LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Making room for the bench...

So as my work (and obsession) has turned more towards hand tools, and my recent reading of Chris Schwarz's workbench book, I decided to make some shop adjustments to make room for a nice Roubo bench in my near future. I you look at my shop phots you will see a long L shaped counter top with a corner desk. While this has provide a lot of work space, the rooke mistake was in my using really wet construction grade lumber that proceeded to warp and twist out of control over the seasons. Secondly, so much fixed counter space really is constrictive to shop work flow. So the first step was to move my drill press to an independent rolling cart. You can find this in my projects page. That freed up counterspace to be eventually eliminated. Next I cut out the corner desk and removed the right angle desk top.

Photobucket

Photobucket

You can see that I painted the walls after the counters were installed in this second shot. Next I removed the counter itself. I plan to reuse this lumber to make a sharpening station at some point in the future. This is how I built the drill press cart as well.

Photobucket

Here I have laid some 2×4s across the cabinets as ribs for support as well as an attachment point from base cabinet to the top which will be formica laminate. The space calls for just over 11 feet so I wanted to use this as an opportunity to practice cutting half lap joinery by hand.

Photobucket

Here I marked the cut lines using a marking gauge and you can see me chiseling out the knife wall before making the saw cut.

Photobucket

From there I made more cuts to practice my technique and to make chiseling out the waste easier. Sorry I got a little involved at this stage and forgot to take pictures. There is a great illustration of this on The Lost Art Press blog that follows the same steps I used from chiseling to using a router plane to clean up the cheeks. One the ribs were glued, I cut dados using the same technique to correspond to all the base cabinet sides. I then screwed the ribs down to the base.

The counter top is two sheets of 3/4 MDF glued and screwed together with laminate top and a red oak edge band secured with biscuits. I then flushed the edge using an edge trimming plane. Here is the final result.

Photobucket

This new countertop is flat, level, and nice and slick. Glue comes right off it as does finish. I am really happy with it and I know it will serve me well for some time to come. Now I have a lot more free floor space and still a lot of counter top. Next comes the bench build to take up that floor space!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,252 Posts
Making room for the bench...

So as my work (and obsession) has turned more towards hand tools, and my recent reading of Chris Schwarz's workbench book, I decided to make some shop adjustments to make room for a nice Roubo bench in my near future. I you look at my shop phots you will see a long L shaped counter top with a corner desk. While this has provide a lot of work space, the rooke mistake was in my using really wet construction grade lumber that proceeded to warp and twist out of control over the seasons. Secondly, so much fixed counter space really is constrictive to shop work flow. So the first step was to move my drill press to an independent rolling cart. You can find this in my projects page. That freed up counterspace to be eventually eliminated. Next I cut out the corner desk and removed the right angle desk top.

Photobucket

Photobucket

You can see that I painted the walls after the counters were installed in this second shot. Next I removed the counter itself. I plan to reuse this lumber to make a sharpening station at some point in the future. This is how I built the drill press cart as well.

Photobucket

Here I have laid some 2×4s across the cabinets as ribs for support as well as an attachment point from base cabinet to the top which will be formica laminate. The space calls for just over 11 feet so I wanted to use this as an opportunity to practice cutting half lap joinery by hand.

Photobucket

Here I marked the cut lines using a marking gauge and you can see me chiseling out the knife wall before making the saw cut.

Photobucket

From there I made more cuts to practice my technique and to make chiseling out the waste easier. Sorry I got a little involved at this stage and forgot to take pictures. There is a great illustration of this on The Lost Art Press blog that follows the same steps I used from chiseling to using a router plane to clean up the cheeks. One the ribs were glued, I cut dados using the same technique to correspond to all the base cabinet sides. I then screwed the ribs down to the base.

The counter top is two sheets of 3/4 MDF glued and screwed together with laminate top and a red oak edge band secured with biscuits. I then flushed the edge using an edge trimming plane. Here is the final result.

Photobucket

This new countertop is flat, level, and nice and slick. Glue comes right off it as does finish. I am really happy with it and I know it will serve me well for some time to come. Now I have a lot more free floor space and still a lot of counter top. Next comes the bench build to take up that floor space!
You did a nice job on the counter, Shannon. It looks pretty good. With two layers of mdf it is really solid.

