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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Assembly Table - Design

Filling the time waiting for the new building shopping for machinery and designing shop furniture. First up: an assembly table. Okay, actually it was an outfeed table, but that is really pretty simple. A good learning exercise for Fusion 360, though. The table and Fusion 360 may be the subject of a future post.

My assembly table is hardly unique. Seriously, how many ways can you build a table. That said, every design needs to start with some requirements.

Features

  • Lots of room. Top will be approximately 4'x8'.

  • Dead flat top. Torsion box is the winner here. 1/2" plywood bottom skin, 3/4" top skin and 1/4" hardboard sacrificial top.

  • Mobile. About the only things in the shop that won't have wheels will be a desk/worktable and the miter saw station.

  • Adjustable height. Powered. Read on.

Actuator Selection

There are probably as many ways to adjust the height of an assembly table as there are adjustable height tables. Well, maybe not quite that many. Probably the most frequently used method involves using scissor jacks, though why most use car jacks is lost on me. RV stabilizer jacks are scissors with a flat top for welding to trailer frames - no awkward vehicle interface to deal with. Some implement some variation of linear actuator. I'm opting to use an actual linear actuator.

So many choices. Capacity is all over the map, but it's a relatively easy choice; pick the highest capacity that fits in the budget. Basically, the actuator need to be able to lift the top and optionally whatever might be on it. Since I have to be able to move assemblies afterward, a 300# lift capacity should be sufficient and fit in the budget.

The major choice is throw length. Too short and the table won't get tall enough. Too long results in a table won't get low enough. So I loaded a spreadsheet with data on each length to generate the minimum and maximum height. A 12" throw resulted in a minimum of about 26.5" and a maximum of 38.25". That seems to be the sweet spot in range.

Leg Design

A single actuator won't hold the table steady. Four could, but there's a problem. Lacking a servo control system, there is no way to ensure they will move in unison or stop at the same point. So, borrowing from another design, I plan on a scheme of fixed legs attached to the top fitting into a box attached to the base. This is a draft section at minimum and maximum:

Rectangle Slope Parallel Font Diagram


Also borrowing from yet another design, I plan to include a pin to lock the legs at the selected height with a 2" interval.

The remaining question is: will the 7" overlap be sufficient for stability?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Outfeed Table - Design

In 40 years of writing code, I've applied the practice of "build one to throw it away" an extraordinary number of times. It works because you learn a great deal about the problem as you build that first version. If you do it right, the second version is much cleaner code. This week I applied the same principle to a Fusion 360 design.

As I was attempting to create drawings for the outfeed table, I discovered a few things that really needed to be changed. Back in the design workspace, all attempts to apply the changes met with multiple warnings. And attempts to debug the warnings were thwarted. It seems I created a nest of nasty interdependencies. I reached the conclusion that, if I wanted a clean model, I would need to start over. So I did.

As I said, the goal of "build one to throw it away" is to create an improved result. The new version is, indeed, better. The new version:
  • Fully parametric. Changing one or more parameters results in a correct model with the changes applied.
  • Shorter timeline with no warnings. Fewer steps means there are fewer places for errors and warning to creep in.
  • Only two "Capture Position" steps. The first version had a lot and I suspect that was the root of my problem.
  • Additional features. I added models for leveling feet and workbench casters which will now show up in the parts list.

And the result:
Table Furniture Wood Rectangle Drawer


Features
  • 4' x 7' x 34" overall. I plan to get a Grizzly 1023RLX table saw. And it can be an auxiliary assembly table.
  • Extended overhang to accommodate dust collection to the cabinet.
  • Casters so I can move it out of the way and park the truck when we have hurricanes.
  • The top is two 3/4" plywood sheets trimmed with poplar.
  • Open shelves for lumber and/or table saw jigs. One or more bays may have drawers added later.

