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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Planning the Lumber Rack

EDIT: PHOTOS HAVE BEEN ADDED BELOW IN THE COMMENTS SECTION

I've been inspired by the recent projects of some of my Lumberjocks Buddies (even if they don't know they are my buddies). In particular, I've really liked some of the storage solutions being built by sIKE, Greg Wurst, and Spaids. This is going to be a long post, so if you make it to the end, do you mind posting to let me know if anyone is really reading? I'm going to try and do photos as I work which should be included in part 2 of the blog.

I'm planning to take a long weekend and solve one of my garage shop's biggest problems… Lumber Storage. I've currently got a Triton Rack hanging on one wall of my garage. I like it, but because of the garage layout, I am out of wall space so I can't just add another of this style rack. I'm also struggling a bit with plywood storage so after TONS of searching, I think I found a workable solution. Here is a link to a photo along with the cut-list.

ShopNotes Link

Cut-List

This looks SUPER simple. That's a good thing. The problem is that this requires an awful lot of materials and before I load it up, it will weigh a ton. The plans call for 5 sheets of plywood. Those alone probably weigh 150-200 lbs, maybe more.

My goal is to make a few minor modifications to try and save materials (and money) as well as reduce the overall weight. I'm hoping that this won't reduce the strength in a significant way and I think this can be accomplished. Finally, I want this to have some space for a clamp rack too. Here are my plans with modifications.

1) the bottom will be made out of six 8' 2×4's instead of 1×6 slats with plywood on top. I'll frame it up like floor with supporting joists, but I'll also add 2-3 diagnal joists to help prevent racking when trying to push such a large object. The stored lumber will just rest directly on the 2×4's.

2) instead of the sides being a full sheet of plywood each, I'll cut 1 ft strips off each end making the total length 7 ft. any plywood I store will overhang by 6 inches on each end. I think that's ok because the stored sheet goods will still be plenty supported. I'll just have to be careful when moving around not to run the stored edges into anything that could cause damage. The cut-off from this step will be used in step 5.

3) while I'm lopping the ends of these sheets off, I might as well take 6" inches off the top of each side as well. I just don't think I need a 4×8 foot sheet of plysood to store 4×8 sheet goods. Rip these cut-offs a second time and I've got four 3"x7' strips. These will now be uses as cleats for the shelves.

4) now i need my cut-off bin dividers. the plans call to cut these from the shelving sheets, but I think I can stretch one of the sides I cut earlier even further. I'll admit, this may be the bigest flaw in my design, but I'm going to give it a shot anyway. I'm going to plunge cut four 9"x24" windows out of the side that will support the plywood storage and use these cutouts to make four dividers. I think it will still leave plenty of material behind for strenth in the sides, but will give me 4 of my 6 desired dividers.

5)time to cut up the two 1'x4' scraps from step 2. The first piece will be cut into 8 equal sized, 90 degree triangles. These triangles will be doubled up to attach the wheels and also help to prevent racking of the base. the other scrap piece will be cut into two 6"x4' rectangles. These will attached at the front of the base on the plywood storage side to prevent sheets from sliding off.

Status: So from 2 sheets of plywood, I've got 1 side for plywood support, 1 side for cut-off bin support, 4 shelf support strips, 4 dividers, and 8 wheel supports, and a plyood storage "lip" made in step 5. Not bad (if this actually all works).

Now that we know where we hope to be, on to the final plywood sheet. I still need 3 shelves (I'll have one less than in the picture), 2 more shelf cleats, and 2 more cutoff dividers and a front for the cut-off storage. This won't be possible to get from one sheet, but I'm ok with that. I'll explain at the end.

6) rip 1 ft off the end of the sheet so I'll have 7' material to work with. cut the last two cut-off bin dividers out of the 1' scrap. This will leave the only plywood waste for the entire project, which I estimate to be less than 1.5 sq feet of plywood. This along with a few linear feet of 2×4's seems pretty good to me.

7) rip the 3 smallest shelf sizes from the sheet. Rip two more shelf support strips.

If I did my math/planning right, I've got everything I need with the exception of the front for the cut-off storage. This may be cheating, but I'm thinking of using some old pegboard I've got laying around in order to hang small clamps from. The left and right bin will probably never be used for lumber, but will instead get some clamp storage bolted onto the side.

Again, if you read this whole thing, please let me know. Even better, if you have comments/suggestions, I'd REALLY appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Planning the Lumber Rack

EDIT: PHOTOS HAVE BEEN ADDED BELOW IN THE COMMENTS SECTION

I've been inspired by the recent projects of some of my Lumberjocks Buddies (even if they don't know they are my buddies). In particular, I've really liked some of the storage solutions being built by sIKE, Greg Wurst, and Spaids. This is going to be a long post, so if you make it to the end, do you mind posting to let me know if anyone is really reading? I'm going to try and do photos as I work which should be included in part 2 of the blog.

I'm planning to take a long weekend and solve one of my garage shop's biggest problems… Lumber Storage. I've currently got a Triton Rack hanging on one wall of my garage. I like it, but because of the garage layout, I am out of wall space so I can't just add another of this style rack. I'm also struggling a bit with plywood storage so after TONS of searching, I think I found a workable solution. Here is a link to a photo along with the cut-list.

ShopNotes Link

Cut-List

This looks SUPER simple. That's a good thing. The problem is that this requires an awful lot of materials and before I load it up, it will weigh a ton. The plans call for 5 sheets of plywood. Those alone probably weigh 150-200 lbs, maybe more.

My goal is to make a few minor modifications to try and save materials (and money) as well as reduce the overall weight. I'm hoping that this won't reduce the strength in a significant way and I think this can be accomplished. Finally, I want this to have some space for a clamp rack too. Here are my plans with modifications.

1) the bottom will be made out of six 8' 2×4's instead of 1×6 slats with plywood on top. I'll frame it up like floor with supporting joists, but I'll also add 2-3 diagnal joists to help prevent racking when trying to push such a large object. The stored lumber will just rest directly on the 2×4's.

2) instead of the sides being a full sheet of plywood each, I'll cut 1 ft strips off each end making the total length 7 ft. any plywood I store will overhang by 6 inches on each end. I think that's ok because the stored sheet goods will still be plenty supported. I'll just have to be careful when moving around not to run the stored edges into anything that could cause damage. The cut-off from this step will be used in step 5.

3) while I'm lopping the ends of these sheets off, I might as well take 6" inches off the top of each side as well. I just don't think I need a 4×8 foot sheet of plysood to store 4×8 sheet goods. Rip these cut-offs a second time and I've got four 3"x7' strips. These will now be uses as cleats for the shelves.

4) now i need my cut-off bin dividers. the plans call to cut these from the shelving sheets, but I think I can stretch one of the sides I cut earlier even further. I'll admit, this may be the bigest flaw in my design, but I'm going to give it a shot anyway. I'm going to plunge cut four 9"x24" windows out of the side that will support the plywood storage and use these cutouts to make four dividers. I think it will still leave plenty of material behind for strenth in the sides, but will give me 4 of my 6 desired dividers.

