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I have the Grizzly G0572 Hanging Air Filter w/Remote and it works great for me. Plus it hangs from the ceiling and is out of my way. It pumps 1044 CFM on high and the timers are great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the reply, agreed about the general consensus on the JDS. I bought one last week at Woodcraft, during their 10% off sale. Final price was ~$305. I'm using it the same way, running it while in the shop, then using the timer for an hour or so after I leave, nice feature. Mine's hanging from the ceiling right next to the DC and amid the table saw, jointer, planer location. I can reach the control panel on mine, so I don't need the remote, though for some installations I'm sure it's a real help.

Dan
 

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You could make your own for a lot less.
It's just a nest of filters with a fan system pulling air through it.
I made one for about $25.00 five years ago and it's still going strong.

There's a furnace filter to catch the big stuff and some remay cloth to catch the fines. I just toss them out as they get plugged up.
I have obtained 3 -5" CPU fans from and old computer system and will be installing them shortly to get rid of the bigger blower.
A 24 hour timer turns it on for 2 hours every day to sweep the air in the space.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Bob - Looks like an interesting design. The JDS has an electrostatic pre-filter + a bag type filter rated to remove 91% of particles in the 1 micron range, which are the ones said to pose the greatest health risk. I've seen people simply tape a furnace filter to a box fan. Such a setup is probably better than nothing, and will likely catch a lot of the larger "nuisance dust", but unless you build one with the same level of filter elements found in the better commercial units (the filters alone cost about 50 bucks each) I think it's unlikely you're eliminating the more dangerous bits.

Given what I spent on the machines that make the dust, $300 to protect my lungs seems like a small investment to me.

Dan
 

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I have to agree with you in principal Dan.

The reality is that the electrostatic filter can do just what they say .

I have one on my forced air furnace in my home.
By the same token, the ultra fine remay ( spun polyester) cloth I use has a filtration very similar to that of the elctrostatic device and saves me the time the trouble of having to take it out and spray it down with water , let it day and reinstall it.
I simply cut another sheet of polyester cloth and dispose of the old one.
It takes about 30 seconds. the furnace filter just asctas a baffle to slow the particles down so they adhere to the cloth.
The cloth I am using comes from a dress making store and costs me about 50 cents a yard.

If you look close you can see a piece of it clinging to the front in the thrd picture box down.
Cheers

Bob
 

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I wanted to update this conversation with an actual photo of the non woven cloth used for trapping dust particles in my shop.
The material on the left was in use for about a month. The material on the right is new .
a href="http://picasaweb.google.com/boboswin/MyWoodfolder/photo#5231052682092779890">
</a>
I'm very pleased with the efficiency of this inexpensive solution and how easy it is to maintain.
These are the case fans(CPU FANS) I mentioned above . They are quite plentiful on the net and extremely quiet.

Bob
 

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One of the forums discussing dust collection, was suggesting that the air scrubber type dust filter spreads around the dust that it can't catch.
I certainly can't argue with that but it does sound like a bad design and lack of understanding of what needs to happen.
There are many circumstances, in an active shop where it's virtually impossible to catch all the dust at the source and that's something that this fellow fails to grasp.

Anyway, he went to explain that whatever he had bought for a dust scrubber was sucking dust out of the air from the front of the machine and apparently blowing it right back out the back.
If that is the case with the scrubber you're currently using, I would suggest you analyze the filters in the unit and try to come up with a pre-filter with a fine enough mesh to trap the dust before it makes circuit around your shop.

As Lee Jesberger pointed out earlier, by actually disturbing the dust that has settled in the wood shop, and getting it airborne again allows the scrubber an opportunity to remove it from the ambient air. As most of you realize having spent some hours in your own shop the fine dust has an amazing way of finding itself into every nook and cranny of your operation.

By mobilizing these fines and putting your dust collector(scrubber) on a timer, you can scrub most of the area clean in the period of a few hours use and when you're not in there too!

It's not perfect but running without one is a poor subsitiute for good shop hygeine.

I did not mention helmets but they can provide some protection but at the expense of your comfort and are bulky to wear and hevey on your neck muscle after a few hours.

Cheers
Bob
 

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Barry, the "muffin" fans were selected to be run continous when I'm in the shop and produce a low DB.
I have a mid size squirrel cage that will be running on a timer when I'm out of the shop and I want vloume and noise is not a concern.
Venting the return air into the main DC dusting will eliminate having to have a make up air unit like a Hoyme damper for instance.

Bob
 

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Right.
You have to remember that most ot the dust collection occurs prior to the air leaving the filters.
Some say that the exiting ari causes the ambient dust to circulate around the room.
By directing the air into the DC pipes this turbulence is all but eliminated.

Bob
 

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http://lumberjocks.com/topics/3888#
I've got a pretty large shop in an old building, lot's of beams overhead. It measures 50ft. X 50ft.X 14ft. So about 35,000 cubic ft. The largest units I've found so far say they handle 3200 cu/ft per 2 minutes. Does that mean that two of them would handle 6400 and take roughly 5 times longer to clean the air? I'm anxious to get something so If anyone has a better idea I'm all ears (and eyes).
 

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Can someone offer insight into the production delay of the JDS system. It appears they are not available until May. I was encouraged by Fireball's review and settled on the unit he recommended only to find out it is delayed or out of stock at every retailer.
 

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I too am waiting on JDS to build stocks of their air cleaner.

If you look at their web site they have pictures of their air filter. Internally it resembles the bag house of an industrial air cleaner. It has deep tubes of filter material which should do a great job in removing fine particulates. Other brands have similar filter designs but not as large as the JDS. One note on the passive electrostatic (as opposed to active electrostatic filters which use high voltage power supplies to charge the dust particles) filters used by JDS and others: all passive electrostatic filter materials depend on a dry environment (less than 20% RH) to work. A rule of thumb - if you are getting shocked by light switches, its dry. High humidity levels essentially "short out" the electret materials in the filter however the 3M Filtrete (the most popular passive electrostatic media) material remains a very good mechanical filter media. None of this invalidates the performance of the JDS or others using passive electrostatic filtering just those in humid areas will not get quite the same performance.

One thing about JDS; it is an American company whose customers seem to be a pretty happy bunch. I don't know about you but I am making a concerted effort to buy American products. What's concerted? Be willing to pay more for American products on in this case wait till they sort out their manufacturing issues and ship to their distributors. If we don't demonstrate that there is a sizable market that avoids imports perhaps those introducing new products will think twice before pulling the PRC trigger. A visit to European countries will reveal many craftsmen who wouldn't consider buying tools that Americans are buying by the container full. I fault the many US companies that have outsourced the manufacture of many tools that not so long ago were made in the US but they would have never carried it off if it hadn't been for their willing accomplices. I know in some cases there aren't US equivalents. In such cases seek more friendly sources such as Germany, Japan and Taiwan. Just recently I finally bit the bullet and bought my first Festool after agonizing over the price. Once in use I realized that that the tool (track saw) was far better than the alternatives and the time saved quickly paid for the higher price. When you look closely at the Dewalt competitor for a $100 less you realize that the difference in value is far more than the $100 in cost.

Those that attempt to make their own filter using stacked A/C filters will obviously pull something out of the air but it wouldn't be comparable. There is a sneaky alternative: buy a JDS pleated filter for $50 and build an air cleaner around it. With careful design you would get something that would work nearly as well.
 
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