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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Going Green

This is a project that has been on my mind for several years. I enjoy hand tool woodworking and I like to try my hand at many different types of woodworking projects. For the most part, I tend to avoid green woodworking. Usually I don't have green wood available and I don't seek it out. At 56 years old, I tend to protect my body from the kind of heavy work required to split out sections of wood from a log. Also, I lack the proper equipment and tools to do it efficiently. Some of that changed recently when one of my oak trees at my home needed to be removed. I asked the contractor to save a couple 8 foot lengths so that my friend could cut it into slabs with his Alaskan chain saw mill. For me, chain saws are like boats. It's good to know someone that has one!

Plant Sky Tree Wood Land lot


This was right before the pandemic hit, so the logs proceeded to sit for several months and get bug infested. But finally, we decided to mill the logs before the bugs and rot took over. We milled the largest log into two 2" slabs and a 5" slab. Fortunately, the worms had not got into the heart of the log yet.

Wood Grass Natural material Lumber Groundcover


The 5" slab will be set aside to be used as a mantel over a fire place at my home after it dries for a few years at least. I couldn't resist starting a project with one of those 2" slabs, so I decided it was finally time to make the shaving horse.

If you search the internet, there is a huge variety in designs for a shaving horse. It seems that no two are alike and they are all customized to the user or to the work. Often they are very ruggedly constructed using simple tools like the axe, framing chisel and auger. There is a bodger style of shaving horse that uses a frame to hold the work. I think this style is preferred for chair making with shorter workpieces, but can be used for most anything. The style that I am partial to is the dumbhead version called a schnitzelbank. The reason I like this version is that the work can be clamped from the side of the dumbhead. So if the workpiece is long, you don't have to feed it into a frame. But either one is fine really.

Roy Underhill has made both versions on his show. My favorite is from season 1 of the Woodwright's shop where he makes the dumbhead version from a single log. Even if you don't make a shaving horse this way, it is fun to watch Roy make this thing. It seems like a miracle to me that he doesn't cut off his hand with the hatchet. In season 17, Roy makes a version from construction lumber which has a couple of helpful techniques. In season 24, Roy makes the bodger style with the frame style clamp, again from a log. You can purchase the episodes for lifetime streaming here:

https://videos.popularwoodworking.com

Here is a sketch of the dumbhead version that I will make from Roy Underhill's book, The Woodwright's Guide page 23.

Furniture Table Rectangle Parallel Drawing


Roy provides rough dimensions, but I will adapt it to my available wood slabs. I will try to stay in the spirit of this kind of rugged woodworking and use a minimal tool kit including a hatchet, framing chisel, T-auger, handsaw and jack plane. I will minimally use a couple power tools to facilitate the process including a circular saw and a powered lathe.

I will share a couple future posts on the green woodworking fun. Stay tuned… :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The Stock and the Base

You need a fair amount of wood to build a shaving horse. It doesn't matter too much how you get there, but I think you should target an 8 foot board that is at least 2" thick and about 9" wide. This will be enough for the bench and ramp sections. You can buy a plank from the lumber yard, a mill or split it from a log. It can be green, seasoned or dried wood. I am using green oak for my shaving horse, but you can probably use most any type of wood. If it doesn't split, you will need to do more sawing.

I will use one of my 2" thick slabs for the bench and the ramp. I will use one of the pieces from the outside cut from the log for the clamp (dumbhead), legs and foot platform. I trim down the 2 inch slab with a circular saw and I get a nice 9" wide plank that is at least 2 inches thick. The chain saw mill really did a good job and kept an even thickness over the full length. It's a nice board with only a couple knots.

