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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Building the carcass

The following is an example of a project that I usually will find myself working on. It also highlights one of the reasons why I don't post projects, as these are usually rough constructions that I attempt to make a little better than the material I am working with. Right now, my house is in a state of semi-chaos. My brother has moved in a few months ago (he has been recently diagnosed with MS and is trying to get his life together) and so I have been trying to adjust to the addition of his things on top of my things and so my furniture plans will be postponed for awhile.

Much of my woodworking time is spent on making things for other people. I have a lot of junk wood and I have a number of friends who will consider buying some "throw away" item at a big store and will usually talk to me first. If they can get me to throw something together, then they save a few bucks and some of my junk wood is put to use. I used to beg off on some of these projects and I didn't want to put in the time, effort, tool use on throw away crap. I got into this hobby because I wanted to build quality up, not turn into another landfill provider. But then I realized that, not only was I turning my back on a friend, I was also turning down experience points that could hone my skills. And since nobody cares what the end product looks like, the pressure of perfection is off and I am not learning my chops on expensive wood. Besides, not like the Queen of England is going to come by anytime soon and require my services, so nothing to lose :)

Most times these requests are for something quick. They want it right now and don't want me to mess with any process that is "fancy." I will accommodate the speed but will make the demand that I employ my skills or I won't do it. I can skip the finish and the profile routing, I can cancel the finish sanding, but I will not just nail two boards together because I have no interest in practicing how to be a lousy carpenter :) If you practice bad craftsmanship, you will become a poor craftsman. What follows is such a request.

I have a friend whose collection of shoes is becoming a pile in the back of her closet. She asked me for a cardboard box to put them in and I told her I could probably throw together a shoe rack for the back of her closet if that would help. I seen a beautiful one by another one of the jocks here. Though this one would not match the beauty, it provides the inspiration for the practicality. I had some pieces of old plywood given to me (by the same friend) that were sitting in a church shed for a number of years and were going to be thrown away. Some of the pieces were painted a very dark blue. Some had rot on the edges and had areas on the face that were chipped. I drew out the measurements, used my own shoes as a reference point, and trimmed, cut, dadoed and rabbeted. Producing the carcass you see below -



No beauty queen right? Practical but nothing to write home about and it pretty much looks like something a monkey can make (albeit maybe a smart one with pretty hair..) But lets take a closer look, shall we, and look past the aesthetics and move on to the joinery itself.



What skills were employed here and what was learned from the project so far?

1. Dado cutting - Dados had to be properly measured to accomodate spacial requirements. measurements of the side pieces were 6 inches to each side of Dado. Fences set for required placement and both side pieces cut at the same time for uniformity. Use of calipers to determine proper thickness of piece to fit in slots. Measurements transferred to stack dado set to make a more educated assumption of spacers and cutters needed. Test cuts to verify proper fit.

2. Rabbeting - Space between ends measured to determine beginning points of Rabbets on both ends to allow a tight fit between boards. Playing card thickness added to the distance between fence and blade so that the edges of the Rabbet would slightly protrude from the piece. This allows one to use a trim router to mat the edges perfectly where a Rabbet cut too short would leave noticeable gaps at the edges. Create the error you can fix so that you can avoid the error that you can't, or would require more effort to repair.

3. Assembly - Manufacture right angle clamp jigs to insure shelf is at a proper 90 degree angle in correlation to the sides. Use thin bead of glue inside dado and along the edge of the shelf board and distribute evenly with a brush. Align shelf edge so that edge is matted evenly, apply angle jigs and clamp, followed by clamping the carcass so that all boards are square and joinery is snug. Tap in 4 brads into the top of the carcass to keep rabbets tight and to reduce amount of clamps required.

So there you have it. Good practice on a number of different woodworking skills. It helps a friend out, saves wood from the landfill, and also postpones the purchase of nother landfill item from a big name store. My friend is happy with the concept, so now she wants me to take it a bit further and pretty it up. Instead of the back of the closet, she wants in her entryway. So the next set will involve fixing some of the cracked plywood, making a face frame to cover the edges, and sanding and priming it for whatever color she wants it to be. No pressure, as it can only look better than how it looks now and there will be a nice batch of skillsets to practice on. Then, when the Queen of England does employ my services, I will be ready ;)

Thanks for reading,

David
 

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Building the carcass

The following is an example of a project that I usually will find myself working on. It also highlights one of the reasons why I don't post projects, as these are usually rough constructions that I attempt to make a little better than the material I am working with. Right now, my house is in a state of semi-chaos. My brother has moved in a few months ago (he has been recently diagnosed with MS and is trying to get his life together) and so I have been trying to adjust to the addition of his things on top of my things and so my furniture plans will be postponed for awhile.

Much of my woodworking time is spent on making things for other people. I have a lot of junk wood and I have a number of friends who will consider buying some "throw away" item at a big store and will usually talk to me first. If they can get me to throw something together, then they save a few bucks and some of my junk wood is put to use. I used to beg off on some of these projects and I didn't want to put in the time, effort, tool use on throw away crap. I got into this hobby because I wanted to build quality up, not turn into another landfill provider. But then I realized that, not only was I turning my back on a friend, I was also turning down experience points that could hone my skills. And since nobody cares what the end product looks like, the pressure of perfection is off and I am not learning my chops on expensive wood. Besides, not like the Queen of England is going to come by anytime soon and require my services, so nothing to lose :)

Most times these requests are for something quick. They want it right now and don't want me to mess with any process that is "fancy." I will accommodate the speed but will make the demand that I employ my skills or I won't do it. I can skip the finish and the profile routing, I can cancel the finish sanding, but I will not just nail two boards together because I have no interest in practicing how to be a lousy carpenter :) If you practice bad craftsmanship, you will become a poor craftsman. What follows is such a request.

I have a friend whose collection of shoes is becoming a pile in the back of her closet. She asked me for a cardboard box to put them in and I told her I could probably throw together a shoe rack for the back of her closet if that would help. I seen a beautiful one by another one of the jocks here. Though this one would not match the beauty, it provides the inspiration for the practicality. I had some pieces of old plywood given to me (by the same friend) that were sitting in a church shed for a number of years and were going to be thrown away. Some of the pieces were painted a very dark blue. Some had rot on the edges and had areas on the face that were chipped. I drew out the measurements, used my own shoes as a reference point, and trimmed, cut, dadoed and rabbeted. Producing the carcass you see below -



No beauty queen right? Practical but nothing to write home about and it pretty much looks like something a monkey can make (albeit maybe a smart one with pretty hair..) But lets take a closer look, shall we, and look past the aesthetics and move on to the joinery itself.



What skills were employed here and what was learned from the project so far?

1. Dado cutting - Dados had to be properly measured to accomodate spacial requirements. measurements of the side pieces were 6 inches to each side of Dado. Fences set for required placement and both side pieces cut at the same time for uniformity. Use of calipers to determine proper thickness of piece to fit in slots. Measurements transferred to stack dado set to make a more educated assumption of spacers and cutters needed. Test cuts to verify proper fit.

2. Rabbeting - Space between ends measured to determine beginning points of Rabbets on both ends to allow a tight fit between boards. Playing card thickness added to the distance between fence and blade so that the edges of the Rabbet would slightly protrude from the piece. This allows one to use a trim router to mat the edges perfectly where a Rabbet cut too short would leave noticeable gaps at the edges. Create the error you can fix so that you can avoid the error that you can't, or would require more effort to repair.

3. Assembly - Manufacture right angle clamp jigs to insure shelf is at a proper 90 degree angle in correlation to the sides. Use thin bead of glue inside dado and along the edge of the shelf board and distribute evenly with a brush. Align shelf edge so that edge is matted evenly, apply angle jigs and clamp, followed by clamping the carcass so that all boards are square and joinery is snug. Tap in 4 brads into the top of the carcass to keep rabbets tight and to reduce amount of clamps required.