I'm not sure how much further I want to go. I'm considering adding in the fasteners, mostly because I can. I don't plan on modeling the miter grooves since they are totally dependent on the actual table saw. I do need to set up dimensioned 2D drawings which is another adventure in Fusion 360. Part of the fun is creating A sheets and having room left for drawing after the title block. If there is interest, I'll figure out how to make the drawings available.

I know I said I was working on the adjustable height assembly table and, actually, I have. The legs, torsion box top and frame are 90% complete. Of course the first 90% takes 90% of the time, the remaining 10% takes the other 90% of the time. Anyway, it looks like I'll need to acquire the linear actuator and reverse engineer a model to finish.
 

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Outfeed Table - Design

In 40 years of writing code, I've applied the practice of "build one to throw it away" an extraordinary number of times. It works because you learn a great deal about the problem as you build that first version. If you do it right, the second version is much cleaner code. This week I applied the same principle to a Fusion 360 design.

As I was attempting to create drawings for the outfeed table, I discovered a few things that really needed to be changed. Back in the design workspace, all attempts to apply the changes met with multiple warnings. And attempts to debug the warnings were thwarted. It seems I created a nest of nasty interdependencies. I reached the conclusion that, if I wanted a clean model, I would need to start over. So I did.

As I said, the goal of "build one to throw it away" is to create an improved result. The new version is, indeed, better. The new version:
  • Fully parametric. Changing one or more parameters results in a correct model with the changes applied.
  • Shorter timeline with no warnings. Fewer steps means there are fewer places for errors and warning to creep in.
  • Only two "Capture Position" steps. The first version had a lot and I suspect that was the root of my problem.
  • Additional features. I added models for leveling feet and workbench casters which will now show up in the parts list.

And the result:
Table Furniture Wood Rectangle Drawer


Features
  • 4' x 7' x 34" overall. I plan to get a Grizzly 1023RLX table saw. And it can be an auxiliary assembly table.
  • Extended overhang to accommodate dust collection to the cabinet.
  • Casters so I can move it out of the way and park the truck when we have hurricanes.
  • The top is two 3/4" plywood sheets trimmed with poplar.
  • Open shelves for lumber and/or table saw jigs. One or more bays may have drawers added later.

I'm not sure how much further I want to go. I'm considering adding in the fasteners, mostly because I can. I don't plan on modeling the miter grooves since they are totally dependent on the actual table saw. I do need to set up dimensioned 2D drawings which is another adventure in Fusion 360. Part of the fun is creating A sheets and having room left for drawing after the title block. If there is interest, I'll figure out how to make the drawings available.

I know I said I was working on the adjustable height assembly table and, actually, I have. The legs, torsion box top and frame are 90% complete. Of course the first 90% takes 90% of the time, the remaining 10% takes the other 90% of the time. Anyway, it looks like I'll need to acquire the linear actuator and reverse engineer a model to finish.
Good looking plan, but understood very little of the process you went through to get there! ;-)
 

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Outfeed Table - Design

In 40 years of writing code, I've applied the practice of "build one to throw it away" an extraordinary number of times. It works because you learn a great deal about the problem as you build that first version. If you do it right, the second version is much cleaner code. This week I applied the same principle to a Fusion 360 design.

As I was attempting to create drawings for the outfeed table, I discovered a few things that really needed to be changed. Back in the design workspace, all attempts to apply the changes met with multiple warnings. And attempts to debug the warnings were thwarted. It seems I created a nest of nasty interdependencies. I reached the conclusion that, if I wanted a clean model, I would need to start over. So I did.

As I said, the goal of "build one to throw it away" is to create an improved result. The new version is, indeed, better. The new version:
  • Fully parametric. Changing one or more parameters results in a correct model with the changes applied.
  • Shorter timeline with no warnings. Fewer steps means there are fewer places for errors and warning to creep in.
  • Only two "Capture Position" steps. The first version had a lot and I suspect that was the root of my problem.
  • Additional features. I added models for leveling feet and workbench casters which will now show up in the parts list.