Saw Wood Chainsaw Flooring Floor


Wood Road surface Asphalt Floor Flooring


I cut off a 30 inch long section for the ramp and that leaves about a 5 foot long section for the bench. Now that I have my bench plank which is the base of the shaving horse, I can lay out for the leg mortises. For a sturdy bench, I suggest that the mortises should be at least 1" diameter. 1-1/2" would be better. I have a 1-1/4" T-auger that I purchased several years ago (for no apparent reason!), so I will use that. The legs need to be splayed out to the sides and to the back and front. I was not sure about the angles, so I guessed. I laid out site lines at 45 degrees from the sides and set a bevel gauge to about 20 degrees. This worked out "ok", but it should have been more splayed out, so I suggest you try 30-40 degrees. Or you can do like Roy and eyeball it.

Wood Road surface Asphalt Font Gas


The outside cut from the log has a thicker end where the trunk flared out for the base of the tree. I will cut out my clamp head and arm from this section about 33" long. The rest of that outside plank gets cut to 20" long sections to split out billets for the legs.

Wood Outdoor bench Road surface Plant Flooring


Wood Branch Trunk Road surface Plant


Wood Composite material Soil Event Hardwood


You can rough out the legs with an axe or you can use a drawknife in a vise to shape the legs about 2" in diameter. But I decided to turn them rough on the lathe, leaving flats and imperfections in keeping with the spirit of a rugged device. This allowed me to turn a fairly precise tenon to fit to the base. Sorry no pictures on the lathe, but it was not too exciting. I kept a snug fit with the green wood. I will wedge them later after the green wood decides what to do after drying.

Furniture Outdoor bench Road surface Asphalt Wood


Next I will prepare the ramp and riser. and shape the clamp.

Also, it is great to work outside this time of year in NJ. We also have pretty sunsets after a hard day of woodworking. :)

Sky Cloud Atmosphere Ecoregion Natural landscape
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Fitting the Ramp

This kind of shaving horse is really not too fussy about precise construction. Installing the ramp is a fairly easy process, however, I did fuss with it quite a bit. Since this wood is totally green and is bound to shrink and move, I think it was not really productive to spend as much time as I spent setting up the ramp. But I am not too used this kind of woodworking, so I just did my best.

In the version that I am making, the ramp needs to be beveled on the underside where it mates up with the base. I set the ramp in place with a temporary riser piece and roughly marked out for the bevel on the underside. I then removed some of the waste with a half hatchet (that's all I have right now) and then worked it with a heavy set jack plane. I expect you could do all the bevel with a hewing hatchet if you have one. That should be precise enough.

Wood Floor Flooring Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Tool Wood stain Flooring Floor


Then I set it up again with the temporary riser and found the angle for the slot for the riser. This slot helps to keep the riser from sliding out of place during use and provides a more stable base for the clamp. Then I laid out for the slot and cut it out with the saw and chisel.

Wood Rectangle Plank Wood stain Flooring


Outdoor bench Wood Outdoor furniture Rectangle Wood stain


Outdoor bench Wood Picnic table Outdoor furniture Rectangle


Tool Wood Hardwood Wood stain Office ruler


Wood Rectangle Flooring Outdoor furniture Wood stain


Wood Wood stain Natural material Hardwood Plank


I roughly prepared a 6" high riser from an offcut and worked it with the jack plane to fit the slot and square it up to the base. It's not fancy, but it was fit up well enough.

The riser is held in place by dowels into the base. I marked out the location of the riser on the base and set a couple nails where I want the dowels. Then I clipped off the nails and tapped the riser down to mark the locations. Then I just removed the nails and bored 1/2" holes for the dowels in the base and riser. I elongated one of the holes to allow for wood movement.

Musical instrument Wood Tool Office supplies Electric blue


Rectangle Wood Flooring Grey Floor


Table Wood Wood stain Bumper Hardwood


Wood Road surface Asphalt Floor Wood stain


Outdoor bench Table Wood Rectangle Wood stain


It looks pretty good up to this point, but I was not comfortable with the height of the riser. I really wanted it lower to be more inline with my elbows. So I spent some time reworking the riser height and adjusting the bevel accordingly. Eventually, I got to a point where the height seemed right for me and things were fitting up OK. I used a different method to adjust the bevel by sawing stop cuts and chiseling out the waste. I saw this in one of Roy's videos and it worked well. I finished by leveling it with the jack plane. I also worked the slot and riser to get an even fit since it will be taking some pressure in use.

