorials and prowling through the forums trying to learn as much about this great software as I can! Since I have been a member here I have seen some great blogs by other members about Sketchup and how to use it, so I thought I would throw my hat in the ring! I see allot of people saying I wish I could use Sketchup better, or I gotta learn Sketchup. I personally think it is one of the best tools you can use for designing woodworking and furniture projects. So I want to write this blog to try and get some of you interested in learning how to use this great tool, and to share some of the tricks and knowledge I have picked up along the way to make everyone love this software as much as I do! To me this is as important as any tool I have in my shop!

I found this little trick in the SU forum I wish I could remember who posted the original idea..I even went back and searched for it so I could give the guy credit, but I couldn't find the thread…so let me say that I DID NOT THINK OF THIS..although I wish I had 'cause it's pretty neat!. But anyways this is the coolest way to make cabinet doors I have seen yet. Oh sure, you could draw all your parts and put them together but that could be time consuming and not as much fun as this method! So here goes..I wish the pics could be larger, but we are limited to 640×480, but I think you can get the idea of what I am trying to do here. Lets start off with a simple flat panel door

First. draw a rectangle the dimensions being that of the cabinet door you would like to make. This door is 12"x30"
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Next, draw the profile of the door parts 2D as if cut in half. This door has 2" wide stiles and rails 1" thick, and a 1/4" flat panel center thats 8" wide. Don't bother with detailing the groves or joinery it wont be seen. But if you want any profiles or fancy edges on the rails and styles you would want to have that included.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, next select all the geometry associated with the door profile (an easy way to select all touching geometry is to triple click) then you want to rotate your door profile so its standing perfectly vertical. You do this with the rotate tool
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, now here comes the fun part..while all the geometry is still selected grab the bottom corner of the profile with the move tool and move it to the center of the left hand vertical line in your size rectangle.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Now, select the follow me tool, and click on the face of your door profile. Then, you start to move it around the door size outline following the edges. Sometimes the tool wigs out a little and you will get a weird looking result…don't worry just click undo and try again. It takes a little practice to get used to the follow me tool.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Finish by clicking back where you started and if you did it correctly, you should have something that looks like this…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then get out your trusty eraser, and erase the uneeded lines and you should have this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
I know some of you guys are saying "wheres the rail and stile ends"...I hear ya man..just get out the line tool and draw them in and presto..instant flat panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
You could copy that one door as many times as you needed and then use the scale tool to resize it for the other cabinets, but I find if your not careful with the scale tool it changes other dimensions that you dont want changed. I think it would be just as easy to use this method to create one of each door size then copy them as needded.

So now your saying "works ok for a plain flat panel but what about a raised panel" Well lets try one..
Same size rectangle as the one we used before…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The door profile is the same only I have a 2" bevel from the center of half the panel in to the frame
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Move that onto your size rectangle, snapping the lower corner to the center mark..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then, use the follow me tool just like the last door..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
If all the planets were in alignment (and your follow me tool was also) you should have a result that looks like this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Once again we turn to Mr. eraser, carefully remove the uneeded lines (not your bevels), and draw in you rail and stile ends and just like that, before the cat has a chance to choke up a hairball you have a raised panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Pretty neat huh? I thought it was when I read the original thread. You can get as fancy or as plain as you want with rail and stile edges ( coves, beads, round overs), and raised panel design just draw it in the door profile. If you rotate the door around you will notice there is no bottom on it, but most of the time if your doing a cabinet or kitchen model your only going to see the front anyways. Now go crank up your copy of Sketchup and make some doors!
This may be stale but I learned that if you preselect the border you want follow me to follow it will automatically fill out the shape without having to manually follow the lines.
 

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Registered
Joined
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709 Posts
Making Cabinet Doors With The Follow Me Tool

Hello everyone! Since I discovered Sketchup several years ago (I have been Skecthing since release 3..pre Google) I have spent a great deal of time watching tutorials and prowling through the forums trying to learn as much about this great software as I can! Since I have been a member here I have seen some great blogs by other members about Sketchup and how to use it, so I thought I would throw my hat in the ring! I see allot of people saying I wish I could use Sketchup better, or I gotta learn Sketchup. I personally think it is one of the best tools you can use for designing woodworking and furniture projects. So I want to write this blog to try and get some of you interested in learning how to use this great tool, and to share some of the tricks and knowledge I have picked up along the way to make everyone love this software as much as I do! To me this is as important as any tool I have in my shop!