5)time to cut up the two 1'x4' scraps from step 2. The first piece will be cut into 8 equal sized, 90 degree triangles. These triangles will be doubled up to attach the wheels and also help to prevent racking of the base. the other scrap piece will be cut into two 6"x4' rectangles. These will attached at the front of the base on the plywood storage side to prevent sheets from sliding off.

Status: So from 2 sheets of plywood, I've got 1 side for plywood support, 1 side for cut-off bin support, 4 shelf support strips, 4 dividers, and 8 wheel supports, and a plyood storage "lip" made in step 5. Not bad (if this actually all works).

Now that we know where we hope to be, on to the final plywood sheet. I still need 3 shelves (I'll have one less than in the picture), 2 more shelf cleats, and 2 more cutoff dividers and a front for the cut-off storage. This won't be possible to get from one sheet, but I'm ok with that. I'll explain at the end.

6) rip 1 ft off the end of the sheet so I'll have 7' material to work with. cut the last two cut-off bin dividers out of the 1' scrap. This will leave the only plywood waste for the entire project, which I estimate to be less than 1.5 sq feet of plywood. This along with a few linear feet of 2×4's seems pretty good to me.

7) rip the 3 smallest shelf sizes from the sheet. Rip two more shelf support strips.

If I did my math/planning right, I've got everything I need with the exception of the front for the cut-off storage. This may be cheating, but I'm thinking of using some old pegboard I've got laying around in order to hang small clamps from. The left and right bin will probably never be used for lumber, but will instead get some clamp storage bolted onto the side.

Again, if you read this whole thing, please let me know. Even better, if you have comments/suggestions, I'd REALLY appreciate it.
Thanks sIKE. The fridge box is a great idea. It all fits in the space in my head, but you are definitely right that reality could be quite different. I'll give that a go this evening.

I don't have sketch-up drawings, but I did lay it out on some graph paper in excel. I'm going to try and post a screenshot of the sketches this evening, but it will depend on how tough it is to get my daughter to bed. The drawings work out from an assembly standpoint, but I am a bit concerned about it's load bearing capacity. I think I'll be able to tell if I'm pushing it to it's limits before I overload it though. I guess I'll find out soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Planning the Lumber Rack

EDIT: PHOTOS HAVE BEEN ADDED BELOW IN THE COMMENTS SECTION

I've been inspired by the recent projects of some of my Lumberjocks Buddies (even if they don't know they are my buddies). In particular, I've really liked some of the storage solutions being built by sIKE, Greg Wurst, and Spaids. This is going to be a long post, so if you make it to the end, do you mind posting to let me know if anyone is really reading? I'm going to try and do photos as I work which should be included in part 2 of the blog.

I'm planning to take a long weekend and solve one of my garage shop's biggest problems… Lumber Storage. I've currently got a Triton Rack hanging on one wall of my garage. I like it, but because of the garage layout, I am out of wall space so I can't just add another of this style rack. I'm also struggling a bit with plywood storage so after TONS of searching, I think I found a workable solution. Here is a link to a photo along with the cut-list.

ShopNotes Link

Cut-List

This looks SUPER simple. That's a good thing. The problem is that this requires an awful lot of materials and before I load it up, it will weigh a ton. The plans call for 5 sheets of plywood. Those alone probably weigh 150-200 lbs, maybe more.

My goal is to make a few minor modifications to try and save materials (and money) as well as reduce the overall weight. I'm hoping that this won't reduce the strength in a significant way and I think this can be accomplished. Finally, I want this to have some space for a clamp rack too. Here are my plans with modifications.

1) the bottom will be made out of six 8' 2×4's instead of 1×6 slats with plywood on top. I'll frame it up like floor with supporting joists, but I'll also add 2-3 diagnal joists to help prevent racking when trying to push such a large object. The stored lumber will just rest directly on the 2×4's.

2) instead of the sides being a full sheet of plywood each, I'll cut 1 ft strips off each end making the total length 7 ft. any plywood I store will overhang by 6 inches on each end. I think that's ok because the stored sheet goods will still be plenty supported. I'll just have to be careful when moving around not to run the stored edges into anything that could cause damage. The cut-off from this step will be used in step 5.

3) while I'm lopping the ends of these sheets off, I might as well take 6" inches off the top of each side as well. I just don't think I need a 4×8 foot sheet of plysood to store 4×8 sheet goods. Rip these cut-offs a second time and I've got four 3"x7' strips. These will now be uses as cleats for the shelves.

4) now i need my cut-off bin dividers. the plans call to cut these from the shelving sheets, but I think I can stretch one of the sides I cut earlier even further. I'll admit, this may be the bigest flaw in my design, but I'm going to give it a shot anyway. I'm going to plunge cut four 9"x24" windows out of the side that will support the plywood storage and use these cutouts to make four dividers. I think it will still leave plenty of material behind for strenth in the sides, but will give me 4 of my 6 desired dividers.

5)time to cut up the two 1'x4' scraps from step 2. The first piece will be cut into 8 equal sized, 90 degree triangles. These triangles will be doubled up to attach the wheels and also help to prevent racking of the base. the other scrap piece will be cut into two 6"x4' rectangles. These will attached at the front of the base on the plywood storage side to prevent sheets from sliding off.

Status: So from 2 sheets of plywood, I've got 1 side for plywood support, 1 side for cut-off bin support, 4 shelf support strips, 4 dividers, and 8 wheel supports, and a plyood storage "lip" made in step 5. Not bad (if this actually all works).

Now that we know where we hope to be, on to the final plywood sheet. I still need 3 shelves (I'll have one less than in the picture), 2 more shelf cleats, and 2 more cutoff dividers and a front for the cut-off storage. This won't be possible to get from one sheet, but I'm ok with that. I'll explain at the end.

6) rip 1 ft off the end of the sheet so I'll have 7' material to work with. cut the last two cut-off bin dividers out of the 1' scrap. This will leave the only plywood waste for the entire project, which I estimate to be less than 1.5 sq feet of plywood. This along with a few linear feet of 2×4's seems pretty good to me.

7) rip the 3 smallest shelf sizes from the sheet. Rip two more shelf support strips.

If I did my math/planning right, I've got everything I need with the exception of the front for the cut-off storage. This may be cheating, but I'm thinking of using some old pegboard I've got laying around in order to hang small clamps from. The left and right bin will probably never be used for lumber, but will instead get some clamp storage bolted onto the side.

Again, if you read this whole thing, please let me know. Even better, if you have comments/suggestions, I'd REALLY appreciate it.
here are the photos as promised:







I hope this helps to visualize. I don't think anyone is reading this blog (except you sIKE, thanks) but maybe people will come back to this if I do a good job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Planning the Lumber Rack

EDIT: PHOTOS HAVE BEEN ADDED BELOW IN THE COMMENTS SECTION

I've been inspired by the recent projects of some of my Lumberjocks Buddies (even if they don't know they are my buddies). In particular, I've really liked some of the storage solutions being built by sIKE, Greg Wurst, and Spaids. This is going to be a long post, so if you make it to the end, do you mind posting to let me know if anyone is really reading? I'm going to try and do photos as I work which should be included in part 2 of the blog.

