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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Challenges and A Plan

I've been woodworking for about 5 years now. My workspace has been in my uninsulated and unfinished, attached garage. I originally thought that I'd make smaller projects so I could park both cars in the garage and pull them out when it was time to work. To accomplish this, I just made 2 benches from 3/4 mdf. the benches were 30" x 8' and 36" x 4'. They weren't very stable and they cluttered up quickly with benchtop tools and my current projects. Then the cars fit so tight, it just didn't seem worth the hassle. It's time to reevaluate.

I love my house. We saved for many many years to be able to buy it. It's nothing outsiders would be impressed with, but it's got everything my family needs. The lack of an ideal workshop space is my only complaint, so rather than spend my time dreaming of moving out of a house that's already a great fit for me, I need to renovate and make the best of a GOOD situation.

I've got too much stuff to keep parking 2 cars and I've promised my wife she won't lose her spot. That means I've got about a 24' x 11' space to work with, but only about 20' of wall space. Thankfully I'm also stealing the wall space on my wife's side of the garage to keep my lumber rack. I guess I'll need to make the best use of space that I can. The before pictures will be added in the next blog, but here is the plan for now.

I've got 1 circuit in the garage. Its 20 amps, but my dust collector (DC) and benchtop planer each draw 15 each. I also got a 15 yr old beat up 8" jointer that I'd like to set up to run on 220 and who knows, maybe one day I'll get a real table saw (TS). I think I want to add a couple 20 amp circuits to what I've got and a 220 (maybe two - I need to research the feasability).

I've got 1/3 of the garage sheetrocked and insulated. The rest needs to be done since it gets really hot in summer and pretty cold in winter. This impacts the temperature in the room above the garage too though, so this needs to be done anyway. Insulating the garage door is going to be the real challenge though. I haven't liked the kits I've seen, so I'm going to try and come up with something of my own.

The last thing I'll need to do is recreate my workspace/storage area to be more efficient and pleasant to work in. I'm going to steal Todd Clippinger's sheet goods storage idea seen here. This will essentially be one side of the cabinets that I plan to build along my wall.

Unfortunately, this means the blog i did on my sheet goods storage was a waste of time.
http://lumberjocks.com/HokieMojo/blog/10536

It just takes up too much space. I still like many aspects of it, but my original plan was to move it into my wifes parking spot whenever I was going to work. then move it back to my side when I'm done. That meant full setup and breakdown time for every work session. 1 hr setup, 1 hr work, 1 hr cleanup didn't motivate me to work very often. I doubt anyone will read this whole blog, but hopefully people will see the subsequent entries (with pictures) and enjoy it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Before Pictures

In my first blog post of the series, I discussed some considerations for my garage. It didn't get a huge response, so this time, I'm posting PICTURES BELOW (-: My garage shop renovation has been underway for a couple months with me working every other weekend when time permitted. I've been trying to take occasional photos, but haven't really had a lot of time to keep up with a blog. Here is my retroactive attempt to get things up to speed. But first, here is my to do list:

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

That's quite a list, but I've already done a lot. I'll show that in future blog posts. For now, here are some BEFORE pictures. Unfortunately, these were taken when my wife and I were looking to buy our house about 6 years ago. I wasn't woodworking until two years later and all I saw the garage for was a place to fit 2 cars. As such, I didn't take a lot of pictures.

This is from the garage door looking in. You can see a door that is a small closet. It's useful for a bit of storage but doesn't have a light so I don't care much for rummaging around in there. I worry what I'll find in the dark enclosed space.


Here is the furnace/hot water heater. Nothing exciting, but in the photo you can almost see the closet I mentioned. This is also one of the one and a half walls that are already drywalled (and I assume insulated)


And here is a shot from the back of the garage looking toward the door. You can see some nice big shelves above the door. These seem nice, but I question how much weight they can hold. I know they each supported 200 lbs when I was putting in the insulation/sheetrock but I won't be putting much heavy stuff up there since i don't want it coming down on my car, no matter how little value it has. These shelves will also provide some real headaches for me when I try to drywall around the support brackets in future blog posts.


If you want a few more pictures, you can catch glimpses on another of my lumberjocks blogs by looking in the background of the photos. Basically, it is an unfinished garage. Nothing special. Hope you check out my future posts. More should be following in the next few days.
 

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118,619 Posts
Before Pictures

In my first blog post of the series, I discussed some considerations for my garage. It didn't get a huge response, so this time, I'm posting PICTURES BELOW (-: My garage shop renovation has been underway for a couple months with me working every other weekend when time permitted. I've been trying to take occasional photos, but haven't really had a lot of time to keep up with a blog. Here is my retroactive attempt to get things up to speed. But first, here is my to do list:

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

That's quite a list, but I've already done a lot. I'll show that in future blog posts. For now, here are some BEFORE pictures. Unfortunately, these were taken when my wife and I were looking to buy our house about 6 years ago. I wasn't woodworking until two years later and all I saw the garage for was a place to fit 2 cars. As such, I didn't take a lot of pictures.

This is from the garage door looking in. You can see a door that is a small closet. It's useful for a bit of storage but doesn't have a light so I don't care much for rummaging around in there. I worry what I'll find in the dark enclosed space.


Here is the furnace/hot water heater. Nothing exciting, but in the photo you can almost see the closet I mentioned. This is also one of the one and a half walls that are already drywalled (and I assume insulated)


And here is a shot from the back of the garage looking toward the door. You can see some nice big shelves above the door. These seem nice, but I question how much weight they can hold. I know they each supported 200 lbs when I was putting in the insulation/sheetrock but I won't be putting much heavy stuff up there since i don't want it coming down on my car, no matter how little value it has. These shelves will also provide some real headaches for me when I try to drywall around the support brackets in future blog posts.