So there you have it. Good practice on a number of different woodworking skills. It helps a friend out, saves wood from the landfill, and also postpones the purchase of nother landfill item from a big name store. My friend is happy with the concept, so now she wants me to take it a bit further and pretty it up. Instead of the back of the closet, she wants in her entryway. So the next set will involve fixing some of the cracked plywood, making a face frame to cover the edges, and sanding and priming it for whatever color she wants it to be. No pressure, as it can only look better than how it looks now and there will be a nice batch of skillsets to practice on. Then, when the Queen of England does employ my services, I will be ready ;)

Thanks for reading,

David
Nice way to explain it. Some of my projects are nothing more than my learning how to use a tool or how to do a particular function. I am always happy when those tests turn out nice, but I am also a realist.
 

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Building the carcass

The following is an example of a project that I usually will find myself working on. It also highlights one of the reasons why I don't post projects, as these are usually rough constructions that I attempt to make a little better than the material I am working with. Right now, my house is in a state of semi-chaos. My brother has moved in a few months ago (he has been recently diagnosed with MS and is trying to get his life together) and so I have been trying to adjust to the addition of his things on top of my things and so my furniture plans will be postponed for awhile.

Much of my woodworking time is spent on making things for other people. I have a lot of junk wood and I have a number of friends who will consider buying some "throw away" item at a big store and will usually talk to me first. If they can get me to throw something together, then they save a few bucks and some of my junk wood is put to use. I used to beg off on some of these projects and I didn't want to put in the time, effort, tool use on throw away crap. I got into this hobby because I wanted to build quality up, not turn into another landfill provider. But then I realized that, not only was I turning my back on a friend, I was also turning down experience points that could hone my skills. And since nobody cares what the end product looks like, the pressure of perfection is off and I am not learning my chops on expensive wood. Besides, not like the Queen of England is going to come by anytime soon and require my services, so nothing to lose :)

Most times these requests are for something quick. They want it right now and don't want me to mess with any process that is "fancy." I will accommodate the speed but will make the demand that I employ my skills or I won't do it. I can skip the finish and the profile routing, I can cancel the finish sanding, but I will not just nail two boards together because I have no interest in practicing how to be a lousy carpenter :) If you practice bad craftsmanship, you will become a poor craftsman. What follows is such a request.

I have a friend whose collection of shoes is becoming a pile in the back of her closet. She asked me for a cardboard box to put them in and I told her I could probably throw together a shoe rack for the back of her closet if that would help. I seen a beautiful one by another one of the jocks here. Though this one would not match the beauty, it provides the inspiration for the practicality. I had some pieces of old plywood given to me (by the same friend) that were sitting in a church shed for a number of years and were going to be thrown away. Some of the pieces were painted a very dark blue. Some had rot on the edges and had areas on the face that were chipped. I drew out the measurements, used my own shoes as a reference point, and trimmed, cut, dadoed and rabbeted. Producing the carcass you see below -



No beauty queen right? Practical but nothing to write home about and it pretty much looks like something a monkey can make (albeit maybe a smart one with pretty hair..) But lets take a closer look, shall we, and look past the aesthetics and move on to the joinery itself.



What skills were employed here and what was learned from the project so far?

1. Dado cutting - Dados had to be properly measured to accomodate spacial requirements. measurements of the side pieces were 6 inches to each side of Dado. Fences set for required placement and both side pieces cut at the same time for uniformity. Use of calipers to determine proper thickness of piece to fit in slots. Measurements transferred to stack dado set to make a more educated assumption of spacers and cutters needed. Test cuts to verify proper fit.

2. Rabbeting - Space between ends measured to determine beginning points of Rabbets on both ends to allow a tight fit between boards. Playing card thickness added to the distance between fence and blade so that the edges of the Rabbet would slightly protrude from the piece. This allows one to use a trim router to mat the edges perfectly where a Rabbet cut too short would leave noticeable gaps at the edges. Create the error you can fix so that you can avoid the error that you can't, or would require more effort to repair.

3. Assembly - Manufacture right angle clamp jigs to insure shelf is at a proper 90 degree angle in correlation to the sides. Use thin bead of glue inside dado and along the edge of the shelf board and distribute evenly with a brush. Align shelf edge so that edge is matted evenly, apply angle jigs and clamp, followed by clamping the carcass so that all boards are square and joinery is snug. Tap in 4 brads into the top of the carcass to keep rabbets tight and to reduce amount of clamps required.

So there you have it. Good practice on a number of different woodworking skills. It helps a friend out, saves wood from the landfill, and also postpones the purchase of nother landfill item from a big name store. My friend is happy with the concept, so now she wants me to take it a bit further and pretty it up. Instead of the back of the closet, she wants in her entryway. So the next set will involve fixing some of the cracked plywood, making a face frame to cover the edges, and sanding and priming it for whatever color she wants it to be. No pressure, as it can only look better than how it looks now and there will be a nice batch of skillsets to practice on. Then, when the Queen of England does employ my services, I will be ready ;)

Thanks for reading,

David
David
I do a lot of stuff like that also. Looking at my blog and my last little tote for example Measurement Instrument Tote, I made precise dados with tolerances such that the piece would stand up with press fit alone. Of course I glued them, and used small brads in the construction, because it was a shop piece. I find I use it constantly, and even put another set of mounting holes for it on the back of my RAS table just before I left on vacation. I also put Sketchup to use, and applied some 'form follows function techniques'. This is one of my more carefully designed pieces, as opposed to precision construction.

The next little project was the oven thermometer case. I have subsequently use the thermometer more than expected, and the case makes finding it and storing it easy. Again, it required very precise measurement and dado work, in this case with the table saw. Then I used plastic for the top, experimenting with the material, and relearning plastic gluing (I didn't do very well on this one) so that I can use some of the same techniques in a tool rack I am designing, for chisels and other sets of miscellaneous tools. Simple quick projects, but built with precision and learning and relearning techniques and material properties.

If you notice, I do not have any projects listed either…........

......and remember the quick and dirty Danish oil finish….................

Ain't doing this type of stuff fun?................(-:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Building the carcass

The following is an example of a project that I usually will find myself working on. It also highlights one of the reasons why I don't post projects, as these are usually rough constructions that I attempt to make a little better than the material I am working with. Right now, my house is in a state of semi-chaos. My brother has moved in a few months ago (he has been recently diagnosed with MS and is trying to get his life together) and so I have been trying to adjust to the addition of his things on top of my things and so my furniture plans will be postponed for awhile.

Much of my woodworking time is spent on making things for other people. I have a lot of junk wood and I have a number of friends who will consider buying some "throw away" item at a big store and will usually talk to me first. If they can get me to throw something together, then they save a few bucks and some of my junk wood is put to use. I used to beg off on some of these projects and I didn't want to put in the time, effort, tool use on throw away crap. I got into this hobby because I wanted to build quality up, not turn into another landfill provider. But then I realized that, not only was I turning my back on a friend, I was also turning down experience points that could hone my skills. And since nobody cares what the end product looks like, the pressure of perfection is off and I am not learning my chops on expensive wood. Besides, not like the Queen of England is going to come by anytime soon and require my services, so nothing to lose :)

Most times these requests are for something quick. They want it right now and don't want me to mess with any process that is "fancy." I will accommodate the speed but will make the demand that I employ my skills or I won't do it. I can skip the finish and the profile routing, I can cancel the finish sanding, but I will not just nail two boards together because I have no interest in practicing how to be a lousy carpenter :) If you practice bad craftsmanship, you will become a poor craftsman. What follows is such a request.

I have a friend whose collection of shoes is becoming a pile in the back of her closet. She asked me for a cardboard box to put them in and I told her I could probably throw together a shoe rack for the back of her closet if that would help. I seen a beautiful one by another one of the jocks here. Though this one would not match the beauty, it provides the inspiration for the practicality. I had some pieces of old plywood given to me (by the same friend) that were sitting in a church shed for a number of years and were going to be thrown away. Some of the pieces were painted a very dark blue. Some had rot on the edges and had areas on the face that were chipped. I drew out the measurements, used my own shoes as a reference point, and trimmed, cut, dadoed and rabbeted. Producing the carcass you see below -



No beauty queen right? Practical but nothing to write home about and it pretty much looks like something a monkey can make (albeit maybe a smart one with pretty hair..) But lets take a closer look, shall we, and look past the aesthetics and move on to the joinery itself.



What skills were employed here and what was learned from the project so far?