I'm planning to take a long weekend and solve one of my garage shop's biggest problems… Lumber Storage. I've currently got a Triton Rack hanging on one wall of my garage. I like it, but because of the garage layout, I am out of wall space so I can't just add another of this style rack. I'm also struggling a bit with plywood storage so after TONS of searching, I think I found a workable solution. Here is a link to a photo along with the cut-list.

ShopNotes Link

Cut-List

This looks SUPER simple. That's a good thing. The problem is that this requires an awful lot of materials and before I load it up, it will weigh a ton. The plans call for 5 sheets of plywood. Those alone probably weigh 150-200 lbs, maybe more.

My goal is to make a few minor modifications to try and save materials (and money) as well as reduce the overall weight. I'm hoping that this won't reduce the strength in a significant way and I think this can be accomplished. Finally, I want this to have some space for a clamp rack too. Here are my plans with modifications.

1) the bottom will be made out of six 8' 2×4's instead of 1×6 slats with plywood on top. I'll frame it up like floor with supporting joists, but I'll also add 2-3 diagnal joists to help prevent racking when trying to push such a large object. The stored lumber will just rest directly on the 2×4's.

2) instead of the sides being a full sheet of plywood each, I'll cut 1 ft strips off each end making the total length 7 ft. any plywood I store will overhang by 6 inches on each end. I think that's ok because the stored sheet goods will still be plenty supported. I'll just have to be careful when moving around not to run the stored edges into anything that could cause damage. The cut-off from this step will be used in step 5.

3) while I'm lopping the ends of these sheets off, I might as well take 6" inches off the top of each side as well. I just don't think I need a 4×8 foot sheet of plysood to store 4×8 sheet goods. Rip these cut-offs a second time and I've got four 3"x7' strips. These will now be uses as cleats for the shelves.

4) now i need my cut-off bin dividers. the plans call to cut these from the shelving sheets, but I think I can stretch one of the sides I cut earlier even further. I'll admit, this may be the bigest flaw in my design, but I'm going to give it a shot anyway. I'm going to plunge cut four 9"x24" windows out of the side that will support the plywood storage and use these cutouts to make four dividers. I think it will still leave plenty of material behind for strenth in the sides, but will give me 4 of my 6 desired dividers.

5)time to cut up the two 1'x4' scraps from step 2. The first piece will be cut into 8 equal sized, 90 degree triangles. These triangles will be doubled up to attach the wheels and also help to prevent racking of the base. the other scrap piece will be cut into two 6"x4' rectangles. These will attached at the front of the base on the plywood storage side to prevent sheets from sliding off.

Status: So from 2 sheets of plywood, I've got 1 side for plywood support, 1 side for cut-off bin support, 4 shelf support strips, 4 dividers, and 8 wheel supports, and a plyood storage "lip" made in step 5. Not bad (if this actually all works).

Now that we know where we hope to be, on to the final plywood sheet. I still need 3 shelves (I'll have one less than in the picture), 2 more shelf cleats, and 2 more cutoff dividers and a front for the cut-off storage. This won't be possible to get from one sheet, but I'm ok with that. I'll explain at the end.

6) rip 1 ft off the end of the sheet so I'll have 7' material to work with. cut the last two cut-off bin dividers out of the 1' scrap. This will leave the only plywood waste for the entire project, which I estimate to be less than 1.5 sq feet of plywood. This along with a few linear feet of 2×4's seems pretty good to me.

7) rip the 3 smallest shelf sizes from the sheet. Rip two more shelf support strips.

If I did my math/planning right, I've got everything I need with the exception of the front for the cut-off storage. This may be cheating, but I'm thinking of using some old pegboard I've got laying around in order to hang small clamps from. The left and right bin will probably never be used for lumber, but will instead get some clamp storage bolted onto the side.

Again, if you read this whole thing, please let me know. Even better, if you have comments/suggestions, I'd REALLY appreciate it.
Wayne,
Here are my last two posts in the series. There are several posts between this one and the two listed below so you can always scroll through those if you are interested in my build process. Good luck.

http://lumberjocks.com/HokieMojo/blog/10536

http://lumberjocks.com/HokieMojo/blog/20834
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Why I Need Storage & the Materials to Fix the Problem

In the previous edition, I stated that I wanted to build a lumber/sheetgood/clamp rack. Here is all the lumber I need it to hold:








In this last photo, you can't see that the lumber goes about 10 boards deep.

Here is my current lumber rack, which as you can see is pretty full. I do love it, but I don't have enough wall space to add another.


Here is the clamp rack that I want to replace. I was about 1/4 way into the project when I found out I was going to be a dad, so all my efforts needed to shift to building a crib. My original plan was to practive some oversized dovetails and things like that, but instead I just slapped it together. Now it is the leaning clamp rack of Pisa. I planned to add another couple of shelves, but I worry that any more weight will topple it, so I'm just going to build new and do it right. Here are the pics.





Lastly, I've got about 5 sheets of oak, poplar, and cherry plywood, some pegboard, and some mdf that need to be stored. No photos of that, but you've seen plywood before.

Off to the hardware store I went. I picked up 3 sheets of pine plywood and five 8ft 2×4's. Here is a photo of all the materials ready to go (missing one 2×4).
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Why I Need Storage & the Materials to Fix the Problem

In the previous edition, I stated that I wanted to build a lumber/sheetgood/clamp rack. Here is all the lumber I need it to hold:








In this last photo, you can't see that the lumber goes about 10 boards deep.

Here is my current lumber rack, which as you can see is pretty full. I do love it, but I don't have enough wall space to add another.


Here is the clamp rack that I want to replace. I was about 1/4 way into the project when I found out I was going to be a dad, so all my efforts needed to shift to building a crib. My original plan was to practive some oversized dovetails and things like that, but instead I just slapped it together. Now it is the leaning clamp rack of Pisa. I planned to add another couple of shelves, but I worry that any more weight will topple it, so I'm just going to build new and do it right. Here are the pics.





Lastly, I've got about 5 sheets of oak, poplar, and cherry plywood, some pegboard, and some mdf that need to be stored. No photos of that, but you've seen plywood before.

Off to the hardware store I went. I picked up 3 sheets of pine plywood and five 8ft 2×4's. Here is a photo of all the materials ready to go (missing one 2×4).
Thanks guys.

Purp,
If you are ever in the area, I'll give you the same deal on the lumber that I got. I probably overbought. I don't think these will fit on your shorts racks though.

I think I have Karson's lumber addiction without his storage space.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
First day of work = 3 hrs of work

I'm taking a few days off of work to spend some tiem with the family. I'm also trying to get a bit of work done on my storage solution. Today was a great day with my wife and baby daughter at the local farmers market and splurging on some pizza at a downtown restaurant, but after that and hanging around playing, I didn't start working in the garage till about 4:00. I didn't do much, but I cleared enough space to work (not easy when the space requires 3 full plywood sheets) and I started framing the base and cutting some panels. Here are some pictures of my work.