And the result:
Table Furniture Wood Rectangle Drawer


Features
  • 4' x 7' x 34" overall. I plan to get a Grizzly 1023RLX table saw. And it can be an auxiliary assembly table.
  • Extended overhang to accommodate dust collection to the cabinet.
  • Casters so I can move it out of the way and park the truck when we have hurricanes.
  • The top is two 3/4" plywood sheets trimmed with poplar.
  • Open shelves for lumber and/or table saw jigs. One or more bays may have drawers added later.

I'm not sure how much further I want to go. I'm considering adding in the fasteners, mostly because I can. I don't plan on modeling the miter grooves since they are totally dependent on the actual table saw. I do need to set up dimensioned 2D drawings which is another adventure in Fusion 360. Part of the fun is creating A sheets and having room left for drawing after the title block. If there is interest, I'll figure out how to make the drawings available.

I know I said I was working on the adjustable height assembly table and, actually, I have. The legs, torsion box top and frame are 90% complete. Of course the first 90% takes 90% of the time, the remaining 10% takes the other 90% of the time. Anyway, it looks like I'll need to acquire the linear actuator and reverse engineer a model to finish.
Interesting. Have fun on the actual build.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Outfeed Table - Design

In 40 years of writing code, I've applied the practice of "build one to throw it away" an extraordinary number of times. It works because you learn a great deal about the problem as you build that first version. If you do it right, the second version is much cleaner code. This week I applied the same principle to a Fusion 360 design.

As I was attempting to create drawings for the outfeed table, I discovered a few things that really needed to be changed. Back in the design workspace, all attempts to apply the changes met with multiple warnings. And attempts to debug the warnings were thwarted. It seems I created a nest of nasty interdependencies. I reached the conclusion that, if I wanted a clean model, I would need to start over. So I did.

As I said, the goal of "build one to throw it away" is to create an improved result. The new version is, indeed, better. The new version:
  • Fully parametric. Changing one or more parameters results in a correct model with the changes applied.
  • Shorter timeline with no warnings. Fewer steps means there are fewer places for errors and warning to creep in.
  • Only two "Capture Position" steps. The first version had a lot and I suspect that was the root of my problem.
  • Additional features. I added models for leveling feet and workbench casters which will now show up in the parts list.

And the result:
Table Furniture Wood Rectangle Drawer


Features
  • 4' x 7' x 34" overall. I plan to get a Grizzly 1023RLX table saw. And it can be an auxiliary assembly table.
  • Extended overhang to accommodate dust collection to the cabinet.
  • Casters so I can move it out of the way and park the truck when we have hurricanes.
  • The top is two 3/4" plywood sheets trimmed with poplar.
  • Open shelves for lumber and/or table saw jigs. One or more bays may have drawers added later.

I'm not sure how much further I want to go. I'm considering adding in the fasteners, mostly because I can. I don't plan on modeling the miter grooves since they are totally dependent on the actual table saw. I do need to set up dimensioned 2D drawings which is another adventure in Fusion 360. Part of the fun is creating A sheets and having room left for drawing after the title block. If there is interest, I'll figure out how to make the drawings available.

I know I said I was working on the adjustable height assembly table and, actually, I have. The legs, torsion box top and frame are 90% complete. Of course the first 90% takes 90% of the time, the remaining 10% takes the other 90% of the time. Anyway, it looks like I'll need to acquire the linear actuator and reverse engineer a model to finish.
Update not worth a new post…

The original dimensions for the outfeed table were based on the envelope dimensions. The actual table size for the G1023RLX is 27"x74". So now I'll find out how well I did the parametric design. Turns out, not so hot. One set of legs ad the frame didn't resize. Off to fix the parameterization…

Well, that wasn't so bad. Fixed one extrude that wasn't parameterized and moved some components. I'd post an image, but it doesn't look that much different as you might expect since it only changed by 10" in length.