Thanks for the post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,079 Posts
Making room for the bench...

So as my work (and obsession) has turned more towards hand tools, and my recent reading of Chris Schwarz's workbench book, I decided to make some shop adjustments to make room for a nice Roubo bench in my near future. I you look at my shop phots you will see a long L shaped counter top with a corner desk. While this has provide a lot of work space, the rooke mistake was in my using really wet construction grade lumber that proceeded to warp and twist out of control over the seasons. Secondly, so much fixed counter space really is constrictive to shop work flow. So the first step was to move my drill press to an independent rolling cart. You can find this in my projects page. That freed up counterspace to be eventually eliminated. Next I cut out the corner desk and removed the right angle desk top.

Photobucket

Photobucket

You can see that I painted the walls after the counters were installed in this second shot. Next I removed the counter itself. I plan to reuse this lumber to make a sharpening station at some point in the future. This is how I built the drill press cart as well.

Photobucket

Here I have laid some 2×4s across the cabinets as ribs for support as well as an attachment point from base cabinet to the top which will be formica laminate. The space calls for just over 11 feet so I wanted to use this as an opportunity to practice cutting half lap joinery by hand.

Photobucket

Here I marked the cut lines using a marking gauge and you can see me chiseling out the knife wall before making the saw cut.

Photobucket

From there I made more cuts to practice my technique and to make chiseling out the waste easier. Sorry I got a little involved at this stage and forgot to take pictures. There is a great illustration of this on The Lost Art Press blog that follows the same steps I used from chiseling to using a router plane to clean up the cheeks. One the ribs were glued, I cut dados using the same technique to correspond to all the base cabinet sides. I then screwed the ribs down to the base.

The counter top is two sheets of 3/4 MDF glued and screwed together with laminate top and a red oak edge band secured with biscuits. I then flushed the edge using an edge trimming plane. Here is the final result.

Photobucket

This new countertop is flat, level, and nice and slick. Glue comes right off it as does finish. I am really happy with it and I know it will serve me well for some time to come. Now I have a lot more free floor space and still a lot of counter top. Next comes the bench build to take up that floor space!
Good job. Ain't woodworkin' fun?

always,
J.C.
 

·
In Loving Memory
Joined
·
10,319 Posts
Making room for the bench...

So as my work (and obsession) has turned more towards hand tools, and my recent reading of Chris Schwarz's workbench book, I decided to make some shop adjustments to make room for a nice Roubo bench in my near future. I you look at my shop phots you will see a long L shaped counter top with a corner desk. While this has provide a lot of work space, the rooke mistake was in my using really wet construction grade lumber that proceeded to warp and twist out of control over the seasons. Secondly, so much fixed counter space really is constrictive to shop work flow. So the first step was to move my drill press to an independent rolling cart. You can find this in my projects page. That freed up counterspace to be eventually eliminated. Next I cut out the corner desk and removed the right angle desk top.

Photobucket

Photobucket

You can see that I painted the walls after the counters were installed in this second shot. Next I removed the counter itself. I plan to reuse this lumber to make a sharpening station at some point in the future. This is how I built the drill press cart as well.

Photobucket

Here I have laid some 2×4s across the cabinets as ribs for support as well as an attachment point from base cabinet to the top which will be formica laminate. The space calls for just over 11 feet so I wanted to use this as an opportunity to practice cutting half lap joinery by hand.

Photobucket

Here I marked the cut lines using a marking gauge and you can see me chiseling out the knife wall before making the saw cut.

Photobucket

From there I made more cuts to practice my technique and to make chiseling out the waste easier. Sorry I got a little involved at this stage and forgot to take pictures. There is a great illustration of this on The Lost Art Press blog that follows the same steps I used from chiseling to using a router plane to clean up the cheeks. One the ribs were glued, I cut dados using the same technique to correspond to all the base cabinet sides. I then screwed the ribs down to the base.

The counter top is two sheets of 3/4 MDF glued and screwed together with laminate top and a red oak edge band secured with biscuits. I then flushed the edge using an edge trimming plane. Here is the final result.

Photobucket

This new countertop is flat, level, and nice and slick. Glue comes right off it as does finish. I am really happy with it and I know it will serve me well for some time to come. Now I have a lot more free floor space and still a lot of counter top. Next comes the bench build to take up that floor space!
Out with old in with the new!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
918 Posts
Making room for the bench...