I found this little trick in the SU forum I wish I could remember who posted the original idea..I even went back and searched for it so I could give the guy credit, but I couldn't find the thread…so let me say that I DID NOT THINK OF THIS..although I wish I had 'cause it's pretty neat!. But anyways this is the coolest way to make cabinet doors I have seen yet. Oh sure, you could draw all your parts and put them together but that could be time consuming and not as much fun as this method! So here goes..I wish the pics could be larger, but we are limited to 640×480, but I think you can get the idea of what I am trying to do here. Lets start off with a simple flat panel door

First. draw a rectangle the dimensions being that of the cabinet door you would like to make. This door is 12"x30"
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Next, draw the profile of the door parts 2D as if cut in half. This door has 2" wide stiles and rails 1" thick, and a 1/4" flat panel center thats 8" wide. Don't bother with detailing the groves or joinery it wont be seen. But if you want any profiles or fancy edges on the rails and styles you would want to have that included.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, next select all the geometry associated with the door profile (an easy way to select all touching geometry is to triple click) then you want to rotate your door profile so its standing perfectly vertical. You do this with the rotate tool
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, now here comes the fun part..while all the geometry is still selected grab the bottom corner of the profile with the move tool and move it to the center of the left hand vertical line in your size rectangle.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Now, select the follow me tool, and click on the face of your door profile. Then, you start to move it around the door size outline following the edges. Sometimes the tool wigs out a little and you will get a weird looking result…don't worry just click undo and try again. It takes a little practice to get used to the follow me tool.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Finish by clicking back where you started and if you did it correctly, you should have something that looks like this…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then get out your trusty eraser, and erase the uneeded lines and you should have this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
I know some of you guys are saying "wheres the rail and stile ends"...I hear ya man..just get out the line tool and draw them in and presto..instant flat panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
You could copy that one door as many times as you needed and then use the scale tool to resize it for the other cabinets, but I find if your not careful with the scale tool it changes other dimensions that you dont want changed. I think it would be just as easy to use this method to create one of each door size then copy them as needded.

So now your saying "works ok for a plain flat panel but what about a raised panel" Well lets try one..
Same size rectangle as the one we used before…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The door profile is the same only I have a 2" bevel from the center of half the panel in to the frame
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Move that onto your size rectangle, snapping the lower corner to the center mark..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then, use the follow me tool just like the last door..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
If all the planets were in alignment (and your follow me tool was also) you should have a result that looks like this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Once again we turn to Mr. eraser, carefully remove the uneeded lines (not your bevels), and draw in you rail and stile ends and just like that, before the cat has a chance to choke up a hairball you have a raised panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Pretty neat huh? I thought it was when I read the original thread. You can get as fancy or as plain as you want with rail and stile edges ( coves, beads, round overs), and raised panel design just draw it in the door profile. If you rotate the door around you will notice there is no bottom on it, but most of the time if your doing a cabinet or kitchen model your only going to see the front anyways. Now go crank up your copy of Sketchup and make some doors!
Next, draw the profile of the door parts 2D as if cut in half. This door has 2" wide stiles and rails 1" thick, and a 1/4" flat panel center thats 8" wide. Don't bother with detailing the groves or joinery it wont be seen. But if you want any profiles or fancy edges on the rails and styles you would want to have that included.

That's the part I really don't understand. I tried drawing it with lines and rectangles and it still don't work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Making Cabinet Doors With The Follow Me Tool

Hello everyone! Since I discovered Sketchup several years ago (I have been Skecthing since release 3..pre Google) I have spent a great deal of time watching tutorials and prowling through the forums trying to learn as much about this great software as I can! Since I have been a member here I have seen some great blogs by other members about Sketchup and how to use it, so I thought I would throw my hat in the ring! I see allot of people saying I wish I could use Sketchup better, or I gotta learn Sketchup. I personally think it is one of the best tools you can use for designing woodworking and furniture projects. So I want to write this blog to try and get some of you interested in learning how to use this great tool, and to share some of the tricks and knowledge I have picked up along the way to make everyone love this software as much as I do! To me this is as important as any tool I have in my shop!