For those of you using Fusion 360, here's a lesson learned. Move defaults to body, even if you have a component selected from the browser. Now you will get some strange behavior if the component you want to move is a copy. Fusion will move all the bodies of all the copies of the component relative to the original component origin. The solution (after doing an undo) is to insure that move is moving components or whatever you intend to move.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Drill Press Stand - Design

I'm employing an almost-everything-on-wheels strategy in my shop. About the only thing not on wheels will be the miter saw station. The Nova Viking benchtop drill press will get a rolling stand that includes storage for drill bits and other drill press related things. The Fusion design is done:
Tire Furniture Cabinetry Product Plant

Admittedly, it's not much different from other similar stands. Of note are the casters located outside the carcase. The Viking weighs in at a hefty 100+ pounds and the direct drive motor makes it very top heavy. Spreading out the castors should make it less tippy. The outriggers are are going to be dust collectors, but I'll accept that trade for additional stability. It's not shown in the render, but, borrowing from something I saw on an April Wilkerson video, the top drawer will have a sliding tray for all those loose bits I've accumulated over the years.
 

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Drill Press Stand - Design

I'm employing an almost-everything-on-wheels strategy in my shop. About the only thing not on wheels will be the miter saw station. The Nova Viking benchtop drill press will get a rolling stand that includes storage for drill bits and other drill press related things. The Fusion design is done:
Tire Furniture Cabinetry Product Plant

Admittedly, it's not much different from other similar stands. Of note are the casters located outside the carcase. The Viking weighs in at a hefty 100+ pounds and the direct drive motor makes it very top heavy. Spreading out the castors should make it less tippy. The outriggers are are going to be dust collectors, but I'll accept that trade for additional stability. It's not shown in the render, but, borrowing from something I saw on an April Wilkerson video, the top drawer will have a sliding tray for all those loose bits I've accumulated over the years.
Handsome design, should serve you well. I ordered my Viking about 3 weeks ago. Maybe get it in September? Did you get your's yet?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Drill Press Stand - Design

I'm employing an almost-everything-on-wheels strategy in my shop. About the only thing not on wheels will be the miter saw station. The Nova Viking benchtop drill press will get a rolling stand that includes storage for drill bits and other drill press related things. The Fusion design is done:
Tire Furniture Cabinetry Product Plant

Admittedly, it's not much different from other similar stands. Of note are the casters located outside the carcase. The Viking weighs in at a hefty 100+ pounds and the direct drive motor makes it very top heavy. Spreading out the castors should make it less tippy. The outriggers are are going to be dust collectors, but I'll accept that trade for additional stability. It's not shown in the render, but, borrowing from something I saw on an April Wilkerson video, the top drawer will have a sliding tray for all those loose bits I've accumulated over the years.
Yes, I have mine. Got it the same day.

I had placed an order online because the site led me to believe that they had them in stock. When they called to tell me it was backordered with a really long lead time, I went back online to look again. Rockler showed that it was in stock at the "local" store. I called to confirm and, sure enough, they had two. Neither had a name on them so I bought one over the phone. I called the online site and canceled that order then headed off to pick up my new drill press. I had to pay sales tax, but I didn't have to pay shipping so I actually came out slightly ahead.

It's easy to just jump online to order stuff. I live out in the sticks and Amazon is a regular visitor here. The thing is, a lot of online "stores" don't actually stock everything they sell. They place an order and have it drop shipped. That puts you in what could be a long line. But, sometimes it's a good idea to check local stores, particularly the chains. Stores like Rockler will order based on expected sales with regular reorders to keep stock on the shelf. As in my story, they often have what you're looking for in stock.
 