1. Dado cutting - Dados had to be properly measured to accomodate spacial requirements. measurements of the side pieces were 6 inches to each side of Dado. Fences set for required placement and both side pieces cut at the same time for uniformity. Use of calipers to determine proper thickness of piece to fit in slots. Measurements transferred to stack dado set to make a more educated assumption of spacers and cutters needed. Test cuts to verify proper fit.

2. Rabbeting - Space between ends measured to determine beginning points of Rabbets on both ends to allow a tight fit between boards. Playing card thickness added to the distance between fence and blade so that the edges of the Rabbet would slightly protrude from the piece. This allows one to use a trim router to mat the edges perfectly where a Rabbet cut too short would leave noticeable gaps at the edges. Create the error you can fix so that you can avoid the error that you can't, or would require more effort to repair.

3. Assembly - Manufacture right angle clamp jigs to insure shelf is at a proper 90 degree angle in correlation to the sides. Use thin bead of glue inside dado and along the edge of the shelf board and distribute evenly with a brush. Align shelf edge so that edge is matted evenly, apply angle jigs and clamp, followed by clamping the carcass so that all boards are square and joinery is snug. Tap in 4 brads into the top of the carcass to keep rabbets tight and to reduce amount of clamps required.

So there you have it. Good practice on a number of different woodworking skills. It helps a friend out, saves wood from the landfill, and also postpones the purchase of nother landfill item from a big name store. My friend is happy with the concept, so now she wants me to take it a bit further and pretty it up. Instead of the back of the closet, she wants in her entryway. So the next set will involve fixing some of the cracked plywood, making a face frame to cover the edges, and sanding and priming it for whatever color she wants it to be. No pressure, as it can only look better than how it looks now and there will be a nice batch of skillsets to practice on. Then, when the Queen of England does employ my services, I will be ready ;)

Thanks for reading,

David
Thanks for the comments gentlemen. I appreciate the read and feedback.

Jim, I took a look at your items. Nice work and quite useful for the shop. The oven thermometer case looks pretty slick. I wouldn't take that to the airport though when heading out on one of your Maui excursions :) I would really hate to see a picture of you in the paper with you quoted as screaming "I am not Al Qaeda you idiots, I am a Lumberjock!"

Yes, the projects are fun, it gets me in the shop, and keeps me working my tools. Until I can change my circumstance, good idea to just change my perspective.

David
 

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Building the carcass

The following is an example of a project that I usually will find myself working on. It also highlights one of the reasons why I don't post projects, as these are usually rough constructions that I attempt to make a little better than the material I am working with. Right now, my house is in a state of semi-chaos. My brother has moved in a few months ago (he has been recently diagnosed with MS and is trying to get his life together) and so I have been trying to adjust to the addition of his things on top of my things and so my furniture plans will be postponed for awhile.

Much of my woodworking time is spent on making things for other people. I have a lot of junk wood and I have a number of friends who will consider buying some "throw away" item at a big store and will usually talk to me first. If they can get me to throw something together, then they save a few bucks and some of my junk wood is put to use. I used to beg off on some of these projects and I didn't want to put in the time, effort, tool use on throw away crap. I got into this hobby because I wanted to build quality up, not turn into another landfill provider. But then I realized that, not only was I turning my back on a friend, I was also turning down experience points that could hone my skills. And since nobody cares what the end product looks like, the pressure of perfection is off and I am not learning my chops on expensive wood. Besides, not like the Queen of England is going to come by anytime soon and require my services, so nothing to lose :)

Most times these requests are for something quick. They want it right now and don't want me to mess with any process that is "fancy." I will accommodate the speed but will make the demand that I employ my skills or I won't do it. I can skip the finish and the profile routing, I can cancel the finish sanding, but I will not just nail two boards together because I have no interest in practicing how to be a lousy carpenter :) If you practice bad craftsmanship, you will become a poor craftsman. What follows is such a request.

I have a friend whose collection of shoes is becoming a pile in the back of her closet. She asked me for a cardboard box to put them in and I told her I could probably throw together a shoe rack for the back of her closet if that would help. I seen a beautiful one by another one of the jocks here. Though this one would not match the beauty, it provides the inspiration for the practicality. I had some pieces of old plywood given to me (by the same friend) that were sitting in a church shed for a number of years and were going to be thrown away. Some of the pieces were painted a very dark blue. Some had rot on the edges and had areas on the face that were chipped. I drew out the measurements, used my own shoes as a reference point, and trimmed, cut, dadoed and rabbeted. Producing the carcass you see below -



No beauty queen right? Practical but nothing to write home about and it pretty much looks like something a monkey can make (albeit maybe a smart one with pretty hair..) But lets take a closer look, shall we, and look past the aesthetics and move on to the joinery itself.



What skills were employed here and what was learned from the project so far?

1. Dado cutting - Dados had to be properly measured to accomodate spacial requirements. measurements of the side pieces were 6 inches to each side of Dado. Fences set for required placement and both side pieces cut at the same time for uniformity. Use of calipers to determine proper thickness of piece to fit in slots. Measurements transferred to stack dado set to make a more educated assumption of spacers and cutters needed. Test cuts to verify proper fit.

2. Rabbeting - Space between ends measured to determine beginning points of Rabbets on both ends to allow a tight fit between boards. Playing card thickness added to the distance between fence and blade so that the edges of the Rabbet would slightly protrude from the piece. This allows one to use a trim router to mat the edges perfectly where a Rabbet cut too short would leave noticeable gaps at the edges. Create the error you can fix so that you can avoid the error that you can't, or would require more effort to repair.

3. Assembly - Manufacture right angle clamp jigs to insure shelf is at a proper 90 degree angle in correlation to the sides. Use thin bead of glue inside dado and along the edge of the shelf board and distribute evenly with a brush. Align shelf edge so that edge is matted evenly, apply angle jigs and clamp, followed by clamping the carcass so that all boards are square and joinery is snug. Tap in 4 brads into the top of the carcass to keep rabbets tight and to reduce amount of clamps required.

So there you have it. Good practice on a number of different woodworking skills. It helps a friend out, saves wood from the landfill, and also postpones the purchase of nother landfill item from a big name store. My friend is happy with the concept, so now she wants me to take it a bit further and pretty it up. Instead of the back of the closet, she wants in her entryway. So the next set will involve fixing some of the cracked plywood, making a face frame to cover the edges, and sanding and priming it for whatever color she wants it to be. No pressure, as it can only look better than how it looks now and there will be a nice batch of skillsets to practice on. Then, when the Queen of England does employ my services, I will be ready ;)

Thanks for reading,

David
David
That thermometer case is overkill, but like I said, my perfectly good 20 year old oven thermometer bit the dust just because it was stuffed in a drawer, and got broken from closing the drawer on it. On the other side, it only took me a couple of hours including the design and finishing. My only use for these gadgets is turkey, ham(just used it on one, we like the ones that aren't precooked), and prime rib. A large chicken could use it as well. But when you need one, you need it. You can't do guess work on any of those items and end up with good results. And I will remember your advice to not take it through the airport (-:

Thanks for the comments on my Maui pictures, glad people appreciate them. I put a little work into culling, cropping, and editing the pictures. Nothing more boring than a bunch of unselected vacation pictures. I don't have the best camera equipment, so I have to shoot a few views to get a usable one.

Jim
 

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Building the carcass

The following is an example of a project that I usually will find myself working on. It also highlights one of the reasons why I don't post projects, as these are usually rough constructions that I attempt to make a little better than the material I am working with. Right now, my house is in a state of semi-chaos. My brother has moved in a few months ago (he has been recently diagnosed with MS and is trying to get his life together) and so I have been trying to adjust to the addition of his things on top of my things and so my furniture plans will be postponed for awhile.