If you want a few more pictures, you can catch glimpses on another of my lumberjocks blogs by looking in the background of the photos. Basically, it is an unfinished garage. Nothing special. Hope you check out my future posts. More should be following in the next few days.
A big list
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Before Pictures

In my first blog post of the series, I discussed some considerations for my garage. It didn't get a huge response, so this time, I'm posting PICTURES BELOW (-: My garage shop renovation has been underway for a couple months with me working every other weekend when time permitted. I've been trying to take occasional photos, but haven't really had a lot of time to keep up with a blog. Here is my retroactive attempt to get things up to speed. But first, here is my to do list:

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

That's quite a list, but I've already done a lot. I'll show that in future blog posts. For now, here are some BEFORE pictures. Unfortunately, these were taken when my wife and I were looking to buy our house about 6 years ago. I wasn't woodworking until two years later and all I saw the garage for was a place to fit 2 cars. As such, I didn't take a lot of pictures.

This is from the garage door looking in. You can see a door that is a small closet. It's useful for a bit of storage but doesn't have a light so I don't care much for rummaging around in there. I worry what I'll find in the dark enclosed space.


Here is the furnace/hot water heater. Nothing exciting, but in the photo you can almost see the closet I mentioned. This is also one of the one and a half walls that are already drywalled (and I assume insulated)


And here is a shot from the back of the garage looking toward the door. You can see some nice big shelves above the door. These seem nice, but I question how much weight they can hold. I know they each supported 200 lbs when I was putting in the insulation/sheetrock but I won't be putting much heavy stuff up there since i don't want it coming down on my car, no matter how little value it has. These shelves will also provide some real headaches for me when I try to drywall around the support brackets in future blog posts.


If you want a few more pictures, you can catch glimpses on another of my lumberjocks blogs by looking in the background of the photos. Basically, it is an unfinished garage. Nothing special. Hope you check out my future posts. More should be following in the next few days.
I'm about ready to start step 10 in real life so I know I can do this. I just need to see if there is interest in the blog before I take the time to blog out steps 2-9 and then continue to completion.
 

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Before Pictures

In my first blog post of the series, I discussed some considerations for my garage. It didn't get a huge response, so this time, I'm posting PICTURES BELOW (-: My garage shop renovation has been underway for a couple months with me working every other weekend when time permitted. I've been trying to take occasional photos, but haven't really had a lot of time to keep up with a blog. Here is my retroactive attempt to get things up to speed. But first, here is my to do list:

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

That's quite a list, but I've already done a lot. I'll show that in future blog posts. For now, here are some BEFORE pictures. Unfortunately, these were taken when my wife and I were looking to buy our house about 6 years ago. I wasn't woodworking until two years later and all I saw the garage for was a place to fit 2 cars. As such, I didn't take a lot of pictures.

This is from the garage door looking in. You can see a door that is a small closet. It's useful for a bit of storage but doesn't have a light so I don't care much for rummaging around in there. I worry what I'll find in the dark enclosed space.


Here is the furnace/hot water heater. Nothing exciting, but in the photo you can almost see the closet I mentioned. This is also one of the one and a half walls that are already drywalled (and I assume insulated)


And here is a shot from the back of the garage looking toward the door. You can see some nice big shelves above the door. These seem nice, but I question how much weight they can hold. I know they each supported 200 lbs when I was putting in the insulation/sheetrock but I won't be putting much heavy stuff up there since i don't want it coming down on my car, no matter how little value it has. These shelves will also provide some real headaches for me when I try to drywall around the support brackets in future blog posts.


If you want a few more pictures, you can catch glimpses on another of my lumberjocks blogs by looking in the background of the photos. Basically, it is an unfinished garage. Nothing special. Hope you check out my future posts. More should be following in the next few days.
I think that I would be concerned about the "lofts" as well. I would tie the other end of the "L" to the wall in the same fashion as the existing brace. I would also look at brace from front wall up to the "loft" running along side the garage door track.
I have a "loft" in my shop, http://lumberjocks.com/Bureaucrat/workshop . There is an eight foot run that is unsupported that I worry about. I did double up on the 2x's on the leading edge to stiffen it. I have already got a lot of stuff up there. Mostly it's bulky light stuff.
Best of luck on this build out. Keep those posts coming.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Before Pictures

In my first blog post of the series, I discussed some considerations for my garage. It didn't get a huge response, so this time, I'm posting PICTURES BELOW (-: My garage shop renovation has been underway for a couple months with me working every other weekend when time permitted. I've been trying to take occasional photos, but haven't really had a lot of time to keep up with a blog. Here is my retroactive attempt to get things up to speed. But first, here is my to do list:

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

That's quite a list, but I've already done a lot. I'll show that in future blog posts. For now, here are some BEFORE pictures. Unfortunately, these were taken when my wife and I were looking to buy our house about 6 years ago. I wasn't woodworking until two years later and all I saw the garage for was a place to fit 2 cars. As such, I didn't take a lot of pictures.

This is from the garage door looking in. You can see a door that is a small closet. It's useful for a bit of storage but doesn't have a light so I don't care much for rummaging around in there. I worry what I'll find in the dark enclosed space.


Here is the furnace/hot water heater. Nothing exciting, but in the photo you can almost see the closet I mentioned. This is also one of the one and a half walls that are already drywalled (and I assume insulated)


And here is a shot from the back of the garage looking toward the door. You can see some nice big shelves above the door. These seem nice, but I question how much weight they can hold. I know they each supported 200 lbs when I was putting in the insulation/sheetrock but I won't be putting much heavy stuff up there since i don't want it coming down on my car, no matter how little value it has. These shelves will also provide some real headaches for me when I try to drywall around the support brackets in future blog posts.


If you want a few more pictures, you can catch glimpses on another of my lumberjocks blogs by looking in the background of the photos. Basically, it is an unfinished garage. Nothing special. Hope you check out my future posts. More should be following in the next few days.
Bureaucrat
The loft does actually have 2 braces per shelf. I think my photo cut off the bracing on each side, probably by an inch. I do wish it had more support, but I'll be storing similar items (bulky but not too heavy). If I do have heavy item, I'll keep it as close to the wall as possible so it isn't hanging out far from the supported shelf.

