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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The beginning...

A friend at work collects shot glasses from all over the world and wanted a wall-hanging display cabinet to show them off. She asked me to build it for her out of oak to match her kitchen cabinets. Then she told me she has LOTS of glasses-probably 150 or more. We wrestled with some design issues, but decided on adjustable glass shelves rather than a lattice work type of grid for each glass. The case would have to be big and hold a lot of weight, so I decided that the case should be put together with dovetails for strength and mounted to the wall with a french cleat type of system. I didn't think even a splined miter joint would be a good idea, but may have gotten away with a locking rabbet joint (Opinions welcome…) Anyway, I went about the usual jointing/planing and cutting to size and then set off cutting the joints by hand-my first real attempt on a project after practicing on poplar scraps lying around the shop. After some nervous sawing and chiseling for what seemed like an eternity, they slipped together pretty well.

I dadoed in the back (1/4" ply) and so far so good. It is dry fit together so I've got my measurements for the overlay door.

More to folow.
 

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The beginning...

A friend at work collects shot glasses from all over the world and wanted a wall-hanging display cabinet to show them off. She asked me to build it for her out of oak to match her kitchen cabinets. Then she told me she has LOTS of glasses-probably 150 or more. We wrestled with some design issues, but decided on adjustable glass shelves rather than a lattice work type of grid for each glass. The case would have to be big and hold a lot of weight, so I decided that the case should be put together with dovetails for strength and mounted to the wall with a french cleat type of system. I didn't think even a splined miter joint would be a good idea, but may have gotten away with a locking rabbet joint (Opinions welcome…) Anyway, I went about the usual jointing/planing and cutting to size and then set off cutting the joints by hand-my first real attempt on a project after practicing on poplar scraps lying around the shop. After some nervous sawing and chiseling for what seemed like an eternity, they slipped together pretty well.

I dadoed in the back (1/4" ply) and so far so good. It is dry fit together so I've got my measurements for the overlay door.

More to folow.
As a avid shot glass collector (250+ hey, I have traveled for a living for the last 7 years) I am very interested in your design. As food for thought, here is what someone else did for golf balls.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The beginning...

A friend at work collects shot glasses from all over the world and wanted a wall-hanging display cabinet to show them off. She asked me to build it for her out of oak to match her kitchen cabinets. Then she told me she has LOTS of glasses-probably 150 or more. We wrestled with some design issues, but decided on adjustable glass shelves rather than a lattice work type of grid for each glass. The case would have to be big and hold a lot of weight, so I decided that the case should be put together with dovetails for strength and mounted to the wall with a french cleat type of system. I didn't think even a splined miter joint would be a good idea, but may have gotten away with a locking rabbet joint (Opinions welcome…) Anyway, I went about the usual jointing/planing and cutting to size and then set off cutting the joints by hand-my first real attempt on a project after practicing on poplar scraps lying around the shop. After some nervous sawing and chiseling for what seemed like an eternity, they slipped together pretty well.

I dadoed in the back (1/4" ply) and so far so good. It is dry fit together so I've got my measurements for the overlay door.

More to folow.
I saw that when it was posted. Beautiful work.
 

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The beginning...

A friend at work collects shot glasses from all over the world and wanted a wall-hanging display cabinet to show them off. She asked me to build it for her out of oak to match her kitchen cabinets. Then she told me she has LOTS of glasses-probably 150 or more. We wrestled with some design issues, but decided on adjustable glass shelves rather than a lattice work type of grid for each glass. The case would have to be big and hold a lot of weight, so I decided that the case should be put together with dovetails for strength and mounted to the wall with a french cleat type of system. I didn't think even a splined miter joint would be a good idea, but may have gotten away with a locking rabbet joint (Opinions welcome…) Anyway, I went about the usual jointing/planing and cutting to size and then set off cutting the joints by hand-my first real attempt on a project after practicing on poplar scraps lying around the shop. After some nervous sawing and chiseling for what seemed like an eternity, they slipped together pretty well.

I dadoed in the back (1/4" ply) and so far so good. It is dry fit together so I've got my measurements for the overlay door.