First I started framing up the base. I used 4 2×4's for this. Unfortunately, because of my current mess, I can't find my 3" screws. I did have my 3 inch nails though, so I used 1 at each joint to hold it together. I'm going to add the screws after a run to the store tomorrow. I was planning to nail anyway because it feels like they have better shear strength, but the screws really help keep things nice and rigid over time. Here is a shot of the framing.



On top of the base, you can see some plywood. those are the cleats I cut off. They are 3"x7'. Here is a closer shot of those


In addition to cutting the cleats from the long ends of the boards, I cut 1'x4' sections from the short ends. The remaining pieces are 3'x7'. These will be two of the sides and the last piece will be ripped into shelves. You can see that by removing only 1 ft from each edge, I reduce the sq footage from 32 to 21. That reduced the weight (and cost) by 30% without impacting the functionality. Here you can see the size difference. The pine ply I'm using is on the left and an uncut piece of polar is on the right.



Finally, I did have one problem. The plywood is warping some. I planned on this maybe happening, but I didn't think it would warp quite this badly. Thankfully it is only one of the 3 sheets, and I think the design will allow me to easily force the materials back into place. here is a shot of the 3 1'x4' pieces. can you guess which will be cut into the 8 small triangles and which will be reserved for the larger pieces?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
First day of work = 3 hrs of work

I'm taking a few days off of work to spend some tiem with the family. I'm also trying to get a bit of work done on my storage solution. Today was a great day with my wife and baby daughter at the local farmers market and splurging on some pizza at a downtown restaurant, but after that and hanging around playing, I didn't start working in the garage till about 4:00. I didn't do much, but I cleared enough space to work (not easy when the space requires 3 full plywood sheets) and I started framing the base and cutting some panels. Here are some pictures of my work.

First I started framing up the base. I used 4 2×4's for this. Unfortunately, because of my current mess, I can't find my 3" screws. I did have my 3 inch nails though, so I used 1 at each joint to hold it together. I'm going to add the screws after a run to the store tomorrow. I was planning to nail anyway because it feels like they have better shear strength, but the screws really help keep things nice and rigid over time. Here is a shot of the framing.



On top of the base, you can see some plywood. those are the cleats I cut off. They are 3"x7'. Here is a closer shot of those


In addition to cutting the cleats from the long ends of the boards, I cut 1'x4' sections from the short ends. The remaining pieces are 3'x7'. These will be two of the sides and the last piece will be ripped into shelves. You can see that by removing only 1 ft from each edge, I reduce the sq footage from 32 to 21. That reduced the weight (and cost) by 30% without impacting the functionality. Here you can see the size difference. The pine ply I'm using is on the left and an uncut piece of polar is on the right.



Finally, I did have one problem. The plywood is warping some. I planned on this maybe happening, but I didn't think it would warp quite this badly. Thankfully it is only one of the 3 sheets, and I think the design will allow me to easily force the materials back into place. here is a shot of the 3 1'x4' pieces. can you guess which will be cut into the 8 small triangles and which will be reserved for the larger pieces?
thanks spaids. I'm not the best writer, but hopefully people can follow.

As for the buckets, the funny thing is that I had so much trouble finding 4 that were the same size. It seems they are constantly changing, but you are right, they come in handy for all sorts of things from derusting, to doubling as low sawhorses, to being one of my current cut-off bins.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Lots of Work - Minimal Results

Before I start, if anyone has any suggestions to make my blog more readable, please let me know. I spend about an hour on each entry and I still feel that they are severely lacking. I can't do much about the topics since I only blog what I'm working on. I try to include photos too. I may be a bit long winded though. Any criticism would REALLY be appreciated.

I debated whether to post today because it doesn't look like I did much, although I think I did lots with few visual results. I committed to blogging this project through to the end since I think I can finish it on my week off, so I guess I should do it right. I should take one moment to say that my wife has been very good about taking care of our daughter during the day so I can work on this, but there is one catch. My daughter's playpen shares a wall with the garage. We are also trying to get her used to afternoon naps, so anytime it looks like she might zonk out, power tools have to go off. Inevitably she is ready to sleep anytime I finish laying out my cuts and have just put on my safety equipment. I spent 5 hrs working today, but probably could have done this in 3-4 if I was on my own schedule.

In the morning I ran some errands and one of those errands was to get 3" screws. That allowed me to firm up the base that I had just nailed together the prior day. I decided diagnal bracing with 2×4's wasn't necessary because of a couple design modifications (covered later).

Now that the base was nailed and screwed, I needed to add my wheel supports. These came from a 1'x4' piece. Here is is marked for cutting. Hopefully you can see the 8 triangles.


After cutting them I tried to double them up with glue. I know the clamping pressure is not sufiicient for that much surface area. I thought it would make it easier to assemble everything, but changed my mind after the first two.




Now I've got somewhere to attach the wheels once I decide which to use. Here is what I've got

4 of these:


or two of each of these:


I've still got a day to think about the wheel choices. Now I flip over the base so it is right side up and start working my way upward. Here is the first change I made. I realized that while my design modifications would be fine for long lumber storage, I kind of need a floor to support the upright shorts. So, I'm swapping out a 2×4 from the original plans with a 1×6 to be used later. Now, the 2 pieces of 4'x6" plywood I cut yesterday are going to become part of the base. Here you can see it glued up. IT will serve as a floor for the cutoffs and will give an edge for the "A-frame" type structure to push against.


I also decided I'm going to use some scrap shelving to make a floor for the plywood. I'm certain that I could store the plywood across the exposed 2×4's but it might do some damage to the edges, particularly when trying to load and unload the 3/4" pieces. This is my 3rd cheat (1st was using old pegboard, 2nd was swapping out a 2×4 for a 1×6 (although the 1×6 was even cheaper)).

Now I need to start in on some of these large sides. I layed out the windows on the plywood support side. I plunge cut with the circular saw. This did scare me a bit because it feels like I'm cutting on a table saw without a fence or miter gauge. I'm not sure what the difference is except for maybe h.p.m but I guess it worked fine. here are the pictures




Once all is done, it looks like this:



So here is what I still need to do.
1 attach wheels
2 Attach the MDF to the base for the plywood storage side.
3 Attach the cleats
4 Cut the shelves to width and angle the edges to match the slant of the sides (the sides will be 18" apart at the base, with 3 subsequent shelves being 16", 14", and 12".
5 Attach the shelves
6 layout the dividers (unless you guys think my plunge cuts came out perfectly straight)
7 attach dividers
8 attach the front of the cut-off bin
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Lots of Work - Minimal Results

Before I start, if anyone has any suggestions to make my blog more readable, please let me know. I spend about an hour on each entry and I still feel that they are severely lacking. I can't do much about the topics since I only blog what I'm working on. I try to include photos too. I may be a bit long winded though. Any criticism would REALLY be appreciated.