I must say, yours looks much better than mine.
 

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Before Pictures

In my first blog post of the series, I discussed some considerations for my garage. It didn't get a huge response, so this time, I'm posting PICTURES BELOW (-: My garage shop renovation has been underway for a couple months with me working every other weekend when time permitted. I've been trying to take occasional photos, but haven't really had a lot of time to keep up with a blog. Here is my retroactive attempt to get things up to speed. But first, here is my to do list:

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

That's quite a list, but I've already done a lot. I'll show that in future blog posts. For now, here are some BEFORE pictures. Unfortunately, these were taken when my wife and I were looking to buy our house about 6 years ago. I wasn't woodworking until two years later and all I saw the garage for was a place to fit 2 cars. As such, I didn't take a lot of pictures.

This is from the garage door looking in. You can see a door that is a small closet. It's useful for a bit of storage but doesn't have a light so I don't care much for rummaging around in there. I worry what I'll find in the dark enclosed space.


Here is the furnace/hot water heater. Nothing exciting, but in the photo you can almost see the closet I mentioned. This is also one of the one and a half walls that are already drywalled (and I assume insulated)


And here is a shot from the back of the garage looking toward the door. You can see some nice big shelves above the door. These seem nice, but I question how much weight they can hold. I know they each supported 200 lbs when I was putting in the insulation/sheetrock but I won't be putting much heavy stuff up there since i don't want it coming down on my car, no matter how little value it has. These shelves will also provide some real headaches for me when I try to drywall around the support brackets in future blog posts.


If you want a few more pictures, you can catch glimpses on another of my lumberjocks blogs by looking in the background of the photos. Basically, it is an unfinished garage. Nothing special. Hope you check out my future posts. More should be following in the next few days.
To Do List! That is a great way for getting things done. For me I put a few easy ones on the list so I can cross something off now and then. Makes me fell good! Also I have been known to add something I have already done and then cross it off, making me fell like I'm getting something done.

Keep up the good work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Before Pictures

In my first blog post of the series, I discussed some considerations for my garage. It didn't get a huge response, so this time, I'm posting PICTURES BELOW (-: My garage shop renovation has been underway for a couple months with me working every other weekend when time permitted. I've been trying to take occasional photos, but haven't really had a lot of time to keep up with a blog. Here is my retroactive attempt to get things up to speed. But first, here is my to do list:

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

That's quite a list, but I've already done a lot. I'll show that in future blog posts. For now, here are some BEFORE pictures. Unfortunately, these were taken when my wife and I were looking to buy our house about 6 years ago. I wasn't woodworking until two years later and all I saw the garage for was a place to fit 2 cars. As such, I didn't take a lot of pictures.

This is from the garage door looking in. You can see a door that is a small closet. It's useful for a bit of storage but doesn't have a light so I don't care much for rummaging around in there. I worry what I'll find in the dark enclosed space.


Here is the furnace/hot water heater. Nothing exciting, but in the photo you can almost see the closet I mentioned. This is also one of the one and a half walls that are already drywalled (and I assume insulated)


And here is a shot from the back of the garage looking toward the door. You can see some nice big shelves above the door. These seem nice, but I question how much weight they can hold. I know they each supported 200 lbs when I was putting in the insulation/sheetrock but I won't be putting much heavy stuff up there since i don't want it coming down on my car, no matter how little value it has. These shelves will also provide some real headaches for me when I try to drywall around the support brackets in future blog posts.


If you want a few more pictures, you can catch glimpses on another of my lumberjocks blogs by looking in the background of the photos. Basically, it is an unfinished garage. Nothing special. Hope you check out my future posts. More should be following in the next few days.
Alexander - Stay tuned. You get a special mention in a future blog post when I get to my electrical stuff. (-:
 

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Before Pictures

In my first blog post of the series, I discussed some considerations for my garage. It didn't get a huge response, so this time, I'm posting PICTURES BELOW (-: My garage shop renovation has been underway for a couple months with me working every other weekend when time permitted. I've been trying to take occasional photos, but haven't really had a lot of time to keep up with a blog. Here is my retroactive attempt to get things up to speed. But first, here is my to do list:

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

That's quite a list, but I've already done a lot. I'll show that in future blog posts. For now, here are some BEFORE pictures. Unfortunately, these were taken when my wife and I were looking to buy our house about 6 years ago. I wasn't woodworking until two years later and all I saw the garage for was a place to fit 2 cars. As such, I didn't take a lot of pictures.

This is from the garage door looking in. You can see a door that is a small closet. It's useful for a bit of storage but doesn't have a light so I don't care much for rummaging around in there. I worry what I'll find in the dark enclosed space.


Here is the furnace/hot water heater. Nothing exciting, but in the photo you can almost see the closet I mentioned. This is also one of the one and a half walls that are already drywalled (and I assume insulated)


And here is a shot from the back of the garage looking toward the door. You can see some nice big shelves above the door. These seem nice, but I question how much weight they can hold. I know they each supported 200 lbs when I was putting in the insulation/sheetrock but I won't be putting much heavy stuff up there since i don't want it coming down on my car, no matter how little value it has. These shelves will also provide some real headaches for me when I try to drywall around the support brackets in future blog posts.


If you want a few more pictures, you can catch glimpses on another of my lumberjocks blogs by looking in the background of the photos. Basically, it is an unfinished garage. Nothing special. Hope you check out my future posts. More should be following in the next few days.
Nice list. Step back(take a break) on occasion and reassess what you have done and what has to be done, adjust as needed. Is your garage door metal or wood, if its metal consider a product called Prodex, can be ordered on line. Good luck.
 