Wood Wood stain Flooring Hardwood Plank


Table Wood Outdoor furniture Flooring Floor


Wood Table Hardwood Flooring Rectangle


Wood Floor Road surface Flooring Rectangle


The last picture above is a later one in the process, but it shows a pretty good fit for the riser and ramp bevel. I''m not sure if it is worth putting this much effort into green woodworking considering the wood is going to be shrinking a lot and moving. Time will tell. for now it looks pretty good.

Next steps are forming and fitting the clamp.

Thanks for reading…. :)
 

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Fitting the Ramp

This kind of shaving horse is really not too fussy about precise construction. Installing the ramp is a fairly easy process, however, I did fuss with it quite a bit. Since this wood is totally green and is bound to shrink and move, I think it was not really productive to spend as much time as I spent setting up the ramp. But I am not too used this kind of woodworking, so I just did my best.

In the version that I am making, the ramp needs to be beveled on the underside where it mates up with the base. I set the ramp in place with a temporary riser piece and roughly marked out for the bevel on the underside. I then removed some of the waste with a half hatchet (that's all I have right now) and then worked it with a heavy set jack plane. I expect you could do all the bevel with a hewing hatchet if you have one. That should be precise enough.

Wood Floor Flooring Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Tool Wood stain Flooring Floor


Then I set it up again with the temporary riser and found the angle for the slot for the riser. This slot helps to keep the riser from sliding out of place during use and provides a more stable base for the clamp. Then I laid out for the slot and cut it out with the saw and chisel.

Wood Rectangle Plank Wood stain Flooring


Outdoor bench Wood Outdoor furniture Rectangle Wood stain


Outdoor bench Wood Picnic table Outdoor furniture Rectangle


Tool Wood Hardwood Wood stain Office ruler


Wood Rectangle Flooring Outdoor furniture Wood stain


Wood Wood stain Natural material Hardwood Plank


I roughly prepared a 6" high riser from an offcut and worked it with the jack plane to fit the slot and square it up to the base. It's not fancy, but it was fit up well enough.

The riser is held in place by dowels into the base. I marked out the location of the riser on the base and set a couple nails where I want the dowels. Then I clipped off the nails and tapped the riser down to mark the locations. Then I just removed the nails and bored 1/2" holes for the dowels in the base and riser. I elongated one of the holes to allow for wood movement.

Musical instrument Wood Tool Office supplies Electric blue


Rectangle Wood Flooring Grey Floor


Table Wood Wood stain Bumper Hardwood


Wood Road surface Asphalt Floor Wood stain


Outdoor bench Table Wood Rectangle Wood stain


It looks pretty good up to this point, but I was not comfortable with the height of the riser. I really wanted it lower to be more inline with my elbows. So I spent some time reworking the riser height and adjusting the bevel accordingly. Eventually, I got to a point where the height seemed right for me and things were fitting up OK. I used a different method to adjust the bevel by sawing stop cuts and chiseling out the waste. I saw this in one of Roy's videos and it worked well. I finished by leveling it with the jack plane. I also worked the slot and riser to get an even fit since it will be taking some pressure in use.

Wood Wood stain Flooring Hardwood Plank


Table Wood Outdoor furniture Flooring Floor


Wood Table Hardwood Flooring Rectangle


Wood Floor Road surface Flooring Rectangle


The last picture above is a later one in the process, but it shows a pretty good fit for the riser and ramp bevel. I''m not sure if it is worth putting this much effort into green woodworking considering the wood is going to be shrinking a lot and moving. Time will tell. for now it looks pretty good.

Next steps are forming and fitting the clamp.