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Drill Press Stand - Design

I'm employing an almost-everything-on-wheels strategy in my shop. About the only thing not on wheels will be the miter saw station. The Nova Viking benchtop drill press will get a rolling stand that includes storage for drill bits and other drill press related things. The Fusion design is done:
Tire Furniture Cabinetry Product Plant

Admittedly, it's not much different from other similar stands. Of note are the casters located outside the carcase. The Viking weighs in at a hefty 100+ pounds and the direct drive motor makes it very top heavy. Spreading out the castors should make it less tippy. The outriggers are are going to be dust collectors, but I'll accept that trade for additional stability. It's not shown in the render, but, borrowing from something I saw on an April Wilkerson video, the top drawer will have a sliding tray for all those loose bits I've accumulated over the years.
mawilson, thank for responding and so quickly! I don't have much experience with this LJ site and was expecting a notification when your response came in… and I had been looking, but dove deeper and saw your answer, today. I live in an area where there are no distributors within hundreds of miles. So, I am waiting for my new toy, patiently! Fortunately I have a Wen 12" DP that I recently repaired to work on until it arrives. I want to build a new stand for the Viking as well. To determine the height of my rolling stand I am thinking the bottom of the chuck should be about three inches above my sternum. Can you give me the measurement from the bottom of the drill press base to the bottom of the chuck? Then I can begin designing & building one similar to yours. Thank you again for your kind advise and reply. I clicked "add this blog entry to my watchlist" so I should respond more promptly this time;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Drill Press Stand - Design

I'm employing an almost-everything-on-wheels strategy in my shop. About the only thing not on wheels will be the miter saw station. The Nova Viking benchtop drill press will get a rolling stand that includes storage for drill bits and other drill press related things. The Fusion design is done:
Tire Furniture Cabinetry Product Plant

Admittedly, it's not much different from other similar stands. Of note are the casters located outside the carcase. The Viking weighs in at a hefty 100+ pounds and the direct drive motor makes it very top heavy. Spreading out the castors should make it less tippy. The outriggers are are going to be dust collectors, but I'll accept that trade for additional stability. It's not shown in the render, but, borrowing from something I saw on an April Wilkerson video, the top drawer will have a sliding tray for all those loose bits I've accumulated over the years.
The stand as shown is 34" tall to match the benchtops and the table saw in keeping with the term "benchtop". The Viking is ~26" from the bottom of the base to the spindle, ~23" to the bottom of the chuck. That would put the spindle at ~60" which may be okay since I'm just shy of 6' tall.
 

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Drill Press Stand - Design

I'm employing an almost-everything-on-wheels strategy in my shop. About the only thing not on wheels will be the miter saw station. The Nova Viking benchtop drill press will get a rolling stand that includes storage for drill bits and other drill press related things. The Fusion design is done:
Tire Furniture Cabinetry Product Plant

Admittedly, it's not much different from other similar stands. Of note are the casters located outside the carcase. The Viking weighs in at a hefty 100+ pounds and the direct drive motor makes it very top heavy. Spreading out the castors should make it less tippy. The outriggers are are going to be dust collectors, but I'll accept that trade for additional stability. It's not shown in the render, but, borrowing from something I saw on an April Wilkerson video, the top drawer will have a sliding tray for all those loose bits I've accumulated over the years.
Perfect! Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Outfeed Table - Design, Take Two

Looking back at the outfeed table design, I see that it's way over-engineered. 2×6 framing is overkill. 6 legs seems to be too much as well. After watching a You Tube video from J-woodworking (a Korean hobbyist), I took a shot at reworking the outfeed table design. Not so much rework as start over.

The basic design survived. It's still 34" tall, 48" wide and 84" long. It still has two shelves under the top. The overhang on the saw side is still 12". The top is still two sheets of plywood.

Furniture Table Shelf Rectangle Natural material


Rectangle Wood Wood stain Plank Hardwood


The image doesn't show the details clearly. The legs are two 1 1/2×3 cut from 2x stock and glued to make a 3×3. The rest of the framing is 1 1/2×3. The frames use lap joints for the cross members. Legs are joined to the top frame with, for lack of a better name, what I'd call a castle joint:

Wood Art Rectangle Wood stain Wooden block


The outside ends and side of the shelf supports are dovetailed into the legs.

This design probably isn't stronger, but it is more interesting.

PS. This version will have workshop casters, too, just as soon as I correct the CAD model I got from Sketchup. As an aside, many of the models in the Sketchup 3-D Warehouse look good, but contain errors other CAD tools (e.g. Fusion) take exception to.
 

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