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Before Pictures

In my first blog post of the series, I discussed some considerations for my garage. It didn't get a huge response, so this time, I'm posting PICTURES BELOW (-: My garage shop renovation has been underway for a couple months with me working every other weekend when time permitted. I've been trying to take occasional photos, but haven't really had a lot of time to keep up with a blog. Here is my retroactive attempt to get things up to speed. But first, here is my to do list:

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

That's quite a list, but I've already done a lot. I'll show that in future blog posts. For now, here are some BEFORE pictures. Unfortunately, these were taken when my wife and I were looking to buy our house about 6 years ago. I wasn't woodworking until two years later and all I saw the garage for was a place to fit 2 cars. As such, I didn't take a lot of pictures.

This is from the garage door looking in. You can see a door that is a small closet. It's useful for a bit of storage but doesn't have a light so I don't care much for rummaging around in there. I worry what I'll find in the dark enclosed space.


Here is the furnace/hot water heater. Nothing exciting, but in the photo you can almost see the closet I mentioned. This is also one of the one and a half walls that are already drywalled (and I assume insulated)


And here is a shot from the back of the garage looking toward the door. You can see some nice big shelves above the door. These seem nice, but I question how much weight they can hold. I know they each supported 200 lbs when I was putting in the insulation/sheetrock but I won't be putting much heavy stuff up there since i don't want it coming down on my car, no matter how little value it has. These shelves will also provide some real headaches for me when I try to drywall around the support brackets in future blog posts.


If you want a few more pictures, you can catch glimpses on another of my lumberjocks blogs by looking in the background of the photos. Basically, it is an unfinished garage. Nothing special. Hope you check out my future posts. More should be following in the next few days.
I think you should consider the possibility of that closet as a new home to a dust collector and/or air compressor - it would be nice to wall off those two noisy machines if possible (I wish I had provided for that when I built my workshop last summer).

James
 

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8,740 Posts
Before Pictures

In my first blog post of the series, I discussed some considerations for my garage. It didn't get a huge response, so this time, I'm posting PICTURES BELOW (-: My garage shop renovation has been underway for a couple months with me working every other weekend when time permitted. I've been trying to take occasional photos, but haven't really had a lot of time to keep up with a blog. Here is my retroactive attempt to get things up to speed. But first, here is my to do list:

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

That's quite a list, but I've already done a lot. I'll show that in future blog posts. For now, here are some BEFORE pictures. Unfortunately, these were taken when my wife and I were looking to buy our house about 6 years ago. I wasn't woodworking until two years later and all I saw the garage for was a place to fit 2 cars. As such, I didn't take a lot of pictures.

This is from the garage door looking in. You can see a door that is a small closet. It's useful for a bit of storage but doesn't have a light so I don't care much for rummaging around in there. I worry what I'll find in the dark enclosed space.


Here is the furnace/hot water heater. Nothing exciting, but in the photo you can almost see the closet I mentioned. This is also one of the one and a half walls that are already drywalled (and I assume insulated)


And here is a shot from the back of the garage looking toward the door. You can see some nice big shelves above the door. These seem nice, but I question how much weight they can hold. I know they each supported 200 lbs when I was putting in the insulation/sheetrock but I won't be putting much heavy stuff up there since i don't want it coming down on my car, no matter how little value it has. These shelves will also provide some real headaches for me when I try to drywall around the support brackets in future blog posts.


If you want a few more pictures, you can catch glimpses on another of my lumberjocks blogs by looking in the background of the photos. Basically, it is an unfinished garage. Nothing special. Hope you check out my future posts. More should be following in the next few days.
this is cool. so much potential! looking forward to seeing this progress. that closet looks like a good candidate to host a DC in there - keep the noise down, and add another filtration layer to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Before Pictures

In my first blog post of the series, I discussed some considerations for my garage. It didn't get a huge response, so this time, I'm posting PICTURES BELOW (-: My garage shop renovation has been underway for a couple months with me working every other weekend when time permitted. I've been trying to take occasional photos, but haven't really had a lot of time to keep up with a blog. Here is my retroactive attempt to get things up to speed. But first, here is my to do list:

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

That's quite a list, but I've already done a lot. I'll show that in future blog posts. For now, here are some BEFORE pictures. Unfortunately, these were taken when my wife and I were looking to buy our house about 6 years ago. I wasn't woodworking until two years later and all I saw the garage for was a place to fit 2 cars. As such, I didn't take a lot of pictures.

This is from the garage door looking in. You can see a door that is a small closet. It's useful for a bit of storage but doesn't have a light so I don't care much for rummaging around in there. I worry what I'll find in the dark enclosed space.


Here is the furnace/hot water heater. Nothing exciting, but in the photo you can almost see the closet I mentioned. This is also one of the one and a half walls that are already drywalled (and I assume insulated)


And here is a shot from the back of the garage looking toward the door. You can see some nice big shelves above the door. These seem nice, but I question how much weight they can hold. I know they each supported 200 lbs when I was putting in the insulation/sheetrock but I won't be putting much heavy stuff up there since i don't want it coming down on my car, no matter how little value it has. These shelves will also provide some real headaches for me when I try to drywall around the support brackets in future blog posts.


If you want a few more pictures, you can catch glimpses on another of my lumberjocks blogs by looking in the background of the photos. Basically, it is an unfinished garage. Nothing special. Hope you check out my future posts. More should be following in the next few days.
Thanks for the comments guys. Good to know there is some interest in my renovation blog. I hope that I have enough photos. I'm having trouble getting some pictures off of my camera. I'm resorting to some image recovery software that I've had luck with in the past. Hopefully the next blog will be up in the next day or so.

workerinwood - The door is wood, but I thought about adding insulation anyway. So far, I seem to have much better temperature regulation just from having the walls done. I'll revisit solutions for the door if it gets too unbearable when the daytime high's start hitting the upper 90's- to low 100's. As long as it stays reasonable till about 1:00 each day, I''ll probably forgo insulating the door until I replace the door altogether.