Thanks for reading…. :)
Glad you're doing this. I'm about to follow suit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Forming the Clamp

The next item is to form the clamp or dumbhead. You don't have to do it this way, especially if you are not making it from a log. You need a pretty good size chunk of wood for the clamp and arm. The overall length is about 31" from top of the head to the bottom of the arm. Another option is to make a frame clamp like a bodgers shaving horse or fit a clamp head on the arm as shown in this print from the internet:

Font Rectangle Parallel Engineering Drawing


So you have other options if you don't have a log. I am using the outside cut from the log milling and taking advantage of the root flare at the bottom of the trunk. I laid out the overall shape on the flat side of the plank and snapped a chalk line down the center as a reference. The clamp arm is 2" wide and I will allow 6" by 6" for the clamp head. I start off by establishing the cuts with a circular saw. This does not cut all the way through but is a good start and guide the rest of the operation. Then I use a hand saw to square up the cut at the base of the clamp head. Then I flipped the piece and split out the sections along the sides of the arm.

Wood Outdoor bench Road surface Plant Flooring


Table Wood Saw Flooring Road surface


Wood Yellow Road surface Composite material Snapshot


Wood Road surface Asphalt Gas Automotive wheel system


Then I split off the waste from the sides of the clamp head and worked the arm to 2" thick. Establishing the cuts with the circular saw really helped to have a reference face for cleaning up the arm.

Wood Road surface Grass Plant Composite material


Wood Building Hardwood Lumber Trunk


Wood Natural material Wood stain Hardwood Plank


Wood Wheel Tire Automotive tire Hardwood


Next I leveled off the top of the clamp head with a circular saw cut and finished it with a hand saw (sorry, no pics). Then I shaped the back of the clamp head, mostly with a jack plane and a framing chisel.

Plant Wood Wheel Tire Gas


Table Wood Tire Wood stain Hardwood


Next I beveled off the face of the clamp head with a chisel and mallet. You can also do this with the hatchet. For me, it was easier (and safer) to work it down with the chisel. It seems like a lot, but it goes quick in the green wood, maybe 5-10 minutes. Take it down in strips that are manageable. I followed that with a bit of rounding over the sharp corners with the jack plane.

Wood Flooring Natural material Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Floor Flooring Chair Gas


Wood Flooring Plant Gas Door


The last bit is to trim the arm to size which is 3". Be careful that you trim the correct side of the arm so that the clamp is under the face side of the head. Oddly, it can be confusing. I ripped it with a hand saw, but you need to wedge open the kerf as you go because the green wood wants to bind up the saw.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Lumber


Wheel Tire Bicycle Bicycle wheel Bicycle tire


Table Wood Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


Now I just need to cut the slots in the ramp and base to mount the clamp. Getting close now… :)
 

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Forming the Clamp

The next item is to form the clamp or dumbhead. You don't have to do it this way, especially if you are not making it from a log. You need a pretty good size chunk of wood for the clamp and arm. The overall length is about 31" from top of the head to the bottom of the arm. Another option is to make a frame clamp like a bodgers shaving horse or fit a clamp head on the arm as shown in this print from the internet:

Font Rectangle Parallel Engineering Drawing


So you have other options if you don't have a log. I am using the outside cut from the log milling and taking advantage of the root flare at the bottom of the trunk. I laid out the overall shape on the flat side of the plank and snapped a chalk line down the center as a reference. The clamp arm is 2" wide and I will allow 6" by 6" for the clamp head. I start off by establishing the cuts with a circular saw. This does not cut all the way through but is a good start and guide the rest of the operation. Then I use a hand saw to square up the cut at the base of the clamp head. Then I flipped the piece and split out the sections along the sides of the arm.

Wood Outdoor bench Road surface Plant Flooring


Table Wood Saw Flooring Road surface


Wood Yellow Road surface Composite material Snapshot


Wood Road surface Asphalt Gas Automotive wheel system


Then I split off the waste from the sides of the clamp head and worked the arm to 2" thick. Establishing the cuts with the circular saw really helped to have a reference face for cleaning up the arm.