I found this little trick in the SU forum I wish I could remember who posted the original idea..I even went back and searched for it so I could give the guy credit, but I couldn't find the thread…so let me say that I DID NOT THINK OF THIS..although I wish I had 'cause it's pretty neat!. But anyways this is the coolest way to make cabinet doors I have seen yet. Oh sure, you could draw all your parts and put them together but that could be time consuming and not as much fun as this method! So here goes..I wish the pics could be larger, but we are limited to 640×480, but I think you can get the idea of what I am trying to do here. Lets start off with a simple flat panel door

First. draw a rectangle the dimensions being that of the cabinet door you would like to make. This door is 12"x30"
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Next, draw the profile of the door parts 2D as if cut in half. This door has 2" wide stiles and rails 1" thick, and a 1/4" flat panel center thats 8" wide. Don't bother with detailing the groves or joinery it wont be seen. But if you want any profiles or fancy edges on the rails and styles you would want to have that included.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, next select all the geometry associated with the door profile (an easy way to select all touching geometry is to triple click) then you want to rotate your door profile so its standing perfectly vertical. You do this with the rotate tool
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Ok, now here comes the fun part..while all the geometry is still selected grab the bottom corner of the profile with the move tool and move it to the center of the left hand vertical line in your size rectangle.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Now, select the follow me tool, and click on the face of your door profile. Then, you start to move it around the door size outline following the edges. Sometimes the tool wigs out a little and you will get a weird looking result…don't worry just click undo and try again. It takes a little practice to get used to the follow me tool.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Finish by clicking back where you started and if you did it correctly, you should have something that looks like this…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then get out your trusty eraser, and erase the uneeded lines and you should have this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
I know some of you guys are saying "wheres the rail and stile ends"...I hear ya man..just get out the line tool and draw them in and presto..instant flat panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
You could copy that one door as many times as you needed and then use the scale tool to resize it for the other cabinets, but I find if your not careful with the scale tool it changes other dimensions that you dont want changed. I think it would be just as easy to use this method to create one of each door size then copy them as needded.

So now your saying "works ok for a plain flat panel but what about a raised panel" Well lets try one..
Same size rectangle as the one we used before…
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
The door profile is the same only I have a 2" bevel from the center of half the panel in to the frame
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Move that onto your size rectangle, snapping the lower corner to the center mark..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Then, use the follow me tool just like the last door..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
If all the planets were in alignment (and your follow me tool was also) you should have a result that looks like this..
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Once again we turn to Mr. eraser, carefully remove the uneeded lines (not your bevels), and draw in you rail and stile ends and just like that, before the cat has a chance to choke up a hairball you have a raised panel cabinet door!
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Pretty neat huh? I thought it was when I read the original thread. You can get as fancy or as plain as you want with rail and stile edges ( coves, beads, round overs), and raised panel design just draw it in the door profile. If you rotate the door around you will notice there is no bottom on it, but most of the time if your doing a cabinet or kitchen model your only going to see the front anyways. Now go crank up your copy of Sketchup and make some doors!
Thelt..
You want to draw a profile of the door as if you sliced it in half and was looking squarely at the section. Draw it flat on the ground in the red/green axis and then when you get it worked out the way you want it then rotate it (stand it up) and place it on your guidelines for the door dimensions as I indicated in the drawing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The Virtual Woodshop

Hey everybody! I was just reading and responding to someones forum topic about shop design, and I remembered that a while ago I downloaded a Sketchup component library that contained models of most of the power equipment you would find in a wood shop. I got it from the downloads/components page of the old Sketchup (pre Google). I don't remember who did the modeling but they graciously put it up there for anyone to download and use. Here is a couple of screen shots of the stuff thats in it….