So as my work (and obsession) has turned more towards hand tools, and my recent reading of Chris Schwarz's workbench book, I decided to make some shop adjustments to make room for a nice Roubo bench in my near future. I you look at my shop phots you will see a long L shaped counter top with a corner desk. While this has provide a lot of work space, the rooke mistake was in my using really wet construction grade lumber that proceeded to warp and twist out of control over the seasons. Secondly, so much fixed counter space really is constrictive to shop work flow. So the first step was to move my drill press to an independent rolling cart. You can find this in my projects page. That freed up counterspace to be eventually eliminated. Next I cut out the corner desk and removed the right angle desk top.

Photobucket

Photobucket

You can see that I painted the walls after the counters were installed in this second shot. Next I removed the counter itself. I plan to reuse this lumber to make a sharpening station at some point in the future. This is how I built the drill press cart as well.

Photobucket

Here I have laid some 2×4s across the cabinets as ribs for support as well as an attachment point from base cabinet to the top which will be formica laminate. The space calls for just over 11 feet so I wanted to use this as an opportunity to practice cutting half lap joinery by hand.

Photobucket

Here I marked the cut lines using a marking gauge and you can see me chiseling out the knife wall before making the saw cut.

Photobucket

From there I made more cuts to practice my technique and to make chiseling out the waste easier. Sorry I got a little involved at this stage and forgot to take pictures. There is a great illustration of this on The Lost Art Press blog that follows the same steps I used from chiseling to using a router plane to clean up the cheeks. One the ribs were glued, I cut dados using the same technique to correspond to all the base cabinet sides. I then screwed the ribs down to the base.

The counter top is two sheets of 3/4 MDF glued and screwed together with laminate top and a red oak edge band secured with biscuits. I then flushed the edge using an edge trimming plane. Here is the final result.

Photobucket

This new countertop is flat, level, and nice and slick. Glue comes right off it as does finish. I am really happy with it and I know it will serve me well for some time to come. Now I have a lot more free floor space and still a lot of counter top. Next comes the bench build to take up that floor space!
Nice work, looks great so far.
 

·
In Loving Memory
Joined
·
26,886 Posts
Making room for the bench...

So as my work (and obsession) has turned more towards hand tools, and my recent reading of Chris Schwarz's workbench book, I decided to make some shop adjustments to make room for a nice Roubo bench in my near future. I you look at my shop phots you will see a long L shaped counter top with a corner desk. While this has provide a lot of work space, the rooke mistake was in my using really wet construction grade lumber that proceeded to warp and twist out of control over the seasons. Secondly, so much fixed counter space really is constrictive to shop work flow. So the first step was to move my drill press to an independent rolling cart. You can find this in my projects page. That freed up counterspace to be eventually eliminated. Next I cut out the corner desk and removed the right angle desk top.

Photobucket

Photobucket

You can see that I painted the walls after the counters were installed in this second shot. Next I removed the counter itself. I plan to reuse this lumber to make a sharpening station at some point in the future. This is how I built the drill press cart as well.

Photobucket

Here I have laid some 2×4s across the cabinets as ribs for support as well as an attachment point from base cabinet to the top which will be formica laminate. The space calls for just over 11 feet so I wanted to use this as an opportunity to practice cutting half lap joinery by hand.

Photobucket

Here I marked the cut lines using a marking gauge and you can see me chiseling out the knife wall before making the saw cut.

Photobucket

From there I made more cuts to practice my technique and to make chiseling out the waste easier. Sorry I got a little involved at this stage and forgot to take pictures. There is a great illustration of this on The Lost Art Press blog that follows the same steps I used from chiseling to using a router plane to clean up the cheeks. One the ribs were glued, I cut dados using the same technique to correspond to all the base cabinet sides. I then screwed the ribs down to the base.

The counter top is two sheets of 3/4 MDF glued and screwed together with laminate top and a red oak edge band secured with biscuits. I then flushed the edge using an edge trimming plane. Here is the final result.