I debated whether to post today because it doesn't look like I did much, although I think I did lots with few visual results. I committed to blogging this project through to the end since I think I can finish it on my week off, so I guess I should do it right. I should take one moment to say that my wife has been very good about taking care of our daughter during the day so I can work on this, but there is one catch. My daughter's playpen shares a wall with the garage. We are also trying to get her used to afternoon naps, so anytime it looks like she might zonk out, power tools have to go off. Inevitably she is ready to sleep anytime I finish laying out my cuts and have just put on my safety equipment. I spent 5 hrs working today, but probably could have done this in 3-4 if I was on my own schedule.

In the morning I ran some errands and one of those errands was to get 3" screws. That allowed me to firm up the base that I had just nailed together the prior day. I decided diagnal bracing with 2×4's wasn't necessary because of a couple design modifications (covered later).

Now that the base was nailed and screwed, I needed to add my wheel supports. These came from a 1'x4' piece. Here is is marked for cutting. Hopefully you can see the 8 triangles.


After cutting them I tried to double them up with glue. I know the clamping pressure is not sufiicient for that much surface area. I thought it would make it easier to assemble everything, but changed my mind after the first two.




Now I've got somewhere to attach the wheels once I decide which to use. Here is what I've got

4 of these:


or two of each of these:


I've still got a day to think about the wheel choices. Now I flip over the base so it is right side up and start working my way upward. Here is the first change I made. I realized that while my design modifications would be fine for long lumber storage, I kind of need a floor to support the upright shorts. So, I'm swapping out a 2×4 from the original plans with a 1×6 to be used later. Now, the 2 pieces of 4'x6" plywood I cut yesterday are going to become part of the base. Here you can see it glued up. IT will serve as a floor for the cutoffs and will give an edge for the "A-frame" type structure to push against.


I also decided I'm going to use some scrap shelving to make a floor for the plywood. I'm certain that I could store the plywood across the exposed 2×4's but it might do some damage to the edges, particularly when trying to load and unload the 3/4" pieces. This is my 3rd cheat (1st was using old pegboard, 2nd was swapping out a 2×4 for a 1×6 (although the 1×6 was even cheaper)).

Now I need to start in on some of these large sides. I layed out the windows on the plywood support side. I plunge cut with the circular saw. This did scare me a bit because it feels like I'm cutting on a table saw without a fence or miter gauge. I'm not sure what the difference is except for maybe h.p.m but I guess it worked fine. here are the pictures




Once all is done, it looks like this:



So here is what I still need to do.
1 attach wheels
2 Attach the MDF to the base for the plywood storage side.
3 Attach the cleats
4 Cut the shelves to width and angle the edges to match the slant of the sides (the sides will be 18" apart at the base, with 3 subsequent shelves being 16", 14", and 12".
5 Attach the shelves
6 layout the dividers (unless you guys think my plunge cuts came out perfectly straight)
7 attach dividers
8 attach the front of the cut-off bin
Thanks for the encouragement. It is good to know someone gets something from this. I know that personally, I've grown to enjoy reading the blogs more than the project postings. Blogs are always almost always more original than the projects. I still enjoy the projects, but they have become a bit repetivie now that the site has grown so large.

I'll take your advice on the casters and go with all 4 locking swivels. I was thinking a wider mounting plate might make the black casters better, but I can se what you mean and will go with red.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Sides are 1/2 way done

First off, I'm amazed by people that crank out quality projects. This construction grade project has been slow going and there really isn't too much detail. The heat is also really wearing on me so I only did about 4 hrs today. I doubt it looks like 4 hours of work, but lots of predrilling and lots of screws.

I started off with the objective of finishing the base. I needed to complete the floor for the plywood storage and attach the wheels. The shelf floor went on just fine. The wheels weren't quite as easy. Here is a picture after getting the wheels on.



The problem with the wheels was that I assumed the stems would be long enough to go through the plywood wheel supports. I used doubled up 3/4" ply. As you can see, they weren't long enough.



What I did was I drilled a hole with a spade bit into the top of the supports. It was just large enough to get a washer into the hole (1" wide maybe). I drilled through three layers of ply. This worked well because as I went through each layer I could see the black glue. It made for the easiest measuring of the project so far. I then finished with a 3/8's bit all the way through. I don't know if this will weaken the structure. personally, I don't think so, but we'll see.

The other mistake I made was I had already attached the wheel supports thinking I could just slide my ratchet in there. I needed to disassemble everything and then put it back together. up to this point i probably spent 1.5 hrs btu at least 15 minutes was kicking myself for not realizing my mistake. all in all though, not a big deal.

On to the sides!

I left the base with a 19.5 gap between the floor of the plywood and the floor for the offcuts. after subtracting 1.5 inches for the plywood thickness, that leaves 18 inches at the base. the sides are 42 inched high. I'll put a shelf ever 13 inches. this means that every 13 inches, the sides will slant one inch inward (on each side) I think that will be plenty to keep material leaning but not so much that it causes additional downward stress.

I measured each 13" increment and marked up the plywood. here are 4 shots (2 of each side) of the cleats being glued into place and screwed in, mostly to pull the parts tight during gluing. I was shocked that I used as many screws and as much glue as I did. I've already used a whole small bottle and a whole box of screws (although they were varied sizes).









I was careful to try and keep the bow in the plywood pieces going the opposite direction of one another. I don't think it will make a significant difference, but every little bit will help. Screwing the shelving in will really line everything up and make it much more rigid.

I'm actually really pleased with the progress. I think tomorrow I'm going to take a day off and just rest up. Then on Monday I'll try and finish this thing off. I'll need to rip the shelves to their final width and figure out a way to hold up the sides while I work on getting the parts in place. I'll also need to screw the sides to the base. If that gets done in less than 2 hrs, I might start on the dividers for the cutoff bins.

One final note, thanks to everyone for their advice on the casters. I was using the base as my workbench and I locked the casters. They didn't go anywhere. once I was done, I put the last piece of plywood on it to simulate the weight of the structure (unloaded). After unlocking them I could easily move it with one hand. So far, I'm thrilled. I hope they work as well when I put another 700 lbs on it.

One FINAL FINAL note. here is a shot of the scrap pile. If not for the mdf, that was already scrap, I'd be at virtually 0 (1' x 6" plus sawdust). I'm not soing this just to do it, I'm just trying to keep costs down after my wife has been so good about saving money recently. I may use some of the mdf scrap anyway when making some of the clamp rack attachments, but I'll decide all of that stuff at a later date.

 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Sides are 1/2 way done

First off, I'm amazed by people that crank out quality projects. This construction grade project has been slow going and there really isn't too much detail. The heat is also really wearing on me so I only did about 4 hrs today. I doubt it looks like 4 hours of work, but lots of predrilling and lots of screws.

I started off with the objective of finishing the base. I needed to complete the floor for the plywood storage and attach the wheels. The shelf floor went on just fine. The wheels weren't quite as easy. Here is a picture after getting the wheels on.



The problem with the wheels was that I assumed the stems would be long enough to go through the plywood wheel supports. I used doubled up 3/4" ply. As you can see, they weren't long enough.



What I did was I drilled a hole with a spade bit into the top of the supports. It was just large enough to get a washer into the hole (1" wide maybe). I drilled through three layers of ply. This worked well because as I went through each layer I could see the black glue. It made for the easiest measuring of the project so far. I then finished with a 3/8's bit all the way through. I don't know if this will weaken the structure. personally, I don't think so, but we'll see.