Much of my woodworking time is spent on making things for other people. I have a lot of junk wood and I have a number of friends who will consider buying some "throw away" item at a big store and will usually talk to me first. If they can get me to throw something together, then they save a few bucks and some of my junk wood is put to use. I used to beg off on some of these projects and I didn't want to put in the time, effort, tool use on throw away crap. I got into this hobby because I wanted to build quality up, not turn into another landfill provider. But then I realized that, not only was I turning my back on a friend, I was also turning down experience points that could hone my skills. And since nobody cares what the end product looks like, the pressure of perfection is off and I am not learning my chops on expensive wood. Besides, not like the Queen of England is going to come by anytime soon and require my services, so nothing to lose :)

Most times these requests are for something quick. They want it right now and don't want me to mess with any process that is "fancy." I will accommodate the speed but will make the demand that I employ my skills or I won't do it. I can skip the finish and the profile routing, I can cancel the finish sanding, but I will not just nail two boards together because I have no interest in practicing how to be a lousy carpenter :) If you practice bad craftsmanship, you will become a poor craftsman. What follows is such a request.

I have a friend whose collection of shoes is becoming a pile in the back of her closet. She asked me for a cardboard box to put them in and I told her I could probably throw together a shoe rack for the back of her closet if that would help. I seen a beautiful one by another one of the jocks here. Though this one would not match the beauty, it provides the inspiration for the practicality. I had some pieces of old plywood given to me (by the same friend) that were sitting in a church shed for a number of years and were going to be thrown away. Some of the pieces were painted a very dark blue. Some had rot on the edges and had areas on the face that were chipped. I drew out the measurements, used my own shoes as a reference point, and trimmed, cut, dadoed and rabbeted. Producing the carcass you see below -



No beauty queen right? Practical but nothing to write home about and it pretty much looks like something a monkey can make (albeit maybe a smart one with pretty hair..) But lets take a closer look, shall we, and look past the aesthetics and move on to the joinery itself.



What skills were employed here and what was learned from the project so far?

1. Dado cutting - Dados had to be properly measured to accomodate spacial requirements. measurements of the side pieces were 6 inches to each side of Dado. Fences set for required placement and both side pieces cut at the same time for uniformity. Use of calipers to determine proper thickness of piece to fit in slots. Measurements transferred to stack dado set to make a more educated assumption of spacers and cutters needed. Test cuts to verify proper fit.

2. Rabbeting - Space between ends measured to determine beginning points of Rabbets on both ends to allow a tight fit between boards. Playing card thickness added to the distance between fence and blade so that the edges of the Rabbet would slightly protrude from the piece. This allows one to use a trim router to mat the edges perfectly where a Rabbet cut too short would leave noticeable gaps at the edges. Create the error you can fix so that you can avoid the error that you can't, or would require more effort to repair.

3. Assembly - Manufacture right angle clamp jigs to insure shelf is at a proper 90 degree angle in correlation to the sides. Use thin bead of glue inside dado and along the edge of the shelf board and distribute evenly with a brush. Align shelf edge so that edge is matted evenly, apply angle jigs and clamp, followed by clamping the carcass so that all boards are square and joinery is snug. Tap in 4 brads into the top of the carcass to keep rabbets tight and to reduce amount of clamps required.

So there you have it. Good practice on a number of different woodworking skills. It helps a friend out, saves wood from the landfill, and also postpones the purchase of nother landfill item from a big name store. My friend is happy with the concept, so now she wants me to take it a bit further and pretty it up. Instead of the back of the closet, she wants in her entryway. So the next set will involve fixing some of the cracked plywood, making a face frame to cover the edges, and sanding and priming it for whatever color she wants it to be. No pressure, as it can only look better than how it looks now and there will be a nice batch of skillsets to practice on. Then, when the Queen of England does employ my services, I will be ready ;)

Thanks for reading,

David
I need one of those puppies
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Working on edging

For those that are just tuning in, this was originally a quick project for a friend to just have something to throw her shoes on. Crap wood was used, old plywood, nasty aged paint on some of the pieces and now she decided she wants it in the entryway so I have to try and figure out how to make it look halfway decent…

So now I have the carcass built, still needs some sanding and some repair of the cracked plywood areas. That will be remedied by a think layer of sawdust and glue. This will be painted and most of the flaws hidden. This is not a work of art, this is a practical project to hone and practice skills and practice some problem solving. It is my belief that a good woodworker can take some crappy pine and can make it look better. A poor woodworker can take some beautiful walnut and make it look like crappy pine. So while I have been honing my skills, I have been working with the poor stuff, salvaged and found wood.

So here is the task for today. I had to come up with something to hide the plywood edges.



Not very pretty… Even though painted, the edges will still look like plywood. So this is a good practice session on covering those up. Had I not already fastened the top, I could have built a face frame, which would have covered up most of the edges and just would have left the top edge which could have been covered by edge banding tape or molding. Unfortunately, the top is already fastened so no work with face frames today. I don't really want to do the edge banding, just makes it look like another box from Walmart and the goal of this is to make it look a little cooler than it looks right now. So, I went with the following plan. Cut a board to length. route the edge on the table router, then trim off the edging. Voila, instant molding. (And I thought Handyman magazine had no reason to nominate me to the Woodworkers Hall of Fame…)

I didn't go with anything fancy, just some cove edging. The cove would slim the top of the edge down so that there would be very little mixed wood where the plywood meets the board. I held up a piece just to give the general idea -



I will run it along the edges so that the open space is framed. This will not reduce the open space for the shoes to fit and, once mitered and trimmed, it will give a more appealing look.

Now why am I going through such pains to explain, step by step, a process where I am working with a crappy piece of wood in an effort to make a slightly above mediocre piece?

For one, this simple project covers a multitude of basic woodworking skills. It involves routing, sawing, dadoing, rabbeting, measuring, mitering, building a basic frame (which is the starting point of cabinetry, box building, bookcases, etc.) and most importantly, using your head to think through a problem then using your tools to make that thought a reality. And secondly, show other new people out there that not everyone out here is a lifelong woodworking guru. You all are fantastic people, modest, supportive, and very skilled. But I have to tell you all that, speaking from a newbie perspective, sometimes showing your work to you folks is like playing Mary Had a Little Lamb to Eric Clapton. So if there are other new people out there feeling a little intimidated, it doesn't hurt for them to know that there are others in the same boat who are practicing, experimenting, and starting at the beginning also.

I am happy with the couple hours I got to spend in the shop today. I felt good about working out a solution and putting the plan into motion. It may not be the most original, but it was a good exercise in problem solving and shaping the wood to meet the little vision in my head.

Thank you all for reading, and happy woodworking!

David
 

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Working on edging

For those that are just tuning in, this was originally a quick project for a friend to just have something to throw her shoes on. Crap wood was used, old plywood, nasty aged paint on some of the pieces and now she decided she wants it in the entryway so I have to try and figure out how to make it look halfway decent…

So now I have the carcass built, still needs some sanding and some repair of the cracked plywood areas. That will be remedied by a think layer of sawdust and glue. This will be painted and most of the flaws hidden. This is not a work of art, this is a practical project to hone and practice skills and practice some problem solving. It is my belief that a good woodworker can take some crappy pine and can make it look better. A poor woodworker can take some beautiful walnut and make it look like crappy pine. So while I have been honing my skills, I have been working with the poor stuff, salvaged and found wood.

So here is the task for today. I had to come up with something to hide the plywood edges.



Not very pretty… Even though painted, the edges will still look like plywood. So this is a good practice session on covering those up. Had I not already fastened the top, I could have built a face frame, which would have covered up most of the edges and just would have left the top edge which could have been covered by edge banding tape or molding. Unfortunately, the top is already fastened so no work with face frames today. I don't really want to do the edge banding, just makes it look like another box from Walmart and the goal of this is to make it look a little cooler than it looks right now. So, I went with the following plan. Cut a board to length. route the edge on the table router, then trim off the edging. Voila, instant molding. (And I thought Handyman magazine had no reason to nominate me to the Woodworkers Hall of Fame…)

I didn't go with anything fancy, just some cove edging. The cove would slim the top of the edge down so that there would be very little mixed wood where the plywood meets the board. I held up a piece just to give the general idea -



I will run it along the edges so that the open space is framed. This will not reduce the open space for the shoes to fit and, once mitered and trimmed, it will give a more appealing look.

Now why am I going through such pains to explain, step by step, a process where I am working with a crappy piece of wood in an effort to make a slightly above mediocre piece?