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Each item is a component group. They are a little low poly, but the detail is pretty good on most of the items. You could easily use any of the models as a starting point to super detail an individual piece of equipment.. The great thing is you could just create a basic room representing your shop and then just drag and drop whatever pieces you have, then move them around, re arrange to your hearts content. You could make a couple of cubes and position them to represent the in-feed/out-feed clearances of certain machines..just paint them with an transparent material like colored glass. Then as you move things around you could instantly see if you are going to have the room for a good work flow. If you wanted to be super precise, you could take rough measurements of your equipment, then re scale the model to be the perfect size. The possibility's are endless!

So I went to the Sketchup downloads/components page to copy the link to the file to post for everyone, but they don't have it up there anymore! Bummer! I was going to just ask people to email me if they wanted a copy of the file, but I had a feeling that allot of people might want the file. So I put it up on my personal web space here is the link http://members.cox.net/fella/Woodworking%20Tools.skp The first time you open it with SU ver 6 you will get a message about it being in and older file format..don't worry just save it when your done playing, and you shouldn't see it again.

Well everyone download the file and start working on your shop layouts! This is a good way to play around with Sketchup without having to do allot of modeling first. Post some screen shots of your virtual shops!
 

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The Virtual Woodshop

Hey everybody! I was just reading and responding to someones forum topic about shop design, and I remembered that a while ago I downloaded a Sketchup component library that contained models of most of the power equipment you would find in a wood shop. I got it from the downloads/components page of the old Sketchup (pre Google). I don't remember who did the modeling but they graciously put it up there for anyone to download and use. Here is a couple of screen shots of the stuff thats in it….

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Each item is a component group. They are a little low poly, but the detail is pretty good on most of the items. You could easily use any of the models as a starting point to super detail an individual piece of equipment.. The great thing is you could just create a basic room representing your shop and then just drag and drop whatever pieces you have, then move them around, re arrange to your hearts content. You could make a couple of cubes and position them to represent the in-feed/out-feed clearances of certain machines..just paint them with an transparent material like colored glass. Then as you move things around you could instantly see if you are going to have the room for a good work flow. If you wanted to be super precise, you could take rough measurements of your equipment, then re scale the model to be the perfect size. The possibility's are endless!

So I went to the Sketchup downloads/components page to copy the link to the file to post for everyone, but they don't have it up there anymore! Bummer! I was going to just ask people to email me if they wanted a copy of the file, but I had a feeling that allot of people might want the file. So I put it up on my personal web space here is the link http://members.cox.net/fella/Woodworking%20Tools.skp The first time you open it with SU ver 6 you will get a message about it being in and older file format..don't worry just save it when your done playing, and you shouldn't see it again.

Well everyone download the file and start working on your shop layouts! This is a good way to play around with Sketchup without having to do allot of modeling first. Post some screen shots of your virtual shops!
Thanks Brad. I just went to the site, but it only gave me the top set of tools (the one with the workbench). Are the bottom set of tools somewhere else? I do appreciate the effort - great tool, as I am getting ready to rearrange my shop in the next week or two.
 

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The Virtual Woodshop

Hey everybody! I was just reading and responding to someones forum topic about shop design, and I remembered that a while ago I downloaded a Sketchup component library that contained models of most of the power equipment you would find in a wood shop. I got it from the downloads/components page of the old Sketchup (pre Google). I don't remember who did the modeling but they graciously put it up there for anyone to download and use. Here is a couple of screen shots of the stuff thats in it….

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Each item is a component group. They are a little low poly, but the detail is pretty good on most of the items. You could easily use any of the models as a starting point to super detail an individual piece of equipment.. The great thing is you could just create a basic room representing your shop and then just drag and drop whatever pieces you have, then move them around, re arrange to your hearts content. You could make a couple of cubes and position them to represent the in-feed/out-feed clearances of certain machines..just paint them with an transparent material like colored glass. Then as you move things around you could instantly see if you are going to have the room for a good work flow. If you wanted to be super precise, you could take rough measurements of your equipment, then re scale the model to be the perfect size. The possibility's are endless!

So I went to the Sketchup downloads/components page to copy the link to the file to post for everyone, but they don't have it up there anymore! Bummer! I was going to just ask people to email me if they wanted a copy of the file, but I had a feeling that allot of people might want the file. So I put it up on my personal web space here is the link http://members.cox.net/fella/Woodworking%20Tools.skp The first time you open it with SU ver 6 you will get a message about it being in and older file format..don't worry just save it when your done playing, and you shouldn't see it again.