James and Purp - I've thought about housing my DC unit in there, but I think for my family's sake, I'm going to have to figure out an alternative. The back of the closet shares a wall with the family room. It also has a bunch of the duct work that connects the air handler to the air intake as well as a few floor vents in the house. I'm sure there is a way to work around these issues, but I think the soundproofing could be tricky.

One alternative idea I had was to build a walled in area next to the water heater. There would also maybe be a wall to enclose the furnace/water heats themselves. In this picture, the units look quite clean, but now, they've got substantial dust on them. I worry I'm contributing to their early demise. I try to keep them clean, but if dust gets on moving parts, there isn't much I can do to clean that. I'd have a lot of thinking to do if I were to attempt that.
 

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Before Pictures

In my first blog post of the series, I discussed some considerations for my garage. It didn't get a huge response, so this time, I'm posting PICTURES BELOW (-: My garage shop renovation has been underway for a couple months with me working every other weekend when time permitted. I've been trying to take occasional photos, but haven't really had a lot of time to keep up with a blog. Here is my retroactive attempt to get things up to speed. But first, here is my to do list:

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

That's quite a list, but I've already done a lot. I'll show that in future blog posts. For now, here are some BEFORE pictures. Unfortunately, these were taken when my wife and I were looking to buy our house about 6 years ago. I wasn't woodworking until two years later and all I saw the garage for was a place to fit 2 cars. As such, I didn't take a lot of pictures.

This is from the garage door looking in. You can see a door that is a small closet. It's useful for a bit of storage but doesn't have a light so I don't care much for rummaging around in there. I worry what I'll find in the dark enclosed space.


Here is the furnace/hot water heater. Nothing exciting, but in the photo you can almost see the closet I mentioned. This is also one of the one and a half walls that are already drywalled (and I assume insulated)


And here is a shot from the back of the garage looking toward the door. You can see some nice big shelves above the door. These seem nice, but I question how much weight they can hold. I know they each supported 200 lbs when I was putting in the insulation/sheetrock but I won't be putting much heavy stuff up there since i don't want it coming down on my car, no matter how little value it has. These shelves will also provide some real headaches for me when I try to drywall around the support brackets in future blog posts.


If you want a few more pictures, you can catch glimpses on another of my lumberjocks blogs by looking in the background of the photos. Basically, it is an unfinished garage. Nothing special. Hope you check out my future posts. More should be following in the next few days.
A suggestion on #6: Use OSB plywood on the walls instead of drywall, that way you can hang tools and stuff anywheres in the shop. Drywall is not strong enough to hold heavy items unless you find the studs. I did this in my workshop and painted the OSB to brighten the room and hanging things is a snap.

Erwin Jacksonville,FL
 
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Before Pictures

In my first blog post of the series, I discussed some considerations for my garage. It didn't get a huge response, so this time, I'm posting PICTURES BELOW (-: My garage shop renovation has been underway for a couple months with me working every other weekend when time permitted. I've been trying to take occasional photos, but haven't really had a lot of time to keep up with a blog. Here is my retroactive attempt to get things up to speed. But first, here is my to do list:

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

That's quite a list, but I've already done a lot. I'll show that in future blog posts. For now, here are some BEFORE pictures. Unfortunately, these were taken when my wife and I were looking to buy our house about 6 years ago. I wasn't woodworking until two years later and all I saw the garage for was a place to fit 2 cars. As such, I didn't take a lot of pictures.

This is from the garage door looking in. You can see a door that is a small closet. It's useful for a bit of storage but doesn't have a light so I don't care much for rummaging around in there. I worry what I'll find in the dark enclosed space.


Here is the furnace/hot water heater. Nothing exciting, but in the photo you can almost see the closet I mentioned. This is also one of the one and a half walls that are already drywalled (and I assume insulated)


And here is a shot from the back of the garage looking toward the door. You can see some nice big shelves above the door. These seem nice, but I question how much weight they can hold. I know they each supported 200 lbs when I was putting in the insulation/sheetrock but I won't be putting much heavy stuff up there since i don't want it coming down on my car, no matter how little value it has. These shelves will also provide some real headaches for me when I try to drywall around the support brackets in future blog posts.


If you want a few more pictures, you can catch glimpses on another of my lumberjocks blogs by looking in the background of the photos. Basically, it is an unfinished garage. Nothing special. Hope you check out my future posts. More should be following in the next few days.
Thats a big list to complete.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Before Pictures

In my first blog post of the series, I discussed some considerations for my garage. It didn't get a huge response, so this time, I'm posting PICTURES BELOW (-: My garage shop renovation has been underway for a couple months with me working every other weekend when time permitted. I've been trying to take occasional photos, but haven't really had a lot of time to keep up with a blog. Here is my retroactive attempt to get things up to speed. But first, here is my to do list:

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

That's quite a list, but I've already done a lot. I'll show that in future blog posts. For now, here are some BEFORE pictures. Unfortunately, these were taken when my wife and I were looking to buy our house about 6 years ago. I wasn't woodworking until two years later and all I saw the garage for was a place to fit 2 cars. As such, I didn't take a lot of pictures.

This is from the garage door looking in. You can see a door that is a small closet. It's useful for a bit of storage but doesn't have a light so I don't care much for rummaging around in there. I worry what I'll find in the dark enclosed space.


Here is the furnace/hot water heater. Nothing exciting, but in the photo you can almost see the closet I mentioned. This is also one of the one and a half walls that are already drywalled (and I assume insulated)


And here is a shot from the back of the garage looking toward the door. You can see some nice big shelves above the door. These seem nice, but I question how much weight they can hold. I know they each supported 200 lbs when I was putting in the insulation/sheetrock but I won't be putting much heavy stuff up there since i don't want it coming down on my car, no matter how little value it has. These shelves will also provide some real headaches for me when I try to drywall around the support brackets in future blog posts.