Wood Road surface Grass Plant Composite material


Wood Building Hardwood Lumber Trunk


Wood Natural material Wood stain Hardwood Plank


Wood Wheel Tire Automotive tire Hardwood


Next I leveled off the top of the clamp head with a circular saw cut and finished it with a hand saw (sorry, no pics). Then I shaped the back of the clamp head, mostly with a jack plane and a framing chisel.

Plant Wood Wheel Tire Gas


Table Wood Tire Wood stain Hardwood


Next I beveled off the face of the clamp head with a chisel and mallet. You can also do this with the hatchet. For me, it was easier (and safer) to work it down with the chisel. It seems like a lot, but it goes quick in the green wood, maybe 5-10 minutes. Take it down in strips that are manageable. I followed that with a bit of rounding over the sharp corners with the jack plane.

Wood Flooring Natural material Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Floor Flooring Chair Gas


Wood Flooring Plant Gas Door


The last bit is to trim the arm to size which is 3". Be careful that you trim the correct side of the arm so that the clamp is under the face side of the head. Oddly, it can be confusing. I ripped it with a hand saw, but you need to wedge open the kerf as you go because the green wood wants to bind up the saw.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Lumber


Wheel Tire Bicycle Bicycle wheel Bicycle tire


Table Wood Rectangle Hardwood Flooring


Now I just need to cut the slots in the ramp and base to mount the clamp. Getting close now… :)
Lovely head for that horse.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Installing the Clamp and Conclusion

Time to wrap up this build. The last bit is to install the clamp. This is tricky and you have options. You can decide how close you want to clamp to the end of the ramp. You can also decide the opening height of the clamp which determines the size of the workpiece it can hold. To some extent, the height can be adjusted by boring another hole in the arm, but the slots may need to be extended.

The ramp should be firmly in place for this operation, but not pegged yet. You will want to remove the ramp to cut the slots for the clamp arm. Eventually, the ramp gets pegged to the base with two wooden pegs at opposing angles. For this part of the operation, I temporarily nailed the ramp in place. I laid the base on its side and positioned the clamp in my desired position and marked the extremes for the slots in the ramp and base.

Road surface Wood Asphalt Automotive tire Composite material


Shoe Wood Boats and boating--Equipment and supplies Road surface Grass


I bring the lines for the extremes of the arm travel across the tops of the ramp and base. Then I laid out the 2" wide slots for the arm in each piece. I used the 2" leg of the square to mark it out. For the base, I bored out the ends with the auger and chiseled out the middle. I clamped a batten on the bottom to avoid too much blowout. It was difficult to bore the 1" holes in the green wood because the hole closes up on the auger and creates a lot of friction. I also angled the ends to match the arm position for the extremes. Luckily, I encountered a knot that made it even more fun to auger and chisel, but it came out OK in the end.

Outerwear Wood Sleeve Textile Dress


Wood Road surface Asphalt Bicycle tire Grass


Wood Chair Hardwood Natural material Electric blue


Wood Automotive tire Wood stain Hardwood Road surface


Wood Artifact Art Electric blue Font


For the ramp, I cut the slot on the workbench with the chisel as if it were a mortise. It worked fine and it was pretty quick and efficient. Again, I angled the ends to match the arm positions. I did it all from one side with a scrap underneath to protect the bench. It made a fairly crisp clean slot in the green wood.

Table Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Plank


Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


Table Wood Wood stain Natural material Hardwood


Tableware Wood Rectangle Table Wood stain


Finally, I pegged the ramp in place (just one peg for now), positioned the clamp arm in place with the base on its side, shimmed everything in position and bored a 1/2 inch hole for the pivot rod.