Well everyone download the file and start working on your shop layouts! This is a good way to play around with Sketchup without having to do allot of modeling first. Post some screen shots of your virtual shops!
Thanks Brad, that will be very helpful as I get my shop re-organized! Right now it's a disaster area as I am finishing the basement and my shop has become the temporary storage area for all of the basement contents.

Bill, when you open the file in sketchup, click on Window in the menu, then select Components from the drop down box and you will see that there are about 30 different tool components available in this model. If you left click on the little icon beside the "In Model" box, you will get another menu which allows you to "Save library as". Click on this menu item and browse to the Google Sketchup 6 program directory, and save it to the Components sub directory, and this component library of tools will be available to you in all future models.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The Virtual Woodshop

Hey everybody! I was just reading and responding to someones forum topic about shop design, and I remembered that a while ago I downloaded a Sketchup component library that contained models of most of the power equipment you would find in a wood shop. I got it from the downloads/components page of the old Sketchup (pre Google). I don't remember who did the modeling but they graciously put it up there for anyone to download and use. Here is a couple of screen shots of the stuff thats in it….

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Each item is a component group. They are a little low poly, but the detail is pretty good on most of the items. You could easily use any of the models as a starting point to super detail an individual piece of equipment.. The great thing is you could just create a basic room representing your shop and then just drag and drop whatever pieces you have, then move them around, re arrange to your hearts content. You could make a couple of cubes and position them to represent the in-feed/out-feed clearances of certain machines..just paint them with an transparent material like colored glass. Then as you move things around you could instantly see if you are going to have the room for a good work flow. If you wanted to be super precise, you could take rough measurements of your equipment, then re scale the model to be the perfect size. The possibility's are endless!

So I went to the Sketchup downloads/components page to copy the link to the file to post for everyone, but they don't have it up there anymore! Bummer! I was going to just ask people to email me if they wanted a copy of the file, but I had a feeling that allot of people might want the file. So I put it up on my personal web space here is the link http://members.cox.net/fella/Woodworking%20Tools.skp The first time you open it with SU ver 6 you will get a message about it being in and older file format..don't worry just save it when your done playing, and you shouldn't see it again.

Well everyone download the file and start working on your shop layouts! This is a good way to play around with Sketchup without having to do allot of modeling first. Post some screen shots of your virtual shops!
Bill…. That is the same bunch of tools..i just took a screen shot from the opposite side so people could see from both angles. Mathew is correct….that is how you save all the components into your component browser so the models will be available to you in any future drawings without having to drag and drop them from two windows.

Just click on the link above and save it to your computer!
 

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The Virtual Woodshop

Hey everybody! I was just reading and responding to someones forum topic about shop design, and I remembered that a while ago I downloaded a Sketchup component library that contained models of most of the power equipment you would find in a wood shop. I got it from the downloads/components page of the old Sketchup (pre Google). I don't remember who did the modeling but they graciously put it up there for anyone to download and use. Here is a couple of screen shots of the stuff thats in it….

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Each item is a component group. They are a little low poly, but the detail is pretty good on most of the items. You could easily use any of the models as a starting point to super detail an individual piece of equipment.. The great thing is you could just create a basic room representing your shop and then just drag and drop whatever pieces you have, then move them around, re arrange to your hearts content. You could make a couple of cubes and position them to represent the in-feed/out-feed clearances of certain machines..just paint them with an transparent material like colored glass. Then as you move things around you could instantly see if you are going to have the room for a good work flow. If you wanted to be super precise, you could take rough measurements of your equipment, then re scale the model to be the perfect size. The possibility's are endless!

So I went to the Sketchup downloads/components page to copy the link to the file to post for everyone, but they don't have it up there anymore! Bummer! I was going to just ask people to email me if they wanted a copy of the file, but I had a feeling that allot of people might want the file. So I put it up on my personal web space here is the link http://members.cox.net/fella/Woodworking%20Tools.skp The first time you open it with SU ver 6 you will get a message about it being in and older file format..don't worry just save it when your done playing, and you shouldn't see it again.