If you want a few more pictures, you can catch glimpses on another of my lumberjocks blogs by looking in the background of the photos. Basically, it is an unfinished garage. Nothing special. Hope you check out my future posts. More should be following in the next few days.
It is CJ, but I'm slowly getting there. Probably 1/2 way by now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Wiring is mostly complete!

DISCLAIMER:
I did all my work with the wiring while it was not hooked up to any power sources. One I got to that point, I stopped and let a pro review my work, fix my mistakes and do any of the dangerous work like hooking it up to power. Mistakes might be in this blog, so don't take this as a how to. I'm just documenting my understanding of the process so you can see the progress. Consult with a professional to do any of your own work!

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

I'll start off by saying I lost some photos, but I still have some good pictures to show you in this post. Just bear with me.

Also, I'd like to extend a special thanks to Alexander for his help getting me educated on the purchases I was about to make. It is a huge help when you know what you are talking about when speaking to the pros. They might not know woodworking so communicating your needs (and knowing what those are) is important. Thanks!

I moved all my stuff to the center of the garage. It gave me a whopping 3-4 ft of space all around the edg of the garage to install wiring. The flaw with this plan was that I learned on the job that I needed a lot more tools than I originally thought. Those tools were inevitably buried in the center most portion of the pile. Ahh, the fun.

As you might have seen in my last blog, the electrical box is in the back left corner of the garage. I needed add outlets to the front left corner, back up and over the garage door to the front right corner, and another pair of outlets to the middle right wall. At the middle right wall, there will also be a 240volt outlet to power my jointer and maybe a tablesaw in the future. Here is what the outlets each look like:
240 volt:


120 volt - This was the hardest part of the entire job. It was almost IMPOSSIBLE to get these THICK wires tucked back into the box. Just a warning in case anyone wants to use 10 gauge wire. If I were an electrician, I'd charge double for this.:


In total I'll have three circuits at each corner of my workspace:


For each of these outlets, I used 10/3 wire. That is some really tough stuff to run. It might not be to bad to run it in a straight line, but when you need to zig zag around an I beam, the occasional exterior sheathing nail that is buried in the 2×4's, or shelving supports, it does make it a lot tougher to pull the wire. I did go with the heavier gauge because of the length of the run, the capacity to run large tools, and the ability to use it for my 240v outlet.

Here is a comparison of 14/2 (white) wire and 10/3 (orange). It probably doesn't look like much, but it makes a HUGE difference when trying to feed the wire:


After doing the rough wiring, it was time to get the sub-panel in. This was a job for someone who knew what they were doing, but I did know what I wanted. I went with a 100 amp sub panel. It is fed by 2/2/2/4 wire. I order the material and asked for a 6 foot length so that it would reach from adjacent spaces in the wall. Thankfully they actually gave me about 9 feet because I used almost all of it.

Here is a photo of the new box being installed:


If you are curious about the difference between 10/3 and the 2/2/2/4 (insulated sheathing was removed. The wire is actually all four wires in one), here is a photo. The wire is literally solid copper a little thicker than a garden hose!


The remaining things to be done are to add four 4-bulb T8 light fixtures. I'm going to do this by running conduit along the ceiling and calling a pro back. I will be getting a new heating/air handler system for the house so I'll keep the blower and build an air filtration box (I think this will require a 240 circuit). I want to add another 240 volt circuit in case I ever get any more big tools (I'm planning ahead by about 30 yrs) Finally (unrelated to shop use) we want to get a chest freezer so I'm going to need to add one more outlet for that. I need to get a pro back out here soon! (-:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Wiring is mostly complete!

DISCLAIMER:
I did all my work with the wiring while it was not hooked up to any power sources. One I got to that point, I stopped and let a pro review my work, fix my mistakes and do any of the dangerous work like hooking it up to power. Mistakes might be in this blog, so don't take this as a how to. I'm just documenting my understanding of the process so you can see the progress. Consult with a professional to do any of your own work!

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

I'll start off by saying I lost some photos, but I still have some good pictures to show you in this post. Just bear with me.

Also, I'd like to extend a special thanks to Alexander for his help getting me educated on the purchases I was about to make. It is a huge help when you know what you are talking about when speaking to the pros. They might not know woodworking so communicating your needs (and knowing what those are) is important. Thanks!

I moved all my stuff to the center of the garage. It gave me a whopping 3-4 ft of space all around the edg of the garage to install wiring. The flaw with this plan was that I learned on the job that I needed a lot more tools than I originally thought. Those tools were inevitably buried in the center most portion of the pile. Ahh, the fun.

As you might have seen in my last blog, the electrical box is in the back left corner of the garage. I needed add outlets to the front left corner, back up and over the garage door to the front right corner, and another pair of outlets to the middle right wall. At the middle right wall, there will also be a 240volt outlet to power my jointer and maybe a tablesaw in the future. Here is what the outlets each look like:
240 volt:


120 volt - This was the hardest part of the entire job. It was almost IMPOSSIBLE to get these THICK wires tucked back into the box. Just a warning in case anyone wants to use 10 gauge wire. If I were an electrician, I'd charge double for this.:


In total I'll have three circuits at each corner of my workspace:


For each of these outlets, I used 10/3 wire. That is some really tough stuff to run. It might not be to bad to run it in a straight line, but when you need to zig zag around an I beam, the occasional exterior sheathing nail that is buried in the 2×4's, or shelving supports, it does make it a lot tougher to pull the wire. I did go with the heavier gauge because of the length of the run, the capacity to run large tools, and the ability to use it for my 240v outlet.

Here is a comparison of 14/2 (white) wire and 10/3 (orange). It probably doesn't look like much, but it makes a HUGE difference when trying to feed the wire:


After doing the rough wiring, it was time to get the sub-panel in. This was a job for someone who knew what they were doing, but I did know what I wanted. I went with a 100 amp sub panel. It is fed by 2/2/2/4 wire. I order the material and asked for a 6 foot length so that it would reach from adjacent spaces in the wall. Thankfully they actually gave me about 9 feet because I used almost all of it.