More to folow.
Those dovetails look great
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Making progress

My old shelf pin drilling jig that I made a while back was pretty basic and getting worn out. At least this project forced me to make a new one similar to one I saw ole' Norm use on TV. Worked great while drilling out 108 holes. Once that was done and all interior surfaces sanded to 220, I glued up the case and added in the french cleat in the back. I added the top and bottom and made cove moldings to wrap around top and bottom (yet to be installed). The door is mostly done, but needs the back routed out to accept the glass and a few swipes of the plane to sweeten the edges to match the case. The hard parts are done and I plan to get the molding installed and the hardware put on in the next couple of days if time permits. Fortunately, my friend/"client" didn't want any staining, so I will finish with my usual wipe on oil/poly combo.

 

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Making progress

My old shelf pin drilling jig that I made a while back was pretty basic and getting worn out. At least this project forced me to make a new one similar to one I saw ole' Norm use on TV. Worked great while drilling out 108 holes. Once that was done and all interior surfaces sanded to 220, I glued up the case and added in the french cleat in the back. I added the top and bottom and made cove moldings to wrap around top and bottom (yet to be installed). The door is mostly done, but needs the back routed out to accept the glass and a few swipes of the plane to sweeten the edges to match the case. The hard parts are done and I plan to get the molding installed and the hardware put on in the next couple of days if time permits. Fortunately, my friend/"client" didn't want any staining, so I will finish with my usual wipe on oil/poly combo.

It's full blown cool.great job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Time to finish...

This update's for you Mary K. The woodworking is done and the hardware is in place. I used some "no mortise" hinges I got from our local Woodcraft store. The Woodcraft salesman talked me into them but I don't think I will use them again. Although there's no chopping out a mortise, they do require a fair amount of tweaking to get the up/down and left/right alignment just right. I would rather chop out mortises. My glass will be ready next week so now it is time to finish sanding and start applying the finish.

Left side:


Front:


Right side:


Side view:


Back:
 

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Time to finish...

This update's for you Mary K. The woodworking is done and the hardware is in place. I used some "no mortise" hinges I got from our local Woodcraft store. The Woodcraft salesman talked me into them but I don't think I will use them again. Although there's no chopping out a mortise, they do require a fair amount of tweaking to get the up/down and left/right alignment just right. I would rather chop out mortises. My glass will be ready next week so now it is time to finish sanding and start applying the finish.

Left side:


Front:


Right side:


Side view:


Back:
Still super coool
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ready to hang on a wall...

It's finished! I am still waiting for the interior lighting to arrive before I deliver and install it. There will be a battery powered LED light system in the top to shed light throughout. With all the glass, I hope it won't be too reflective.



I will post it as a project.
 

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Ready to hang on a wall...

It's finished! I am still waiting for the interior lighting to arrive before I deliver and install it. There will be a battery powered LED light system in the top to shed light throughout. With all the glass, I hope it won't be too reflective.



I will post it as a project.
I still think it's cool
 

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Ready to hang on a wall...

It's finished! I am still waiting for the interior lighting to arrive before I deliver and install it. There will be a battery powered LED light system in the top to shed light throughout. With all the glass, I hope it won't be too reflective.



I will post it as a project.
That looks awesome! I've been looking around for something like this. I would like to build my own, but I am not very experienced. Do you know where I could find plans on how to build something like this?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ready to hang on a wall...

It's finished! I am still waiting for the interior lighting to arrive before I deliver and install it. There will be a battery powered LED light system in the top to shed light throughout. With all the glass, I hope it won't be too reflective.



I will post it as a project.
Thanks for the comment. I do not know of any plans per se, but if you want dimensions, etc., let me know. I just designed this based on the dimensions and number of shot glasses and used my usual sketch pad/pencil to work it out.
 

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Ready to hang on a wall...

It's finished! I am still waiting for the interior lighting to arrive before I deliver and install it. There will be a battery powered LED light system in the top to shed light throughout. With all the glass, I hope it won't be too reflective.