The other mistake I made was I had already attached the wheel supports thinking I could just slide my ratchet in there. I needed to disassemble everything and then put it back together. up to this point i probably spent 1.5 hrs btu at least 15 minutes was kicking myself for not realizing my mistake. all in all though, not a big deal.

On to the sides!

I left the base with a 19.5 gap between the floor of the plywood and the floor for the offcuts. after subtracting 1.5 inches for the plywood thickness, that leaves 18 inches at the base. the sides are 42 inched high. I'll put a shelf ever 13 inches. this means that every 13 inches, the sides will slant one inch inward (on each side) I think that will be plenty to keep material leaning but not so much that it causes additional downward stress.

I measured each 13" increment and marked up the plywood. here are 4 shots (2 of each side) of the cleats being glued into place and screwed in, mostly to pull the parts tight during gluing. I was shocked that I used as many screws and as much glue as I did. I've already used a whole small bottle and a whole box of screws (although they were varied sizes).









I was careful to try and keep the bow in the plywood pieces going the opposite direction of one another. I don't think it will make a significant difference, but every little bit will help. Screwing the shelving in will really line everything up and make it much more rigid.

I'm actually really pleased with the progress. I think tomorrow I'm going to take a day off and just rest up. Then on Monday I'll try and finish this thing off. I'll need to rip the shelves to their final width and figure out a way to hold up the sides while I work on getting the parts in place. I'll also need to screw the sides to the base. If that gets done in less than 2 hrs, I might start on the dividers for the cutoff bins.

One final note, thanks to everyone for their advice on the casters. I was using the base as my workbench and I locked the casters. They didn't go anywhere. once I was done, I put the last piece of plywood on it to simulate the weight of the structure (unloaded). After unlocking them I could easily move it with one hand. So far, I'm thrilled. I hope they work as well when I put another 700 lbs on it.

One FINAL FINAL note. here is a shot of the scrap pile. If not for the mdf, that was already scrap, I'd be at virtually 0 (1' x 6" plus sawdust). I'm not soing this just to do it, I'm just trying to keep costs down after my wife has been so good about saving money recently. I may use some of the mdf scrap anyway when making some of the clamp rack attachments, but I'll decide all of that stuff at a later date.

just what I'd need, another way to hurt myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Sides are 1/2 way done

First off, I'm amazed by people that crank out quality projects. This construction grade project has been slow going and there really isn't too much detail. The heat is also really wearing on me so I only did about 4 hrs today. I doubt it looks like 4 hours of work, but lots of predrilling and lots of screws.

I started off with the objective of finishing the base. I needed to complete the floor for the plywood storage and attach the wheels. The shelf floor went on just fine. The wheels weren't quite as easy. Here is a picture after getting the wheels on.



The problem with the wheels was that I assumed the stems would be long enough to go through the plywood wheel supports. I used doubled up 3/4" ply. As you can see, they weren't long enough.



What I did was I drilled a hole with a spade bit into the top of the supports. It was just large enough to get a washer into the hole (1" wide maybe). I drilled through three layers of ply. This worked well because as I went through each layer I could see the black glue. It made for the easiest measuring of the project so far. I then finished with a 3/8's bit all the way through. I don't know if this will weaken the structure. personally, I don't think so, but we'll see.

The other mistake I made was I had already attached the wheel supports thinking I could just slide my ratchet in there. I needed to disassemble everything and then put it back together. up to this point i probably spent 1.5 hrs btu at least 15 minutes was kicking myself for not realizing my mistake. all in all though, not a big deal.

On to the sides!

I left the base with a 19.5 gap between the floor of the plywood and the floor for the offcuts. after subtracting 1.5 inches for the plywood thickness, that leaves 18 inches at the base. the sides are 42 inched high. I'll put a shelf ever 13 inches. this means that every 13 inches, the sides will slant one inch inward (on each side) I think that will be plenty to keep material leaning but not so much that it causes additional downward stress.

I measured each 13" increment and marked up the plywood. here are 4 shots (2 of each side) of the cleats being glued into place and screwed in, mostly to pull the parts tight during gluing. I was shocked that I used as many screws and as much glue as I did. I've already used a whole small bottle and a whole box of screws (although they were varied sizes).









I was careful to try and keep the bow in the plywood pieces going the opposite direction of one another. I don't think it will make a significant difference, but every little bit will help. Screwing the shelving in will really line everything up and make it much more rigid.

I'm actually really pleased with the progress. I think tomorrow I'm going to take a day off and just rest up. Then on Monday I'll try and finish this thing off. I'll need to rip the shelves to their final width and figure out a way to hold up the sides while I work on getting the parts in place. I'll also need to screw the sides to the base. If that gets done in less than 2 hrs, I might start on the dividers for the cutoff bins.

One final note, thanks to everyone for their advice on the casters. I was using the base as my workbench and I locked the casters. They didn't go anywhere. once I was done, I put the last piece of plywood on it to simulate the weight of the structure (unloaded). After unlocking them I could easily move it with one hand. So far, I'm thrilled. I hope they work as well when I put another 700 lbs on it.

One FINAL FINAL note. here is a shot of the scrap pile. If not for the mdf, that was already scrap, I'd be at virtually 0 (1' x 6" plus sawdust). I'm not soing this just to do it, I'm just trying to keep costs down after my wife has been so good about saving money recently. I may use some of the mdf scrap anyway when making some of the clamp rack attachments, but I'll decide all of that stuff at a later date.

It is big. I'm a little worried about how much weight these casters will be able to take. I'll adjust accordingly, but I'm hopeing they can hold about 1000 lbs. I think the project itself may be around 200lbs alone. once I add 7-8 sheets of 3/4 ply, drywall, or mdf thats a lot. the lumber storage, I can't even guess atthe wieght. Then the pipe clamps will be quite heavy on the otehr side. I guess I'll just load it till it becomes awkward to push or it starts to make creaking noises. lol.

Tomorrow it should really start to take shape.maybe people will be able to tell what it is supposed to look like.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Sides are 1/2 way done

First off, I'm amazed by people that crank out quality projects. This construction grade project has been slow going and there really isn't too much detail. The heat is also really wearing on me so I only did about 4 hrs today. I doubt it looks like 4 hours of work, but lots of predrilling and lots of screws.

I started off with the objective of finishing the base. I needed to complete the floor for the plywood storage and attach the wheels. The shelf floor went on just fine. The wheels weren't quite as easy. Here is a picture after getting the wheels on.



The problem with the wheels was that I assumed the stems would be long enough to go through the plywood wheel supports. I used doubled up 3/4" ply. As you can see, they weren't long enough.



What I did was I drilled a hole with a spade bit into the top of the supports. It was just large enough to get a washer into the hole (1" wide maybe). I drilled through three layers of ply. This worked well because as I went through each layer I could see the black glue. It made for the easiest measuring of the project so far. I then finished with a 3/8's bit all the way through. I don't know if this will weaken the structure. personally, I don't think so, but we'll see.