Photobucket

This new countertop is flat, level, and nice and slick. Glue comes right off it as does finish. I am really happy with it and I know it will serve me well for some time to come. Now I have a lot more free floor space and still a lot of counter top. Next comes the bench build to take up that floor space!
Neat shop Shannon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Table Saw Extension Router Table #1

After completing the new counter top, my next step will be to breakdown the adjacent cabinet that I used to store my 13" planer and bench top router table. Eventually, I will store the planer on the bottom shelf of the workbench.

Photobucket

I have been eyeing the Maste-R-Lift from JessEm for a while so I thought this would be a good time to invest. First I glued and screwed together 2 pieces of 27×20" 3/4 MDF and edge glued and biscuited some scrap 3/4 ash to the sides. Here is the assembly in the clamps

Photobucket

I am going to use some of the leftover laminate from the counter top project for the surface of the table and I want it to run all the way to the edge. To insure a perfectly flat top, I raised the fence on my biscuit joiner 1/32" when I cut the slots on the ash so that the side pieces were 1/32 proud of the MDF substrate. Here I am planing the side flush with the edge trimming plane.

Photobucket

Next, I used Miller dowells to reinforce the corners…

Photobucket

Then I flush trimmed them with my Bakuma…

Photobucket

Here I brushed on the laminate glue onto the table top and the laminate. I let it dry for one hour.

Photobucket

Finally, I used a trim router to flush the top and then my BU Jack plane to put a slight chamfer on the edge to take the sharp corner off.

Photobucket

Time to call it a day. Tomorrow I will position it in the table saw and mark the holes for the screw inserts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,799 Posts
Table Saw Extension Router Table #1

After completing the new counter top, my next step will be to breakdown the adjacent cabinet that I used to store my 13" planer and bench top router table. Eventually, I will store the planer on the bottom shelf of the workbench.

Photobucket

I have been eyeing the Maste-R-Lift from JessEm for a while so I thought this would be a good time to invest. First I glued and screwed together 2 pieces of 27×20" 3/4 MDF and edge glued and biscuited some scrap 3/4 ash to the sides. Here is the assembly in the clamps

Photobucket

I am going to use some of the leftover laminate from the counter top project for the surface of the table and I want it to run all the way to the edge. To insure a perfectly flat top, I raised the fence on my biscuit joiner 1/32" when I cut the slots on the ash so that the side pieces were 1/32 proud of the MDF substrate. Here I am planing the side flush with the edge trimming plane.

Photobucket

Next, I used Miller dowells to reinforce the corners…

Photobucket

Then I flush trimmed them with my Bakuma…

Photobucket

Here I brushed on the laminate glue onto the table top and the laminate. I let it dry for one hour.

Photobucket

Finally, I used a trim router to flush the top and then my BU Jack plane to put a slight chamfer on the edge to take the sharp corner off.

Photobucket

Time to call it a day. Tomorrow I will position it in the table saw and mark the holes for the screw inserts.
looking nice. can't wait to see the finished product. thanks for the post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,252 Posts
Table Saw Extension Router Table #1

After completing the new counter top, my next step will be to breakdown the adjacent cabinet that I used to store my 13" planer and bench top router table. Eventually, I will store the planer on the bottom shelf of the workbench.

Photobucket

I have been eyeing the Maste-R-Lift from JessEm for a while so I thought this would be a good time to invest. First I glued and screwed together 2 pieces of 27×20" 3/4 MDF and edge glued and biscuited some scrap 3/4 ash to the sides. Here is the assembly in the clamps

Photobucket

I am going to use some of the leftover laminate from the counter top project for the surface of the table and I want it to run all the way to the edge. To insure a perfectly flat top, I raised the fence on my biscuit joiner 1/32" when I cut the slots on the ash so that the side pieces were 1/32 proud of the MDF substrate. Here I am planing the side flush with the edge trimming plane.

Photobucket

Next, I used Miller dowells to reinforce the corners…

Photobucket

Then I flush trimmed them with my Bakuma…

Photobucket

Here I brushed on the laminate glue onto the table top and the laminate. I let it dry for one hour.

Photobucket

Finally, I used a trim router to flush the top and then my BU Jack plane to put a slight chamfer on the edge to take the sharp corner off.

Photobucket

Time to call it a day. Tomorrow I will position it in the table saw and mark the holes for the screw inserts.
This is looking pretty good. This will be a nice addition to your shop when you are finished.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,904 Posts
Table Saw Extension Router Table #1

After completing the new counter top, my next step will be to breakdown the adjacent cabinet that I used to store my 13" planer and bench top router table. Eventually, I will store the planer on the bottom shelf of the workbench.