I will post it as a project.
Dimensions would be great, thanks. I have a little over a hundred shot glasses that I've collected, but I want to keep my first display case small just to try it out. Kind of like a trial run I guess. What you built is exactly what I have had in mind, only difference is that I plan on putting a mirror in behind the shelves. The mirror I have right now is about two feet wide and three feet high, but I'm not sure if it's going to be the one I end up using. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for taking the time to help me out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ready to hang on a wall...

It's finished! I am still waiting for the interior lighting to arrive before I deliver and install it. There will be a battery powered LED light system in the top to shed light throughout. With all the glass, I hope it won't be too reflective.



I will post it as a project.
All material 4/4 milled to 3/4. Back: 1/4 ply
Interior dimensions: 30"H x 20"W x 4"D
Exterior dimensions: 33"H x 23.375"W x 6.75"D (includes moulding)
Main carcass pieces: Top/Bottom: 21.5" x 5" Sides: 31.5×5"
Back is set in ~1" from the back (Ply thickness plus 3/4). This gives a 3/4" recess to bring the french cleat flush with the back edges. I thought about putting in a mirror as well. I decided on the wood back and interior lighting.
The main carcass is assembled as outlined in the blog. I went with dovetails for strength given the potential weight.
The door dimensions are: 29.75"H x 21.5"W
Once the main carcass with back was glued up, I glued a 3/4×3/4 strip to the front edge of the top and bottom to extend them. (that little exercise was due to a change in design on the fly…never a good idea). I installed the cleat in the back with glue and screws from the top. Then, I attached the top and bottom caps (hiding the screws) and applied the moulding (hiding the joinery details). The door is made with a raised panel router set, but could just as easily be done with grooves and stub tenons on the table saw.
Finish is General Finishes Arm-R-Seal wipe on poly (6 coats), then rubbed out with 0000 steel wool and wax.
I installed a battery operated LED lighting system in the top that is hidden by the door's upper rail. While the LED light is somewhat cold/blue, it is balanced out nicely by the warmth of the wood.

Hope that helps.
 

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Ready to hang on a wall...

It's finished! I am still waiting for the interior lighting to arrive before I deliver and install it. There will be a battery powered LED light system in the top to shed light throughout. With all the glass, I hope it won't be too reflective.



I will post it as a project.
Wow, that was great! That was more information than I was expecting so it will definitely help out a lot. Thank you for taking the time to help me with this. About how much did the supplies cost you so I have an idea on how to budget myself? I think you did such a great job that I would consider paying you to build me one lol.

- Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ready to hang on a wall...

It's finished! I am still waiting for the interior lighting to arrive before I deliver and install it. There will be a battery powered LED light system in the top to shed light throughout. With all the glass, I hope it won't be too reflective.



I will post it as a project.
No problem…that's what LJ is all about. I had about $150.00 in total supplies: $50 for the glass (largest cost due to the polished edges of the glass shelves), $40 for the wood (from my local wood monger and not HD or Lowes which charge more for lower grade material), $20 for the lights, and about $30 in hardware. I also figure in sand paper, finishing supplies, etc. I sold it for $300, which based on what you can find online for $250, is a very reasonable deal. She wants another one now for her international collection and expansion. I'd be happy to build you one as well….for a price. However, its much more satisfying for both of us to see what you come up with on your own!
 

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Ready to hang on a wall...

It's finished! I am still waiting for the interior lighting to arrive before I deliver and install it. There will be a battery powered LED light system in the top to shed light throughout. With all the glass, I hope it won't be too reflective.



I will post it as a project.
Thanks again. I'm going to try it out. The only real experience I have working with wood is putting some molding in a house and raising the celling out on the deck, nothing that really hard. This should get pretty interesting. We'll see, thank you for all your help.

- Paul
 

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Ready to hang on a wall...

It's finished! I am still waiting for the interior lighting to arrive before I deliver and install it. There will be a battery powered LED light system in the top to shed light throughout. With all the glass, I hope it won't be too reflective.



I will post it as a project.
A friend forwarded this to me. Exactly what I've been TRYING to get my husband to build. My shot glass collection is now sitting on open shelves and very dusty. Not good when you actually USE the shot glasses every now and then. Nice job!
 
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