Here is a photo of the new box being installed:


If you are curious about the difference between 10/3 and the 2/2/2/4 (insulated sheathing was removed. The wire is actually all four wires in one), here is a photo. The wire is literally solid copper a little thicker than a garden hose!


The remaining things to be done are to add four 4-bulb T8 light fixtures. I'm going to do this by running conduit along the ceiling and calling a pro back. I will be getting a new heating/air handler system for the house so I'll keep the blower and build an air filtration box (I think this will require a 240 circuit). I want to add another 240 volt circuit in case I ever get any more big tools (I'm planning ahead by about 30 yrs) Finally (unrelated to shop use) we want to get a chest freezer so I'm going to need to add one more outlet for that. I need to get a pro back out here soon! (-:
Oh, and I realize my drywall holes are pretty bad. I'll leave that for the next post… insulation and drywall.
 

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Wiring is mostly complete!

DISCLAIMER:
I did all my work with the wiring while it was not hooked up to any power sources. One I got to that point, I stopped and let a pro review my work, fix my mistakes and do any of the dangerous work like hooking it up to power. Mistakes might be in this blog, so don't take this as a how to. I'm just documenting my understanding of the process so you can see the progress. Consult with a professional to do any of your own work!

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

I'll start off by saying I lost some photos, but I still have some good pictures to show you in this post. Just bear with me.

Also, I'd like to extend a special thanks to Alexander for his help getting me educated on the purchases I was about to make. It is a huge help when you know what you are talking about when speaking to the pros. They might not know woodworking so communicating your needs (and knowing what those are) is important. Thanks!

I moved all my stuff to the center of the garage. It gave me a whopping 3-4 ft of space all around the edg of the garage to install wiring. The flaw with this plan was that I learned on the job that I needed a lot more tools than I originally thought. Those tools were inevitably buried in the center most portion of the pile. Ahh, the fun.

As you might have seen in my last blog, the electrical box is in the back left corner of the garage. I needed add outlets to the front left corner, back up and over the garage door to the front right corner, and another pair of outlets to the middle right wall. At the middle right wall, there will also be a 240volt outlet to power my jointer and maybe a tablesaw in the future. Here is what the outlets each look like:
240 volt:


120 volt - This was the hardest part of the entire job. It was almost IMPOSSIBLE to get these THICK wires tucked back into the box. Just a warning in case anyone wants to use 10 gauge wire. If I were an electrician, I'd charge double for this.:


In total I'll have three circuits at each corner of my workspace:


For each of these outlets, I used 10/3 wire. That is some really tough stuff to run. It might not be to bad to run it in a straight line, but when you need to zig zag around an I beam, the occasional exterior sheathing nail that is buried in the 2×4's, or shelving supports, it does make it a lot tougher to pull the wire. I did go with the heavier gauge because of the length of the run, the capacity to run large tools, and the ability to use it for my 240v outlet.

Here is a comparison of 14/2 (white) wire and 10/3 (orange). It probably doesn't look like much, but it makes a HUGE difference when trying to feed the wire:


After doing the rough wiring, it was time to get the sub-panel in. This was a job for someone who knew what they were doing, but I did know what I wanted. I went with a 100 amp sub panel. It is fed by 2/2/2/4 wire. I order the material and asked for a 6 foot length so that it would reach from adjacent spaces in the wall. Thankfully they actually gave me about 9 feet because I used almost all of it.

Here is a photo of the new box being installed:


If you are curious about the difference between 10/3 and the 2/2/2/4 (insulated sheathing was removed. The wire is actually all four wires in one), here is a photo. The wire is literally solid copper a little thicker than a garden hose!


The remaining things to be done are to add four 4-bulb T8 light fixtures. I'm going to do this by running conduit along the ceiling and calling a pro back. I will be getting a new heating/air handler system for the house so I'll keep the blower and build an air filtration box (I think this will require a 240 circuit). I want to add another 240 volt circuit in case I ever get any more big tools (I'm planning ahead by about 30 yrs) Finally (unrelated to shop use) we want to get a chest freezer so I'm going to need to add one more outlet for that. I need to get a pro back out here soon! (-:
Wow, you are prepared for major equipment with that wiring. I did my garage shop in 12/3 but I don't have any 220 out there. It is amazing how quickly that wire gets unmanageable. I used #6 wire once, decades ago, but I had to buy a bunch extra because I couldn't make a right angle with it. Had to make this slow curve. Don't ever want to work with it again.
 

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Wiring is mostly complete!

DISCLAIMER:
I did all my work with the wiring while it was not hooked up to any power sources. One I got to that point, I stopped and let a pro review my work, fix my mistakes and do any of the dangerous work like hooking it up to power. Mistakes might be in this blog, so don't take this as a how to. I'm just documenting my understanding of the process so you can see the progress. Consult with a professional to do any of your own work!

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

I'll start off by saying I lost some photos, but I still have some good pictures to show you in this post. Just bear with me.

Also, I'd like to extend a special thanks to Alexander for his help getting me educated on the purchases I was about to make. It is a huge help when you know what you are talking about when speaking to the pros. They might not know woodworking so communicating your needs (and knowing what those are) is important. Thanks!

I moved all my stuff to the center of the garage. It gave me a whopping 3-4 ft of space all around the edg of the garage to install wiring. The flaw with this plan was that I learned on the job that I needed a lot more tools than I originally thought. Those tools were inevitably buried in the center most portion of the pile. Ahh, the fun.