Photobucket

I have been eyeing the Maste-R-Lift from JessEm for a while so I thought this would be a good time to invest. First I glued and screwed together 2 pieces of 27×20" 3/4 MDF and edge glued and biscuited some scrap 3/4 ash to the sides. Here is the assembly in the clamps

Photobucket

I am going to use some of the leftover laminate from the counter top project for the surface of the table and I want it to run all the way to the edge. To insure a perfectly flat top, I raised the fence on my biscuit joiner 1/32" when I cut the slots on the ash so that the side pieces were 1/32 proud of the MDF substrate. Here I am planing the side flush with the edge trimming plane.

Photobucket

Next, I used Miller dowells to reinforce the corners…

Photobucket

Then I flush trimmed them with my Bakuma…

Photobucket

Here I brushed on the laminate glue onto the table top and the laminate. I let it dry for one hour.

Photobucket

Finally, I used a trim router to flush the top and then my BU Jack plane to put a slight chamfer on the edge to take the sharp corner off.

Photobucket

Time to call it a day. Tomorrow I will position it in the table saw and mark the holes for the screw inserts.
I just love watching the progress!
 

·
In Loving Memory
Joined
·
10,319 Posts
Table Saw Extension Router Table #1

After completing the new counter top, my next step will be to breakdown the adjacent cabinet that I used to store my 13" planer and bench top router table. Eventually, I will store the planer on the bottom shelf of the workbench.

Photobucket

I have been eyeing the Maste-R-Lift from JessEm for a while so I thought this would be a good time to invest. First I glued and screwed together 2 pieces of 27×20" 3/4 MDF and edge glued and biscuited some scrap 3/4 ash to the sides. Here is the assembly in the clamps

Photobucket

I am going to use some of the leftover laminate from the counter top project for the surface of the table and I want it to run all the way to the edge. To insure a perfectly flat top, I raised the fence on my biscuit joiner 1/32" when I cut the slots on the ash so that the side pieces were 1/32 proud of the MDF substrate. Here I am planing the side flush with the edge trimming plane.

Photobucket

Next, I used Miller dowells to reinforce the corners…

Photobucket

Then I flush trimmed them with my Bakuma…

Photobucket

Here I brushed on the laminate glue onto the table top and the laminate. I let it dry for one hour.

Photobucket

Finally, I used a trim router to flush the top and then my BU Jack plane to put a slight chamfer on the edge to take the sharp corner off.

Photobucket

Time to call it a day. Tomorrow I will position it in the table saw and mark the holes for the screw inserts.
Looking good so far!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
813 Posts
Table Saw Extension Router Table #1

After completing the new counter top, my next step will be to breakdown the adjacent cabinet that I used to store my 13" planer and bench top router table. Eventually, I will store the planer on the bottom shelf of the workbench.

Photobucket

I have been eyeing the Maste-R-Lift from JessEm for a while so I thought this would be a good time to invest. First I glued and screwed together 2 pieces of 27×20" 3/4 MDF and edge glued and biscuited some scrap 3/4 ash to the sides. Here is the assembly in the clamps

Photobucket

I am going to use some of the leftover laminate from the counter top project for the surface of the table and I want it to run all the way to the edge. To insure a perfectly flat top, I raised the fence on my biscuit joiner 1/32" when I cut the slots on the ash so that the side pieces were 1/32 proud of the MDF substrate. Here I am planing the side flush with the edge trimming plane.

Photobucket

Next, I used Miller dowells to reinforce the corners…

Photobucket

Then I flush trimmed them with my Bakuma…

Photobucket

Here I brushed on the laminate glue onto the table top and the laminate. I let it dry for one hour.

Photobucket

Finally, I used a trim router to flush the top and then my BU Jack plane to put a slight chamfer on the edge to take the sharp corner off.

Photobucket

Time to call it a day. Tomorrow I will position it in the table saw and mark the holes for the screw inserts.
Looking good!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Router Table #2: I hate routing MDF!!!

Let me just start by saying…I hate to rout MDF!!!! Thank goodness for the respirator, air cleaner, and dust collector. That stuff is nasty to cut, but routing it definately takes the cake on the least favorite things to do list.