The other mistake I made was I had already attached the wheel supports thinking I could just slide my ratchet in there. I needed to disassemble everything and then put it back together. up to this point i probably spent 1.5 hrs btu at least 15 minutes was kicking myself for not realizing my mistake. all in all though, not a big deal.

On to the sides!

I left the base with a 19.5 gap between the floor of the plywood and the floor for the offcuts. after subtracting 1.5 inches for the plywood thickness, that leaves 18 inches at the base. the sides are 42 inched high. I'll put a shelf ever 13 inches. this means that every 13 inches, the sides will slant one inch inward (on each side) I think that will be plenty to keep material leaning but not so much that it causes additional downward stress.

I measured each 13" increment and marked up the plywood. here are 4 shots (2 of each side) of the cleats being glued into place and screwed in, mostly to pull the parts tight during gluing. I was shocked that I used as many screws and as much glue as I did. I've already used a whole small bottle and a whole box of screws (although they were varied sizes).









I was careful to try and keep the bow in the plywood pieces going the opposite direction of one another. I don't think it will make a significant difference, but every little bit will help. Screwing the shelving in will really line everything up and make it much more rigid.

I'm actually really pleased with the progress. I think tomorrow I'm going to take a day off and just rest up. Then on Monday I'll try and finish this thing off. I'll need to rip the shelves to their final width and figure out a way to hold up the sides while I work on getting the parts in place. I'll also need to screw the sides to the base. If that gets done in less than 2 hrs, I might start on the dividers for the cutoff bins.

One final note, thanks to everyone for their advice on the casters. I was using the base as my workbench and I locked the casters. They didn't go anywhere. once I was done, I put the last piece of plywood on it to simulate the weight of the structure (unloaded). After unlocking them I could easily move it with one hand. So far, I'm thrilled. I hope they work as well when I put another 700 lbs on it.

One FINAL FINAL note. here is a shot of the scrap pile. If not for the mdf, that was already scrap, I'd be at virtually 0 (1' x 6" plus sawdust). I'm not soing this just to do it, I'm just trying to keep costs down after my wife has been so good about saving money recently. I may use some of the mdf scrap anyway when making some of the clamp rack attachments, but I'll decide all of that stuff at a later date.

i guess i can always go back and add some. I had thought about trying 6, but I've been told it often causes more problems than it helps. If anyone else has thoughts on this, I'd appreciate hearing them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Now it looks like a lumber rack

Well, I've got some bad news for the 3-4 people reading my blog. This is going to be the last post for a while. I was hoping to finish everything during my vacation, but it won't be done in time and I've got a few other things I need to do over the next few weeks.

The good news is that I'm just about done. The last few steps will be kind of time consuming with minimal results, so I don't think anyone will be dying to see the next few posts. I will blog them when I do them though, I just don't know when it will be. I'd really like to get a parking space back for my wife and that requires some serious cleanup. Here are the pictures for today though. Sorry again to those who have been keeping up. Before I get into the build, heere is a sneak peak at the results.

Before:


After:


Before:


After:

That's just pressure treated junk. i don't want it with the good stuff, so it doesn't count.

Before:


After:


I know, the last photos are the same in the before and after. I told you I didn't finish! So, you thought you'd get a sneak preview of the project? nope. keep reading for those pictures.

I didn't get a shot of me ripping the shelves to length, but basically they are 12, 14, and 16 inches wide by 7 ft long. It was the last piece of large plywood I had left. once they were ripped, the trick was to get them into place. I was basically leaning the two sides against one another, then prying them apart to try and slide shelves in between. At one point, I had all the shelves resting on the cleats, but the assembly wouldn't stay balanced and upright. I was stuck…. Literally….

Thankfully, after me standing there holding them for about 15 minutes my wife came down to ask me something and I jumped at the chance for a hand. She kept it balanced while I clamped everything up. Then I just snapped some chalk lines where the shelves would be and started predrilling holes every 8 inches. I applied some glue and also used 2.25 inch coarse thread screws to pull everything tight. Here is a shot of me about to screw in the last shelf. It was in so tight after attaching the top two shelves that I didn't bother to glue it. I hope I don't' regret it.





You can see the screws sticking out. I gotta say, this is one more time where my corded dewalt drill really came through for me. I have abused that thing so badly over the years, and it still runs like a champ. normally, it is one of my most under appreciated tools, but projects like this remind me what a solid piece of machinery it is.

Once all the screws were in place it was time to start loading it up. First, here is a shot to give you an idea of how much storage is in here.


Time to start loading up the plywood. I think that will be a good test since it will put a lot of weight on the assembly without stressing the shelves. here is a shot of the plywood in place (and some scraps of pegboard and drywall).



I'd estimate there are about 500 sq feet of sheet goods on there. Probably 200 of 3/4", 50 of 1/2" and the rest 1/4". I think that works out to about 250 board feet of wood right there. So far so good. It isn't making any noises or flexing and I can still easily move it with one hand.

I guess its time to start adding lumber. Now or never right? I'll admit I was nervous. Here are hose shots.









As you can see in the last photo, there is nothing on the one side of the project. I've still got the material to cut dividers and the pegboard you saw earlier will be used as a wall to hold it all in. I'm hoping it allows me to hang a few small clamps from it, but I don't know if that is a great storage location. they may get knocked off too easily.

Another change I plan to make is that I don't plan on having the cutoff bins go all the way across. I think they will sit in the middle and I'll have clamp storage on the flanks. maybe it will be vise versa. Any suggestions? Thanks to everyone for sticking with me this far. I will do more, I just work rather slowly.

PS - When I loaded all the lumber, I must have hit a tipping point. It suddenly became MUCH harder to move. I can still move it with one hand, but guiding it requires both and some effort. I am going to try and use up some of this material I've got before buying any more for a while. That is the plan at least. This thing probably weighs about 800 lbs right now. If that's accurate (just based on board foot calculations and my 35 lbs per 1/2 thick sheetgoods assumption) I could probably go to 1,000 lbs without problems. I'd like to get more wight moved to the bottom but I have a few more screws to drive down there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
A final descision on the sheet goods storage

I finally made up my mind about what to do with the lumber rack in the last blog post.



The theory was that the behemoth of a rack would sit in the right bay of my garage. When I wanted to do some woodworking, I'd pull my wife's car out, push the rack into her spot, and then I could work at my bench. I know you don't see it in the photo above, but the opposite side would hold tons of tools and clamps. That means that right behind me would be everything I needed at my reach.

Reality was very different from what I had envisioned. The rack ultimately ended up at about 1500 lbs and was difficult to move. It was also impossible to get anythign done if the car was still there.

I finally needed to make a change. As you've seen, I removed a triton lumber rack, built another of my own racks, and rebuilt the sheet goods storage. The first two items can be seen here:
http://lumberjocks.com/HokieMojo/blog/16458

The last change can be seen in this photo with the sheet goods upright. As a result of the rebuild, I got a lb of screws back and some scrap boards.