Well everyone download the file and start working on your shop layouts! This is a good way to play around with Sketchup without having to do allot of modeling first. Post some screen shots of your virtual shops!
thanks for posting that david . i havent had time to work with su enough to get the hang of it yet but i hope to have time to work with it some this month . thanks again
 

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The Virtual Woodshop

Hey everybody! I was just reading and responding to someones forum topic about shop design, and I remembered that a while ago I downloaded a Sketchup component library that contained models of most of the power equipment you would find in a wood shop. I got it from the downloads/components page of the old Sketchup (pre Google). I don't remember who did the modeling but they graciously put it up there for anyone to download and use. Here is a couple of screen shots of the stuff thats in it….

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Each item is a component group. They are a little low poly, but the detail is pretty good on most of the items. You could easily use any of the models as a starting point to super detail an individual piece of equipment.. The great thing is you could just create a basic room representing your shop and then just drag and drop whatever pieces you have, then move them around, re arrange to your hearts content. You could make a couple of cubes and position them to represent the in-feed/out-feed clearances of certain machines..just paint them with an transparent material like colored glass. Then as you move things around you could instantly see if you are going to have the room for a good work flow. If you wanted to be super precise, you could take rough measurements of your equipment, then re scale the model to be the perfect size. The possibility's are endless!

So I went to the Sketchup downloads/components page to copy the link to the file to post for everyone, but they don't have it up there anymore! Bummer! I was going to just ask people to email me if they wanted a copy of the file, but I had a feeling that allot of people might want the file. So I put it up on my personal web space here is the link http://members.cox.net/fella/Woodworking%20Tools.skp The first time you open it with SU ver 6 you will get a message about it being in and older file format..don't worry just save it when your done playing, and you shouldn't see it again.

Well everyone download the file and start working on your shop layouts! This is a good way to play around with Sketchup without having to do allot of modeling first. Post some screen shots of your virtual shops!
Excellent. I've been meaning to get to work on layout for my shop - desperately needed in anticipation of our impending house renovation which will include renovating the shop.
 

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The Virtual Woodshop

Hey everybody! I was just reading and responding to someones forum topic about shop design, and I remembered that a while ago I downloaded a Sketchup component library that contained models of most of the power equipment you would find in a wood shop. I got it from the downloads/components page of the old Sketchup (pre Google). I don't remember who did the modeling but they graciously put it up there for anyone to download and use. Here is a couple of screen shots of the stuff thats in it….

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Each item is a component group. They are a little low poly, but the detail is pretty good on most of the items. You could easily use any of the models as a starting point to super detail an individual piece of equipment.. The great thing is you could just create a basic room representing your shop and then just drag and drop whatever pieces you have, then move them around, re arrange to your hearts content. You could make a couple of cubes and position them to represent the in-feed/out-feed clearances of certain machines..just paint them with an transparent material like colored glass. Then as you move things around you could instantly see if you are going to have the room for a good work flow. If you wanted to be super precise, you could take rough measurements of your equipment, then re scale the model to be the perfect size. The possibility's are endless!

So I went to the Sketchup downloads/components page to copy the link to the file to post for everyone, but they don't have it up there anymore! Bummer! I was going to just ask people to email me if they wanted a copy of the file, but I had a feeling that allot of people might want the file. So I put it up on my personal web space here is the link http://members.cox.net/fella/Woodworking%20Tools.skp The first time you open it with SU ver 6 you will get a message about it being in and older file format..don't worry just save it when your done playing, and you shouldn't see it again.

Well everyone download the file and start working on your shop layouts! This is a good way to play around with Sketchup without having to do allot of modeling first. Post some screen shots of your virtual shops!
Hi Brad Nailor… I am new to this blog, just tooling around, and saw this post. I tried to connect with the link and got the 404 error. Is there any way I can get the library?

I just got back into woodworking as my next career after many years away from it. I have spent many years in environmental laboratories, and I would rather retire back home and open a little woodshop. So little by little I have been buying tools, and now I got a huge mess in my garage. So these components would be very welcome indeed.

Thanks.
 
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