Anyway, when we last left off, I was about to install the table into the table saw. Because of the location of the hold in my TS rails, I needed to use screw inserts.

Photobucket

I friction fit the router table into the TS and supported it from below to keep it level. Using a punch set, I marked the hole locations. I then drilled for the fasteners. I used two different kinds because the front rail needs a countersunk screw so the fence operation is not hindered. I couldn't find any bugle head bolts in the 3/8 size that other inserts used, hence the little brass one you see in the photo. I also used a forstner bit to drill out the footprint of the insert so it would sit flush to the table edge once screwed into place.

Then I put everything in place and tightened it down.

Photobucket

I got a JessEm template to rout the opening when I was at my local Woodcraft. They had it sitting out on the bargain table and I got it for $5! This definately saved me some time. Here I have double stick taped it in place and am ready to rout.

Photobucket

I took several passes to get to the 3/8 depth of the plate plus a little extra for shim room. Then I drilled out corners for my jigsaw blade in order to cut our the rest.

Photobucket

Here is where I realized my error. I have routed the recess just a touch too deep and had over estimated the leveling capacity of the screws set into the bottom of the router plate. I needed to put some shims in place. I had some White Oak and Padauk edging laying around so I ran it through the planer to get it down to 1/8" and glued it in place. I figure if nothing else, this will allow for more wear and tear on the ledge the plate sits on.

Photobucket

Everything clamped up and drying. Next I will build a couple of bit drawers that I can mount to the underside of the table for some on board storage. I am also thinking of building a box around the router to put in some dust collection. I haven't figured that part out yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Router Table #2: I hate routing MDF!!!

Let me just start by saying…I hate to rout MDF!!!! Thank goodness for the respirator, air cleaner, and dust collector. That stuff is nasty to cut, but routing it definately takes the cake on the least favorite things to do list.

Anyway, when we last left off, I was about to install the table into the table saw. Because of the location of the hold in my TS rails, I needed to use screw inserts.

Photobucket

I friction fit the router table into the TS and supported it from below to keep it level. Using a punch set, I marked the hole locations. I then drilled for the fasteners. I used two different kinds because the front rail needs a countersunk screw so the fence operation is not hindered. I couldn't find any bugle head bolts in the 3/8 size that other inserts used, hence the little brass one you see in the photo. I also used a forstner bit to drill out the footprint of the insert so it would sit flush to the table edge once screwed into place.

Then I put everything in place and tightened it down.

Photobucket

I got a JessEm template to rout the opening when I was at my local Woodcraft. They had it sitting out on the bargain table and I got it for $5! This definately saved me some time. Here I have double stick taped it in place and am ready to rout.

Photobucket

I took several passes to get to the 3/8 depth of the plate plus a little extra for shim room. Then I drilled out corners for my jigsaw blade in order to cut our the rest.

Photobucket

Here is where I realized my error. I have routed the recess just a touch too deep and had over estimated the leveling capacity of the screws set into the bottom of the router plate. I needed to put some shims in place. I had some White Oak and Padauk edging laying around so I ran it through the planer to get it down to 1/8" and glued it in place. I figure if nothing else, this will allow for more wear and tear on the ledge the plate sits on.

Photobucket

Everything clamped up and drying. Next I will build a couple of bit drawers that I can mount to the underside of the table for some on board storage. I am also thinking of building a box around the router to put in some dust collection. I haven't figured that part out yet.
I have a love/hate relationship with MDF. I consider myself to be fairly allergy free, but MDF gives me fits. When I work with it, I wear a mask and goggles, but I still get a burning sensation on the exposed areas of my face. I understand there are some pretty serious chemicals in MDF. More should be done to make the public aware of the hazards.
 

·
In Loving Memory
Joined
·
10,319 Posts
Router Table #2: I hate routing MDF!!!

Let me just start by saying…I hate to rout MDF!!!! Thank goodness for the respirator, air cleaner, and dust collector. That stuff is nasty to cut, but routing it definately takes the cake on the least favorite things to do list.

Anyway, when we last left off, I was about to install the table into the table saw. Because of the location of the hold in my TS rails, I needed to use screw inserts.