For one, this simple project covers a multitude of basic woodworking skills. It involves routing, sawing, dadoing, rabbeting, measuring, mitering, building a basic frame (which is the starting point of cabinetry, box building, bookcases, etc.) and most importantly, using your head to think through a problem then using your tools to make that thought a reality. And secondly, show other new people out there that not everyone out here is a lifelong woodworking guru. You all are fantastic people, modest, supportive, and very skilled. But I have to tell you all that, speaking from a newbie perspective, sometimes showing your work to you folks is like playing Mary Had a Little Lamb to Eric Clapton. So if there are other new people out there feeling a little intimidated, it doesn't hurt for them to know that there are others in the same boat who are practicing, experimenting, and starting at the beginning also.

I am happy with the couple hours I got to spend in the shop today. I felt good about working out a solution and putting the plan into motion. It may not be the most original, but it was a good exercise in problem solving and shaping the wood to meet the little vision in my head.

Thank you all for reading, and happy woodworking!

David
A great project and the edging trim work looks very nicely profiled. Looking forward to seeing it completed.

p/s….your shop made clamping square from wood ply looks very nice!
 

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Working on edging

For those that are just tuning in, this was originally a quick project for a friend to just have something to throw her shoes on. Crap wood was used, old plywood, nasty aged paint on some of the pieces and now she decided she wants it in the entryway so I have to try and figure out how to make it look halfway decent…

So now I have the carcass built, still needs some sanding and some repair of the cracked plywood areas. That will be remedied by a think layer of sawdust and glue. This will be painted and most of the flaws hidden. This is not a work of art, this is a practical project to hone and practice skills and practice some problem solving. It is my belief that a good woodworker can take some crappy pine and can make it look better. A poor woodworker can take some beautiful walnut and make it look like crappy pine. So while I have been honing my skills, I have been working with the poor stuff, salvaged and found wood.

So here is the task for today. I had to come up with something to hide the plywood edges.



Not very pretty… Even though painted, the edges will still look like plywood. So this is a good practice session on covering those up. Had I not already fastened the top, I could have built a face frame, which would have covered up most of the edges and just would have left the top edge which could have been covered by edge banding tape or molding. Unfortunately, the top is already fastened so no work with face frames today. I don't really want to do the edge banding, just makes it look like another box from Walmart and the goal of this is to make it look a little cooler than it looks right now. So, I went with the following plan. Cut a board to length. route the edge on the table router, then trim off the edging. Voila, instant molding. (And I thought Handyman magazine had no reason to nominate me to the Woodworkers Hall of Fame…)

I didn't go with anything fancy, just some cove edging. The cove would slim the top of the edge down so that there would be very little mixed wood where the plywood meets the board. I held up a piece just to give the general idea -



I will run it along the edges so that the open space is framed. This will not reduce the open space for the shoes to fit and, once mitered and trimmed, it will give a more appealing look.

Now why am I going through such pains to explain, step by step, a process where I am working with a crappy piece of wood in an effort to make a slightly above mediocre piece?

For one, this simple project covers a multitude of basic woodworking skills. It involves routing, sawing, dadoing, rabbeting, measuring, mitering, building a basic frame (which is the starting point of cabinetry, box building, bookcases, etc.) and most importantly, using your head to think through a problem then using your tools to make that thought a reality. And secondly, show other new people out there that not everyone out here is a lifelong woodworking guru. You all are fantastic people, modest, supportive, and very skilled. But I have to tell you all that, speaking from a newbie perspective, sometimes showing your work to you folks is like playing Mary Had a Little Lamb to Eric Clapton. So if there are other new people out there feeling a little intimidated, it doesn't hurt for them to know that there are others in the same boat who are practicing, experimenting, and starting at the beginning also.

I am happy with the couple hours I got to spend in the shop today. I felt good about working out a solution and putting the plan into motion. It may not be the most original, but it was a good exercise in problem solving and shaping the wood to meet the little vision in my head.

Thank you all for reading, and happy woodworking!

David
Now you know how it is
when you desided to enter the hall of fame
you get the demands and trouble

Dennis
 

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Working on edging

For those that are just tuning in, this was originally a quick project for a friend to just have something to throw her shoes on. Crap wood was used, old plywood, nasty aged paint on some of the pieces and now she decided she wants it in the entryway so I have to try and figure out how to make it look halfway decent…

So now I have the carcass built, still needs some sanding and some repair of the cracked plywood areas. That will be remedied by a think layer of sawdust and glue. This will be painted and most of the flaws hidden. This is not a work of art, this is a practical project to hone and practice skills and practice some problem solving. It is my belief that a good woodworker can take some crappy pine and can make it look better. A poor woodworker can take some beautiful walnut and make it look like crappy pine. So while I have been honing my skills, I have been working with the poor stuff, salvaged and found wood.

So here is the task for today. I had to come up with something to hide the plywood edges.



Not very pretty… Even though painted, the edges will still look like plywood. So this is a good practice session on covering those up. Had I not already fastened the top, I could have built a face frame, which would have covered up most of the edges and just would have left the top edge which could have been covered by edge banding tape or molding. Unfortunately, the top is already fastened so no work with face frames today. I don't really want to do the edge banding, just makes it look like another box from Walmart and the goal of this is to make it look a little cooler than it looks right now. So, I went with the following plan. Cut a board to length. route the edge on the table router, then trim off the edging. Voila, instant molding. (And I thought Handyman magazine had no reason to nominate me to the Woodworkers Hall of Fame…)

I didn't go with anything fancy, just some cove edging. The cove would slim the top of the edge down so that there would be very little mixed wood where the plywood meets the board. I held up a piece just to give the general idea -



I will run it along the edges so that the open space is framed. This will not reduce the open space for the shoes to fit and, once mitered and trimmed, it will give a more appealing look.

Now why am I going through such pains to explain, step by step, a process where I am working with a crappy piece of wood in an effort to make a slightly above mediocre piece?

For one, this simple project covers a multitude of basic woodworking skills. It involves routing, sawing, dadoing, rabbeting, measuring, mitering, building a basic frame (which is the starting point of cabinetry, box building, bookcases, etc.) and most importantly, using your head to think through a problem then using your tools to make that thought a reality. And secondly, show other new people out there that not everyone out here is a lifelong woodworking guru. You all are fantastic people, modest, supportive, and very skilled. But I have to tell you all that, speaking from a newbie perspective, sometimes showing your work to you folks is like playing Mary Had a Little Lamb to Eric Clapton. So if there are other new people out there feeling a little intimidated, it doesn't hurt for them to know that there are others in the same boat who are practicing, experimenting, and starting at the beginning also.

I am happy with the couple hours I got to spend in the shop today. I felt good about working out a solution and putting the plan into motion. It may not be the most original, but it was a good exercise in problem solving and shaping the wood to meet the little vision in my head.

Thank you all for reading, and happy woodworking!

David
Hey David, I just had a similar problem. I made a fly-tying caddy for my grandson out of Birch ply with box joints. The joints looked ok, but the top rim and a little shelf below showed the ply edges like on your shoe rack.

To make it look better, I sawed a thin strip of solid Birch and sanded it to a consistent thickness of about 1/8", ripped it into strips a little more than the thickness of the ply and then glued it onto the edges with miter joints and later planed it to the surface with a block plane on the outside edges and chisel inside.

It really improved the overall look and make it into something much nicer. I think with little touches like that we can get a lot more out of our projects. I see you are doing something similar and it should look nice when finished.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Working on edging

For those that are just tuning in, this was originally a quick project for a friend to just have something to throw her shoes on. Crap wood was used, old plywood, nasty aged paint on some of the pieces and now she decided she wants it in the entryway so I have to try and figure out how to make it look halfway decent…

So now I have the carcass built, still needs some sanding and some repair of the cracked plywood areas. That will be remedied by a think layer of sawdust and glue. This will be painted and most of the flaws hidden. This is not a work of art, this is a practical project to hone and practice skills and practice some problem solving. It is my belief that a good woodworker can take some crappy pine and can make it look better. A poor woodworker can take some beautiful walnut and make it look like crappy pine. So while I have been honing my skills, I have been working with the poor stuff, salvaged and found wood.