As you might have seen in my last blog, the electrical box is in the back left corner of the garage. I needed add outlets to the front left corner, back up and over the garage door to the front right corner, and another pair of outlets to the middle right wall. At the middle right wall, there will also be a 240volt outlet to power my jointer and maybe a tablesaw in the future. Here is what the outlets each look like:
240 volt:


120 volt - This was the hardest part of the entire job. It was almost IMPOSSIBLE to get these THICK wires tucked back into the box. Just a warning in case anyone wants to use 10 gauge wire. If I were an electrician, I'd charge double for this.:


In total I'll have three circuits at each corner of my workspace:


For each of these outlets, I used 10/3 wire. That is some really tough stuff to run. It might not be to bad to run it in a straight line, but when you need to zig zag around an I beam, the occasional exterior sheathing nail that is buried in the 2×4's, or shelving supports, it does make it a lot tougher to pull the wire. I did go with the heavier gauge because of the length of the run, the capacity to run large tools, and the ability to use it for my 240v outlet.

Here is a comparison of 14/2 (white) wire and 10/3 (orange). It probably doesn't look like much, but it makes a HUGE difference when trying to feed the wire:


After doing the rough wiring, it was time to get the sub-panel in. This was a job for someone who knew what they were doing, but I did know what I wanted. I went with a 100 amp sub panel. It is fed by 2/2/2/4 wire. I order the material and asked for a 6 foot length so that it would reach from adjacent spaces in the wall. Thankfully they actually gave me about 9 feet because I used almost all of it.

Here is a photo of the new box being installed:


If you are curious about the difference between 10/3 and the 2/2/2/4 (insulated sheathing was removed. The wire is actually all four wires in one), here is a photo. The wire is literally solid copper a little thicker than a garden hose!


The remaining things to be done are to add four 4-bulb T8 light fixtures. I'm going to do this by running conduit along the ceiling and calling a pro back. I will be getting a new heating/air handler system for the house so I'll keep the blower and build an air filtration box (I think this will require a 240 circuit). I want to add another 240 volt circuit in case I ever get any more big tools (I'm planning ahead by about 30 yrs) Finally (unrelated to shop use) we want to get a chest freezer so I'm going to need to add one more outlet for that. I need to get a pro back out here soon! (-:
Good progress
 

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Wiring is mostly complete!

DISCLAIMER:
I did all my work with the wiring while it was not hooked up to any power sources. One I got to that point, I stopped and let a pro review my work, fix my mistakes and do any of the dangerous work like hooking it up to power. Mistakes might be in this blog, so don't take this as a how to. I'm just documenting my understanding of the process so you can see the progress. Consult with a professional to do any of your own work!

To Do (bold items are complete as of this blog posting):

1) Clean up and trash unused items/unusable scrap
2) Consolidate everything in the center of the garage
3) Rough in wiring and electrical
4) Get a sub-panel installed
5) Fiberglass insulation
6) Drywall and Mudding
7) Repeat step One
8) Prime (and maybe paint)
9) Install Fire Extinguisher
10) Add T8 light fixtures
11) Reattach hanging items that will be reused
12) Build a more substantial wall mounted lumber rack
13) Complete and re-purpose my mobile lumber rack/sheet goods storage
14) Take a hiatus from woodworking to hang out with the family
15) Build some small projects for gifts
16) Build shop cabinets, router table, workbench, miter station, etc.

I'll start off by saying I lost some photos, but I still have some good pictures to show you in this post. Just bear with me.

Also, I'd like to extend a special thanks to Alexander for his help getting me educated on the purchases I was about to make. It is a huge help when you know what you are talking about when speaking to the pros. They might not know woodworking so communicating your needs (and knowing what those are) is important. Thanks!

I moved all my stuff to the center of the garage. It gave me a whopping 3-4 ft of space all around the edg of the garage to install wiring. The flaw with this plan was that I learned on the job that I needed a lot more tools than I originally thought. Those tools were inevitably buried in the center most portion of the pile. Ahh, the fun.

As you might have seen in my last blog, the electrical box is in the back left corner of the garage. I needed add outlets to the front left corner, back up and over the garage door to the front right corner, and another pair of outlets to the middle right wall. At the middle right wall, there will also be a 240volt outlet to power my jointer and maybe a tablesaw in the future. Here is what the outlets each look like:
240 volt:


120 volt - This was the hardest part of the entire job. It was almost IMPOSSIBLE to get these THICK wires tucked back into the box. Just a warning in case anyone wants to use 10 gauge wire. If I were an electrician, I'd charge double for this.:


In total I'll have three circuits at each corner of my workspace:


For each of these outlets, I used 10/3 wire. That is some really tough stuff to run. It might not be to bad to run it in a straight line, but when you need to zig zag around an I beam, the occasional exterior sheathing nail that is buried in the 2×4's, or shelving supports, it does make it a lot tougher to pull the wire. I did go with the heavier gauge because of the length of the run, the capacity to run large tools, and the ability to use it for my 240v outlet.

Here is a comparison of 14/2 (white) wire and 10/3 (orange). It probably doesn't look like much, but it makes a HUGE difference when trying to feed the wire:


After doing the rough wiring, it was time to get the sub-panel in. This was a job for someone who knew what they were doing, but I did know what I wanted. I went with a 100 amp sub panel. It is fed by 2/2/2/4 wire. I order the material and asked for a 6 foot length so that it would reach from adjacent spaces in the wall. Thankfully they actually gave me about 9 feet because I used almost all of it.

Here is a photo of the new box being installed:


If you are curious about the difference between 10/3 and the 2/2/2/4 (insulated sheathing was removed. The wire is actually all four wires in one), here is a photo. The wire is literally solid copper a little thicker than a garden hose!


The remaining things to be done are to add four 4-bulb T8 light fixtures. I'm going to do this by running conduit along the ceiling and calling a pro back. I will be getting a new heating/air handler system for the house so I'll keep the blower and build an air filtration box (I think this will require a 240 circuit). I want to add another 240 volt circuit in case I ever get any more big tools (I'm planning ahead by about 30 yrs) Finally (unrelated to shop use) we want to get a chest freezer so I'm going to need to add one more outlet for that. I need to get a pro back out here soon! (-:
Best reference for this kind of work before you call in the pro for help for me has been the Home Depot how to do it. Worth every penny.
 
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