Photobucket

I friction fit the router table into the TS and supported it from below to keep it level. Using a punch set, I marked the hole locations. I then drilled for the fasteners. I used two different kinds because the front rail needs a countersunk screw so the fence operation is not hindered. I couldn't find any bugle head bolts in the 3/8 size that other inserts used, hence the little brass one you see in the photo. I also used a forstner bit to drill out the footprint of the insert so it would sit flush to the table edge once screwed into place.

Then I put everything in place and tightened it down.

Photobucket

I got a JessEm template to rout the opening when I was at my local Woodcraft. They had it sitting out on the bargain table and I got it for $5! This definately saved me some time. Here I have double stick taped it in place and am ready to rout.

Photobucket

I took several passes to get to the 3/8 depth of the plate plus a little extra for shim room. Then I drilled out corners for my jigsaw blade in order to cut our the rest.

Photobucket

Here is where I realized my error. I have routed the recess just a touch too deep and had over estimated the leveling capacity of the screws set into the bottom of the router plate. I needed to put some shims in place. I had some White Oak and Padauk edging laying around so I ran it through the planer to get it down to 1/8" and glued it in place. I figure if nothing else, this will allow for more wear and tear on the ledge the plate sits on.

Photobucket

Everything clamped up and drying. Next I will build a couple of bit drawers that I can mount to the underside of the table for some on board storage. I am also thinking of building a box around the router to put in some dust collection. I haven't figured that part out yet.
Happens to all of us!

As long as you can get out of it you are doing all right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
813 Posts
Router Table #2: I hate routing MDF!!!

Let me just start by saying…I hate to rout MDF!!!! Thank goodness for the respirator, air cleaner, and dust collector. That stuff is nasty to cut, but routing it definately takes the cake on the least favorite things to do list.

Anyway, when we last left off, I was about to install the table into the table saw. Because of the location of the hold in my TS rails, I needed to use screw inserts.

Photobucket

I friction fit the router table into the TS and supported it from below to keep it level. Using a punch set, I marked the hole locations. I then drilled for the fasteners. I used two different kinds because the front rail needs a countersunk screw so the fence operation is not hindered. I couldn't find any bugle head bolts in the 3/8 size that other inserts used, hence the little brass one you see in the photo. I also used a forstner bit to drill out the footprint of the insert so it would sit flush to the table edge once screwed into place.

Then I put everything in place and tightened it down.

Photobucket

I got a JessEm template to rout the opening when I was at my local Woodcraft. They had it sitting out on the bargain table and I got it for $5! This definately saved me some time. Here I have double stick taped it in place and am ready to rout.

Photobucket

I took several passes to get to the 3/8 depth of the plate plus a little extra for shim room. Then I drilled out corners for my jigsaw blade in order to cut our the rest.

Photobucket

Here is where I realized my error. I have routed the recess just a touch too deep and had over estimated the leveling capacity of the screws set into the bottom of the router plate. I needed to put some shims in place. I had some White Oak and Padauk edging laying around so I ran it through the planer to get it down to 1/8" and glued it in place. I figure if nothing else, this will allow for more wear and tear on the ledge the plate sits on.

Photobucket

Everything clamped up and drying. Next I will build a couple of bit drawers that I can mount to the underside of the table for some on board storage. I am also thinking of building a box around the router to put in some dust collection. I haven't figured that part out yet.
MDF cuts and routs nicely, but man does it make a mess!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Router Table #3: Putting in the plate and installing the fence...

So I got the Mast-R-Lift in place and did some tweaking of the leveler screws to get it flush with the top.

Photobucket

Next I needed to think about the fence. I know that I will be able to use my TS fence, but I have this Rockler fence floating around from my old drill press table. As far as I can tell, this is the same as their router table fence just a little smaller. I think it will work fine for my purposes and I can always modify it later if need be. Here I routed the channel for the T bolts that mount the fence.

Photobucket

Normally I would rout a larger channel on the bottom to not allow the T bolt to turn. But once I laid out the lines I realized that it is close enough to the edge so that the side piece will trap the T bolts. This was great and allowed me to just rout one channel in a few passes and I was set to go.

Photobucket

Finally, I attached the dust collection to the fence from the drill press set up. I mounted the router and made a few test cuts and I think this fence will serve my needs very well. This is a major step up from my old table as I had one of those Router Workshop set ups.