So here is the task for today. I had to come up with something to hide the plywood edges.



Not very pretty… Even though painted, the edges will still look like plywood. So this is a good practice session on covering those up. Had I not already fastened the top, I could have built a face frame, which would have covered up most of the edges and just would have left the top edge which could have been covered by edge banding tape or molding. Unfortunately, the top is already fastened so no work with face frames today. I don't really want to do the edge banding, just makes it look like another box from Walmart and the goal of this is to make it look a little cooler than it looks right now. So, I went with the following plan. Cut a board to length. route the edge on the table router, then trim off the edging. Voila, instant molding. (And I thought Handyman magazine had no reason to nominate me to the Woodworkers Hall of Fame…)

I didn't go with anything fancy, just some cove edging. The cove would slim the top of the edge down so that there would be very little mixed wood where the plywood meets the board. I held up a piece just to give the general idea -



I will run it along the edges so that the open space is framed. This will not reduce the open space for the shoes to fit and, once mitered and trimmed, it will give a more appealing look.

Now why am I going through such pains to explain, step by step, a process where I am working with a crappy piece of wood in an effort to make a slightly above mediocre piece?

For one, this simple project covers a multitude of basic woodworking skills. It involves routing, sawing, dadoing, rabbeting, measuring, mitering, building a basic frame (which is the starting point of cabinetry, box building, bookcases, etc.) and most importantly, using your head to think through a problem then using your tools to make that thought a reality. And secondly, show other new people out there that not everyone out here is a lifelong woodworking guru. You all are fantastic people, modest, supportive, and very skilled. But I have to tell you all that, speaking from a newbie perspective, sometimes showing your work to you folks is like playing Mary Had a Little Lamb to Eric Clapton. So if there are other new people out there feeling a little intimidated, it doesn't hurt for them to know that there are others in the same boat who are practicing, experimenting, and starting at the beginning also.

I am happy with the couple hours I got to spend in the shop today. I felt good about working out a solution and putting the plan into motion. It may not be the most original, but it was a good exercise in problem solving and shaping the wood to meet the little vision in my head.

Thank you all for reading, and happy woodworking!

David
Thanks for the comments fellas.

Masrol - Thanks for the encouragement and the comments. The right angle clamps work really well and are quite simple to make. I had a blog on the process here in case you are interested :)

Dennis - Yep, once family and friends find out you are a hall of famer…look out! Thank you for the morning chuckle.

Mike - Once again you highlight what I love so much about this community. You share a tip on how you resolved a similar problem. Kindly giving kudos at the same time you offer your own experiences. Thank you for that.

And just to give everyone a little chuckle…

I was reading the comments via email. In the middle of these was a comment by someone that said "I like the color" I almost spit coffee all over myself. Then I realized it was for a different project :)

Thanks again all for the read and the comments,

David
 

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Working on edging

For those that are just tuning in, this was originally a quick project for a friend to just have something to throw her shoes on. Crap wood was used, old plywood, nasty aged paint on some of the pieces and now she decided she wants it in the entryway so I have to try and figure out how to make it look halfway decent…

So now I have the carcass built, still needs some sanding and some repair of the cracked plywood areas. That will be remedied by a think layer of sawdust and glue. This will be painted and most of the flaws hidden. This is not a work of art, this is a practical project to hone and practice skills and practice some problem solving. It is my belief that a good woodworker can take some crappy pine and can make it look better. A poor woodworker can take some beautiful walnut and make it look like crappy pine. So while I have been honing my skills, I have been working with the poor stuff, salvaged and found wood.

So here is the task for today. I had to come up with something to hide the plywood edges.



Not very pretty… Even though painted, the edges will still look like plywood. So this is a good practice session on covering those up. Had I not already fastened the top, I could have built a face frame, which would have covered up most of the edges and just would have left the top edge which could have been covered by edge banding tape or molding. Unfortunately, the top is already fastened so no work with face frames today. I don't really want to do the edge banding, just makes it look like another box from Walmart and the goal of this is to make it look a little cooler than it looks right now. So, I went with the following plan. Cut a board to length. route the edge on the table router, then trim off the edging. Voila, instant molding. (And I thought Handyman magazine had no reason to nominate me to the Woodworkers Hall of Fame…)

I didn't go with anything fancy, just some cove edging. The cove would slim the top of the edge down so that there would be very little mixed wood where the plywood meets the board. I held up a piece just to give the general idea -



I will run it along the edges so that the open space is framed. This will not reduce the open space for the shoes to fit and, once mitered and trimmed, it will give a more appealing look.

Now why am I going through such pains to explain, step by step, a process where I am working with a crappy piece of wood in an effort to make a slightly above mediocre piece?

For one, this simple project covers a multitude of basic woodworking skills. It involves routing, sawing, dadoing, rabbeting, measuring, mitering, building a basic frame (which is the starting point of cabinetry, box building, bookcases, etc.) and most importantly, using your head to think through a problem then using your tools to make that thought a reality. And secondly, show other new people out there that not everyone out here is a lifelong woodworking guru. You all are fantastic people, modest, supportive, and very skilled. But I have to tell you all that, speaking from a newbie perspective, sometimes showing your work to you folks is like playing Mary Had a Little Lamb to Eric Clapton. So if there are other new people out there feeling a little intimidated, it doesn't hurt for them to know that there are others in the same boat who are practicing, experimenting, and starting at the beginning also.

I am happy with the couple hours I got to spend in the shop today. I felt good about working out a solution and putting the plan into motion. It may not be the most original, but it was a good exercise in problem solving and shaping the wood to meet the little vision in my head.

Thank you all for reading, and happy woodworking!

David
you are welcome
but it seems to me that I was the only one that had read the tag (humor) and take your word
litterly as they were said and I got confused when read the blog later with the others comments
and said to my self did I missed something when I translate it in my head

Dennis
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Working on edging

For those that are just tuning in, this was originally a quick project for a friend to just have something to throw her shoes on. Crap wood was used, old plywood, nasty aged paint on some of the pieces and now she decided she wants it in the entryway so I have to try and figure out how to make it look halfway decent…

So now I have the carcass built, still needs some sanding and some repair of the cracked plywood areas. That will be remedied by a think layer of sawdust and glue. This will be painted and most of the flaws hidden. This is not a work of art, this is a practical project to hone and practice skills and practice some problem solving. It is my belief that a good woodworker can take some crappy pine and can make it look better. A poor woodworker can take some beautiful walnut and make it look like crappy pine. So while I have been honing my skills, I have been working with the poor stuff, salvaged and found wood.

So here is the task for today. I had to come up with something to hide the plywood edges.



Not very pretty… Even though painted, the edges will still look like plywood. So this is a good practice session on covering those up. Had I not already fastened the top, I could have built a face frame, which would have covered up most of the edges and just would have left the top edge which could have been covered by edge banding tape or molding. Unfortunately, the top is already fastened so no work with face frames today. I don't really want to do the edge banding, just makes it look like another box from Walmart and the goal of this is to make it look a little cooler than it looks right now. So, I went with the following plan. Cut a board to length. route the edge on the table router, then trim off the edging. Voila, instant molding. (And I thought Handyman magazine had no reason to nominate me to the Woodworkers Hall of Fame…)

I didn't go with anything fancy, just some cove edging. The cove would slim the top of the edge down so that there would be very little mixed wood where the plywood meets the board. I held up a piece just to give the general idea -



I will run it along the edges so that the open space is framed. This will not reduce the open space for the shoes to fit and, once mitered and trimmed, it will give a more appealing look.

Now why am I going through such pains to explain, step by step, a process where I am working with a crappy piece of wood in an effort to make a slightly above mediocre piece?

For one, this simple project covers a multitude of basic woodworking skills. It involves routing, sawing, dadoing, rabbeting, measuring, mitering, building a basic frame (which is the starting point of cabinetry, box building, bookcases, etc.) and most importantly, using your head to think through a problem then using your tools to make that thought a reality. And secondly, show other new people out there that not everyone out here is a lifelong woodworking guru. You all are fantastic people, modest, supportive, and very skilled. But I have to tell you all that, speaking from a newbie perspective, sometimes showing your work to you folks is like playing Mary Had a Little Lamb to Eric Clapton. So if there are other new people out there feeling a little intimidated, it doesn't hurt for them to know that there are others in the same boat who are practicing, experimenting, and starting at the beginning also.