The sheet goods storage is satisfactorily stable, but I changed it to the wall just in case. I'll only unhook it when I need to get something off it. On the end I was able to some hardware storage (photo below) and on the back I leaned my pipes from my pipe clamps (no photo, sorry).


One final Bittersweet addition to the shop though. I've wanted a freezer for the longest time to lower our grocery bills while allowing us to buy some healthier food options in bulk. It hurts to give up so much shop space, but it is the only good place for me to keep it.


I hope you like the update. I will have a few more posts soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Mobile Tool Cart (with photos)

This post relates to a project I've been designing in my mind for a couple of years. I've had a lot of trouble figuring out exactly how I wanted to configure everything on my cart to effectively utilize 4 bench tools (miter saw saw, band saw, drill press, and bench grinder) while still fitting a lot of storage underneath and remaining mobile.

Here is what I built


It is about 3 feet tall (not counting the casters) is 4 feet wide, and is 20" deep. I used about 1 1/2 sheets of 3/4 inch poplar plywood and half a sheet of 1/4 ply for the back. I bought casters online. They seem to work well. I'll try to remember to post a a review of them.



I think the most important part of the build is the layout of the bench tools on the top. I can cut a 3 ft piece of lumber on the miter saw without extra support. I also have good access to the drill press and bandsaw with zero interference from other tools. All the dust collection of the tools point in the same direction so hooking up some hoses to a shop vac should be easy enough. Here is an overhead shot so you can see the layout.



I know I mentioned that it holds four bench tools. The fourth tool would be the bench grinder. That will temporarily be put right in front of the bandsaw. I think that will work fine for the occasional use it gets.

Here is a shot of the storage that the cart offers. This is more than any other item in my shop offers:



Finally, here is a shot of one of the sides. I plan to hang some tools on there like my framing square, speed square, some smaller tools like my mallet, chisels, etc. On the other side I'll probably hang my shop vac hoses, pipes, and attachments.

 

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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
Mobile Tool Cart (with photos)

This post relates to a project I've been designing in my mind for a couple of years. I've had a lot of trouble figuring out exactly how I wanted to configure everything on my cart to effectively utilize 4 bench tools (miter saw saw, band saw, drill press, and bench grinder) while still fitting a lot of storage underneath and remaining mobile.

Here is what I built


It is about 3 feet tall (not counting the casters) is 4 feet wide, and is 20" deep. I used about 1 1/2 sheets of 3/4 inch poplar plywood and half a sheet of 1/4 ply for the back. I bought casters online. They seem to work well. I'll try to remember to post a a review of them.



I think the most important part of the build is the layout of the bench tools on the top. I can cut a 3 ft piece of lumber on the miter saw without extra support. I also have good access to the drill press and bandsaw with zero interference from other tools. All the dust collection of the tools point in the same direction so hooking up some hoses to a shop vac should be easy enough. Here is an overhead shot so you can see the layout.



I know I mentioned that it holds four bench tools. The fourth tool would be the bench grinder. That will temporarily be put right in front of the bandsaw. I think that will work fine for the occasional use it gets.

Here is a shot of the storage that the cart offers. This is more than any other item in my shop offers:



Finally, here is a shot of one of the sides. I plan to hang some tools on there like my framing square, speed square, some smaller tools like my mallet, chisels, etc. On the other side I'll probably hang my shop vac hoses, pipes, and attachments.

Thanks for the compliments everyone.

Vicki,
For the price, I like it. I don't remember off the top of my head, but I think it was a 10 inch. I think 14 is the usual size for being able to resaw wider boards. I'd upgrade to that in a heartbeat if it was in the budget, but for now I'm quite content. Because I plan to upgrade though, I am not investing much more in blades so I'm limited to the 2 high grade blades I bought at the outset.
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Mobile Tool Cart (with photos)

This post relates to a project I've been designing in my mind for a couple of years. I've had a lot of trouble figuring out exactly how I wanted to configure everything on my cart to effectively utilize 4 bench tools (miter saw saw, band saw, drill press, and bench grinder) while still fitting a lot of storage underneath and remaining mobile.

Here is what I built


It is about 3 feet tall (not counting the casters) is 4 feet wide, and is 20" deep. I used about 1 1/2 sheets of 3/4 inch poplar plywood and half a sheet of 1/4 ply for the back. I bought casters online. They seem to work well. I'll try to remember to post a a review of them.



I think the most important part of the build is the layout of the bench tools on the top. I can cut a 3 ft piece of lumber on the miter saw without extra support. I also have good access to the drill press and bandsaw with zero interference from other tools. All the dust collection of the tools point in the same direction so hooking up some hoses to a shop vac should be easy enough. Here is an overhead shot so you can see the layout.



I know I mentioned that it holds four bench tools. The fourth tool would be the bench grinder. That will temporarily be put right in front of the bandsaw. I think that will work fine for the occasional use it gets.

Here is a shot of the storage that the cart offers. This is more than any other item in my shop offers:



Finally, here is a shot of one of the sides. I plan to hang some tools on there like my framing square, speed square, some smaller tools like my mallet, chisels, etc. On the other side I'll probably hang my shop vac hoses, pipes, and attachments.

Hey Purp,
I assure you, it is just the camera. If you look at my first photo, the top and bottom look like they are sagging. If you look at the 4th photo, the top looks like it is arched and the bottom still looks like it is sagging. I've had this problem with the camera I'm using for a while now, but the lens distorts the photos. I DO appreciate looking out for me though. Also, the back plywood is screwed in to all the framing to add rigidity and that really helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
Mobile Tool Cart (with photos)

This post relates to a project I've been designing in my mind for a couple of years. I've had a lot of trouble figuring out exactly how I wanted to configure everything on my cart to effectively utilize 4 bench tools (miter saw saw, band saw, drill press, and bench grinder) while still fitting a lot of storage underneath and remaining mobile.

Here is what I built


It is about 3 feet tall (not counting the casters) is 4 feet wide, and is 20" deep. I used about 1 1/2 sheets of 3/4 inch poplar plywood and half a sheet of 1/4 ply for the back. I bought casters online. They seem to work well. I'll try to remember to post a a review of them.



I think the most important part of the build is the layout of the bench tools on the top. I can cut a 3 ft piece of lumber on the miter saw without extra support. I also have good access to the drill press and bandsaw with zero interference from other tools. All the dust collection of the tools point in the same direction so hooking up some hoses to a shop vac should be easy enough. Here is an overhead shot so you can see the layout.



I know I mentioned that it holds four bench tools. The fourth tool would be the bench grinder. That will temporarily be put right in front of the bandsaw. I think that will work fine for the occasional use it gets.

Here is a shot of the storage that the cart offers. This is more than any other item in my shop offers:



Finally, here is a shot of one of the sides. I plan to hang some tools on there like my framing square, speed square, some smaller tools like my mallet, chisels, etc. On the other side I'll probably hang my shop vac hoses, pipes, and attachments.

I think the toughest part is getting the blade tight enough. Right when you are about to get it where you want it, it turns out that it is overtightened for such a small saw. lol. It is frustrating. I think I'd have an easier time if I weren't using a 1/2" blade almost all the time.
 
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