Photobucket

I have drawn up some preliminary plans for a "cabinet" of sorts that will allow me minimal bit storage but mostly it will enclose my router and allow for some dust collection. I will probably build in some angle supports for extra support so that there is not so much weight on the TS rails.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,799 Posts
Router Table #3: Putting in the plate and installing the fence...

So I got the Mast-R-Lift in place and did some tweaking of the leveler screws to get it flush with the top.

Photobucket

Next I needed to think about the fence. I know that I will be able to use my TS fence, but I have this Rockler fence floating around from my old drill press table. As far as I can tell, this is the same as their router table fence just a little smaller. I think it will work fine for my purposes and I can always modify it later if need be. Here I routed the channel for the T bolts that mount the fence.

Photobucket

Normally I would rout a larger channel on the bottom to not allow the T bolt to turn. But once I laid out the lines I realized that it is close enough to the edge so that the side piece will trap the T bolts. This was great and allowed me to just rout one channel in a few passes and I was set to go.

Photobucket

Finally, I attached the dust collection to the fence from the drill press set up. I mounted the router and made a few test cuts and I think this fence will serve my needs very well. This is a major step up from my old table as I had one of those Router Workshop set ups.

Photobucket

I have drawn up some preliminary plans for a "cabinet" of sorts that will allow me minimal bit storage but mostly it will enclose my router and allow for some dust collection. I will probably build in some angle supports for extra support so that there is not so much weight on the TS rails.
looking good. i think that some storage underneath would be a good idea. even just enough for some gear, bits and table saw inserts and the like should be good enough. thanks for the post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
874 Posts
Router Table #3: Putting in the plate and installing the fence...

So I got the Mast-R-Lift in place and did some tweaking of the leveler screws to get it flush with the top.

Photobucket

Next I needed to think about the fence. I know that I will be able to use my TS fence, but I have this Rockler fence floating around from my old drill press table. As far as I can tell, this is the same as their router table fence just a little smaller. I think it will work fine for my purposes and I can always modify it later if need be. Here I routed the channel for the T bolts that mount the fence.

Photobucket

Normally I would rout a larger channel on the bottom to not allow the T bolt to turn. But once I laid out the lines I realized that it is close enough to the edge so that the side piece will trap the T bolts. This was great and allowed me to just rout one channel in a few passes and I was set to go.

Photobucket

Finally, I attached the dust collection to the fence from the drill press set up. I mounted the router and made a few test cuts and I think this fence will serve my needs very well. This is a major step up from my old table as I had one of those Router Workshop set ups.

Photobucket

I have drawn up some preliminary plans for a "cabinet" of sorts that will allow me minimal bit storage but mostly it will enclose my router and allow for some dust collection. I will probably build in some angle supports for extra support so that there is not so much weight on the TS rails.
Very nice addition. How do you like the Rockler adjustable plate?
 

·
In Loving Memory
Joined
·
10,319 Posts
Router Table #3: Putting in the plate and installing the fence...

So I got the Mast-R-Lift in place and did some tweaking of the leveler screws to get it flush with the top.

Photobucket

Next I needed to think about the fence. I know that I will be able to use my TS fence, but I have this Rockler fence floating around from my old drill press table. As far as I can tell, this is the same as their router table fence just a little smaller. I think it will work fine for my purposes and I can always modify it later if need be. Here I routed the channel for the T bolts that mount the fence.

Photobucket

Normally I would rout a larger channel on the bottom to not allow the T bolt to turn. But once I laid out the lines I realized that it is close enough to the edge so that the side piece will trap the T bolts. This was great and allowed me to just rout one channel in a few passes and I was set to go.

Photobucket

Finally, I attached the dust collection to the fence from the drill press set up. I mounted the router and made a few test cuts and I think this fence will serve my needs very well. This is a major step up from my old table as I had one of those Router Workshop set ups.

Photobucket

I have drawn up some preliminary plans for a "cabinet" of sorts that will allow me minimal bit storage but mostly it will enclose my router and allow for some dust collection. I will probably build in some angle supports for extra support so that there is not so much weight on the TS rails.
I had an older Mast-R-Lift with a belt. I got rid of it because the belt skipped teeth.

Nice job on the table.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top