I am happy with the couple hours I got to spend in the shop today. I felt good about working out a solution and putting the plan into motion. It may not be the most original, but it was a good exercise in problem solving and shaping the wood to meet the little vision in my head.

Thank you all for reading, and happy woodworking!

David
I think you translated it right Dennis. Handyman Magazine has a habit of sending out form letters inviting you to their lifetime membership. The form letter tells you that you got the letter because your work has been "recognized" and that the membership is the equivalent of being in the "woodworking hall of fame." So I wrote out a sarcastic letter of thanks to the lumberjocks here because I found the form letter so hilarious. Obviously my work is not worthy of such a true honor and others were just relaying their own experiences with the company. It is a legitimate organization and their magazine is excellent, but their advertising is so cheesy and full of ego stroking. But I do believe you got the humor of what I was saying and you were on track.
 

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Working on edging

For those that are just tuning in, this was originally a quick project for a friend to just have something to throw her shoes on. Crap wood was used, old plywood, nasty aged paint on some of the pieces and now she decided she wants it in the entryway so I have to try and figure out how to make it look halfway decent…

So now I have the carcass built, still needs some sanding and some repair of the cracked plywood areas. That will be remedied by a think layer of sawdust and glue. This will be painted and most of the flaws hidden. This is not a work of art, this is a practical project to hone and practice skills and practice some problem solving. It is my belief that a good woodworker can take some crappy pine and can make it look better. A poor woodworker can take some beautiful walnut and make it look like crappy pine. So while I have been honing my skills, I have been working with the poor stuff, salvaged and found wood.

So here is the task for today. I had to come up with something to hide the plywood edges.



Not very pretty… Even though painted, the edges will still look like plywood. So this is a good practice session on covering those up. Had I not already fastened the top, I could have built a face frame, which would have covered up most of the edges and just would have left the top edge which could have been covered by edge banding tape or molding. Unfortunately, the top is already fastened so no work with face frames today. I don't really want to do the edge banding, just makes it look like another box from Walmart and the goal of this is to make it look a little cooler than it looks right now. So, I went with the following plan. Cut a board to length. route the edge on the table router, then trim off the edging. Voila, instant molding. (And I thought Handyman magazine had no reason to nominate me to the Woodworkers Hall of Fame…)

I didn't go with anything fancy, just some cove edging. The cove would slim the top of the edge down so that there would be very little mixed wood where the plywood meets the board. I held up a piece just to give the general idea -



I will run it along the edges so that the open space is framed. This will not reduce the open space for the shoes to fit and, once mitered and trimmed, it will give a more appealing look.

Now why am I going through such pains to explain, step by step, a process where I am working with a crappy piece of wood in an effort to make a slightly above mediocre piece?

For one, this simple project covers a multitude of basic woodworking skills. It involves routing, sawing, dadoing, rabbeting, measuring, mitering, building a basic frame (which is the starting point of cabinetry, box building, bookcases, etc.) and most importantly, using your head to think through a problem then using your tools to make that thought a reality. And secondly, show other new people out there that not everyone out here is a lifelong woodworking guru. You all are fantastic people, modest, supportive, and very skilled. But I have to tell you all that, speaking from a newbie perspective, sometimes showing your work to you folks is like playing Mary Had a Little Lamb to Eric Clapton. So if there are other new people out there feeling a little intimidated, it doesn't hurt for them to know that there are others in the same boat who are practicing, experimenting, and starting at the beginning also.

I am happy with the couple hours I got to spend in the shop today. I felt good about working out a solution and putting the plan into motion. It may not be the most original, but it was a good exercise in problem solving and shaping the wood to meet the little vision in my head.

Thank you all for reading, and happy woodworking!

David
but I read it as it was a joke from some L Js becourse off the earlyer post of a shue rack you made
and I wasn´t aware off that lausy way of advertising yes I have seen a lot other similar mails from
queer persons and compani´s like those that selling 15000 plans on ebay and the only thing people get
is crap with broken link´s

but I still think you made a good funny story

Dennis
 

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Working on edging

For those that are just tuning in, this was originally a quick project for a friend to just have something to throw her shoes on. Crap wood was used, old plywood, nasty aged paint on some of the pieces and now she decided she wants it in the entryway so I have to try and figure out how to make it look halfway decent…

So now I have the carcass built, still needs some sanding and some repair of the cracked plywood areas. That will be remedied by a think layer of sawdust and glue. This will be painted and most of the flaws hidden. This is not a work of art, this is a practical project to hone and practice skills and practice some problem solving. It is my belief that a good woodworker can take some crappy pine and can make it look better. A poor woodworker can take some beautiful walnut and make it look like crappy pine. So while I have been honing my skills, I have been working with the poor stuff, salvaged and found wood.

So here is the task for today. I had to come up with something to hide the plywood edges.



Not very pretty… Even though painted, the edges will still look like plywood. So this is a good practice session on covering those up. Had I not already fastened the top, I could have built a face frame, which would have covered up most of the edges and just would have left the top edge which could have been covered by edge banding tape or molding. Unfortunately, the top is already fastened so no work with face frames today. I don't really want to do the edge banding, just makes it look like another box from Walmart and the goal of this is to make it look a little cooler than it looks right now. So, I went with the following plan. Cut a board to length. route the edge on the table router, then trim off the edging. Voila, instant molding. (And I thought Handyman magazine had no reason to nominate me to the Woodworkers Hall of Fame…)

I didn't go with anything fancy, just some cove edging. The cove would slim the top of the edge down so that there would be very little mixed wood where the plywood meets the board. I held up a piece just to give the general idea -



I will run it along the edges so that the open space is framed. This will not reduce the open space for the shoes to fit and, once mitered and trimmed, it will give a more appealing look.

Now why am I going through such pains to explain, step by step, a process where I am working with a crappy piece of wood in an effort to make a slightly above mediocre piece?

For one, this simple project covers a multitude of basic woodworking skills. It involves routing, sawing, dadoing, rabbeting, measuring, mitering, building a basic frame (which is the starting point of cabinetry, box building, bookcases, etc.) and most importantly, using your head to think through a problem then using your tools to make that thought a reality. And secondly, show other new people out there that not everyone out here is a lifelong woodworking guru. You all are fantastic people, modest, supportive, and very skilled. But I have to tell you all that, speaking from a newbie perspective, sometimes showing your work to you folks is like playing Mary Had a Little Lamb to Eric Clapton. So if there are other new people out there feeling a little intimidated, it doesn't hurt for them to know that there are others in the same boat who are practicing, experimenting, and starting at the beginning also.

I am happy with the couple hours I got to spend in the shop today. I felt good about working out a solution and putting the plan into motion. It may not be the most original, but it was a good exercise in problem solving and shaping the wood to meet the little vision in my head.

Thank you all for reading, and happy woodworking!

David
Everyday is a learning experience here : ) Nice project …hope to see the outcome soon !
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Working on edging

For those that are just tuning in, this was originally a quick project for a friend to just have something to throw her shoes on. Crap wood was used, old plywood, nasty aged paint on some of the pieces and now she decided she wants it in the entryway so I have to try and figure out how to make it look halfway decent…

So now I have the carcass built, still needs some sanding and some repair of the cracked plywood areas. That will be remedied by a think layer of sawdust and glue. This will be painted and most of the flaws hidden. This is not a work of art, this is a practical project to hone and practice skills and practice some problem solving. It is my belief that a good woodworker can take some crappy pine and can make it look better. A poor woodworker can take some beautiful walnut and make it look like crappy pine. So while I have been honing my skills, I have been working with the poor stuff, salvaged and found wood.

So here is the task for today. I had to come up with something to hide the plywood edges.



Not very pretty… Even though painted, the edges will still look like plywood. So this is a good practice session on covering those up. Had I not already fastened the top, I could have built a face frame, which would have covered up most of the edges and just would have left the top edge which could have been covered by edge banding tape or molding. Unfortunately, the top is already fastened so no work with face frames today. I don't really want to do the edge banding, just makes it look like another box from Walmart and the goal of this is to make it look a little cooler than it looks right now. So, I went with the following plan. Cut a board to length. route the edge on the table router, then trim off the edging. Voila, instant molding. (And I thought Handyman magazine had no reason to nominate me to the Woodworkers Hall of Fame…)

I didn't go with anything fancy, just some cove edging. The cove would slim the top of the edge down so that there would be very little mixed wood where the plywood meets the board. I held up a piece just to give the general idea -



I will run it along the edges so that the open space is framed. This will not reduce the open space for the shoes to fit and, once mitered and trimmed, it will give a more appealing look.

Now why am I going through such pains to explain, step by step, a process where I am working with a crappy piece of wood in an effort to make a slightly above mediocre piece?

For one, this simple project covers a multitude of basic woodworking skills. It involves routing, sawing, dadoing, rabbeting, measuring, mitering, building a basic frame (which is the starting point of cabinetry, box building, bookcases, etc.) and most importantly, using your head to think through a problem then using your tools to make that thought a reality. And secondly, show other new people out there that not everyone out here is a lifelong woodworking guru. You all are fantastic people, modest, supportive, and very skilled. But I have to tell you all that, speaking from a newbie perspective, sometimes showing your work to you folks is like playing Mary Had a Little Lamb to Eric Clapton. So if there are other new people out there feeling a little intimidated, it doesn't hurt for them to know that there are others in the same boat who are practicing, experimenting, and starting at the beginning also.

I am happy with the couple hours I got to spend in the shop today. I felt good about working out a solution and putting the plan into motion. It may not be the most original, but it was a good exercise in problem solving and shaping the wood to meet the little vision in my head.

Thank you all for reading, and happy woodworking!

David
Thanks for the kind words Dusty. Yes, there is a wealth of knowledge here and I love sucking it all in :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Time's Up

Well, I got to spend a couple more hours on the shoe rack, but that is all the time allotted to me. It is gone and I can't do any more work on it. My friend was in closet cleaning mode again and she needed it now :)

Ok, so I was not able to paint it, I am hoping she will get around to it at a later date. So I will just give you the highlights of what I was able to do.

Last update I gave, the carcass looked like this…



Today, i was able to finish cutting the cove molding, size it, miter it on the bandsaw, and sand it level to the edges, and when she picked it up, it looked like this…



So, aside from the ugly blue top, the lamination didn't come out too bad. Kind of picture framish, but at least I was able to demonstrate to myself that I could do a lamination over plywood and make it look a little better. I worked out a pretty efficient (and safe) molding process. I had a 1×6 board and I ran the edge on the router table. Then I would go over to the table saw and cut off the edge. Back to the router table and repeat. This allowed me to do fairly thin decorative trim without the dangers of trying to cut thin pieces on the router table. I liked the cove shape because it would give a little interest around the top and the shelf, but taper to a thinner piece around the edges. On the legs, up to the shelf, I just trimmed off thin pieces of pine at the same thickness as the thinnest part of the cove molding.

But man, I really would have loved to have just a couple more hours :)

Thanks for your attention to the blog. It was a fun confidence builder. After all, I stacked the odds majorly against me. And my rule of thumb is that if a project comes out less than I hoped, but better than I feared, then I am doing ok.

Happy Woodworking all,

David
 

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Time's Up

Well, I got to spend a couple more hours on the shoe rack, but that is all the time allotted to me. It is gone and I can't do any more work on it. My friend was in closet cleaning mode again and she needed it now :)

Ok, so I was not able to paint it, I am hoping she will get around to it at a later date. So I will just give you the highlights of what I was able to do.

Last update I gave, the carcass looked like this…



Today, i was able to finish cutting the cove molding, size it, miter it on the bandsaw, and sand it level to the edges, and when she picked it up, it looked like this…



So, aside from the ugly blue top, the lamination didn't come out too bad. Kind of picture framish, but at least I was able to demonstrate to myself that I could do a lamination over plywood and make it look a little better. I worked out a pretty efficient (and safe) molding process. I had a 1×6 board and I ran the edge on the router table. Then I would go over to the table saw and cut off the edge. Back to the router table and repeat. This allowed me to do fairly thin decorative trim without the dangers of trying to cut thin pieces on the router table. I liked the cove shape because it would give a little interest around the top and the shelf, but taper to a thinner piece around the edges. On the legs, up to the shelf, I just trimmed off thin pieces of pine at the same thickness as the thinnest part of the cove molding.

But man, I really would have loved to have just a couple more hours :)

Thanks for your attention to the blog. It was a fun confidence builder. After all, I stacked the odds majorly against me. And my rule of thumb is that if a project comes out less than I hoped, but better than I feared, then I am doing ok.

Happy Woodworking all,

David
That's a pretty fancy shoe rack! Me, I would've just pounded them all together and hoped for the best! That should last forever but I guess with boots and shoes from two growing boys, it'll take a lickin!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Time's Up

Well, I got to spend a couple more hours on the shoe rack, but that is all the time allotted to me. It is gone and I can't do any more work on it. My friend was in closet cleaning mode again and she needed it now :)

Ok, so I was not able to paint it, I am hoping she will get around to it at a later date. So I will just give you the highlights of what I was able to do.

Last update I gave, the carcass looked like this…



Today, i was able to finish cutting the cove molding, size it, miter it on the bandsaw, and sand it level to the edges, and when she picked it up, it looked like this…



So, aside from the ugly blue top, the lamination didn't come out too bad. Kind of picture framish, but at least I was able to demonstrate to myself that I could do a lamination over plywood and make it look a little better. I worked out a pretty efficient (and safe) molding process. I had a 1×6 board and I ran the edge on the router table. Then I would go over to the table saw and cut off the edge. Back to the router table and repeat. This allowed me to do fairly thin decorative trim without the dangers of trying to cut thin pieces on the router table. I liked the cove shape because it would give a little interest around the top and the shelf, but taper to a thinner piece around the edges. On the legs, up to the shelf, I just trimmed off thin pieces of pine at the same thickness as the thinnest part of the cove molding.

But man, I really would have loved to have just a couple more hours :)

Thanks for your attention to the blog. It was a fun confidence builder. After all, I stacked the odds majorly against me. And my rule of thumb is that if a project comes out less than I hoped, but better than I feared, then I am doing ok.

Happy Woodworking all,

David
You are too modest on your carpentry skills Jordan, but even if that were true, you would then carve a couple pairs of shoes to set on them that would look more real than the real shoes. Probably would be fun to carve some replicas of the boys' shoes then sit back and watch them try to put them on :)

Thanks for reading and know that your family is in my heart and mind,

David
 

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Time's Up

Well, I got to spend a couple more hours on the shoe rack, but that is all the time allotted to me. It is gone and I can't do any more work on it. My friend was in closet cleaning mode again and she needed it now :)

Ok, so I was not able to paint it, I am hoping she will get around to it at a later date. So I will just give you the highlights of what I was able to do.

Last update I gave, the carcass looked like this…



Today, i was able to finish cutting the cove molding, size it, miter it on the bandsaw, and sand it level to the edges, and when she picked it up, it looked like this…



So, aside from the ugly blue top, the lamination didn't come out too bad. Kind of picture framish, but at least I was able to demonstrate to myself that I could do a lamination over plywood and make it look a little better. I worked out a pretty efficient (and safe) molding process. I had a 1×6 board and I ran the edge on the router table. Then I would go over to the table saw and cut off the edge. Back to the router table and repeat. This allowed me to do fairly thin decorative trim without the dangers of trying to cut thin pieces on the router table. I liked the cove shape because it would give a little interest around the top and the shelf, but taper to a thinner piece around the edges. On the legs, up to the shelf, I just trimmed off thin pieces of pine at the same thickness as the thinnest part of the cove molding.

But man, I really would have loved to have just a couple more hours :)

Thanks for your attention to the blog. It was a fun confidence builder. After all, I stacked the odds majorly against me. And my rule of thumb is that if a project comes out less than I hoped, but better than I feared, then I am doing ok.

Happy Woodworking all,

David
I like your shoe rack. I think you are doing a wonderful job.
 
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