Plant Road surface Wood Asphalt Outdoor bench


Table Wood Wood stain Plank Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture Flooring Hardwood


Wood Tradesman Road surface Asphalt Outdoor bench


With the clamp arm installed on the pivot rod, I marked off the final length and trimmed the end for clearance above the ground. Then I used an off cut from the log to fashion a foot platform and cut a slot in similar fashion to the ramp slot. I also beveled the end for extra clearance above the ground. I added a dowel rod to the clamp arm to keep the platform in place.

Wood Natural material Creative arts Hardwood Lumber


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table Pattern


Table Wood Tool Drilling Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Waste container Table Wood Waste containment Hardwood


Outdoor bench Wood Road surface Asphalt Outdoor furniture


I took if for a test drive and darned if it didn't work great. I am pleased with the result. It was hard work to make this device and a new experience for me. I think it will be useful for my future projects. I coated it with BLO (AKA Danish oil) to help moderate the drying process.

Jeans Furniture Outdoor bench Table Wood


Outdoor bench Furniture Wood Outdoor furniture Plant


I hope you enjoyed and give it a try if the opportunity presents itself.

Happy Thanksgiving! :)
 

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Installing the Clamp and Conclusion

Time to wrap up this build. The last bit is to install the clamp. This is tricky and you have options. You can decide how close you want to clamp to the end of the ramp. You can also decide the opening height of the clamp which determines the size of the workpiece it can hold. To some extent, the height can be adjusted by boring another hole in the arm, but the slots may need to be extended.

The ramp should be firmly in place for this operation, but not pegged yet. You will want to remove the ramp to cut the slots for the clamp arm. Eventually, the ramp gets pegged to the base with two wooden pegs at opposing angles. For this part of the operation, I temporarily nailed the ramp in place. I laid the base on its side and positioned the clamp in my desired position and marked the extremes for the slots in the ramp and base.

Road surface Wood Asphalt Automotive tire Composite material


Shoe Wood Boats and boating--Equipment and supplies Road surface Grass


I bring the lines for the extremes of the arm travel across the tops of the ramp and base. Then I laid out the 2" wide slots for the arm in each piece. I used the 2" leg of the square to mark it out. For the base, I bored out the ends with the auger and chiseled out the middle. I clamped a batten on the bottom to avoid too much blowout. It was difficult to bore the 1" holes in the green wood because the hole closes up on the auger and creates a lot of friction. I also angled the ends to match the arm position for the extremes. Luckily, I encountered a knot that made it even more fun to auger and chisel, but it came out OK in the end.

Outerwear Wood Sleeve Textile Dress


Wood Road surface Asphalt Bicycle tire Grass


Wood Chair Hardwood Natural material Electric blue


Wood Automotive tire Wood stain Hardwood Road surface


Wood Artifact Art Electric blue Font


For the ramp, I cut the slot on the workbench with the chisel as if it were a mortise. It worked fine and it was pretty quick and efficient. Again, I angled the ends to match the arm positions. I did it all from one side with a scrap underneath to protect the bench. It made a fairly crisp clean slot in the green wood.

Table Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Plank


Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


Table Wood Wood stain Natural material Hardwood


Tableware Wood Rectangle Table Wood stain


Finally, I pegged the ramp in place (just one peg for now), positioned the clamp arm in place with the base on its side, shimmed everything in position and bored a 1/2 inch hole for the pivot rod.

Plant Road surface Wood Asphalt Outdoor bench


Table Wood Wood stain Plank Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture Flooring Hardwood


Wood Tradesman Road surface Asphalt Outdoor bench


With the clamp arm installed on the pivot rod, I marked off the final length and trimmed the end for clearance above the ground. Then I used an off cut from the log to fashion a foot platform and cut a slot in similar fashion to the ramp slot. I also beveled the end for extra clearance above the ground. I added a dowel rod to the clamp arm to keep the platform in place.

Wood Natural material Creative arts Hardwood Lumber


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table Pattern


Table Wood Tool Drilling Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Waste container Table Wood Waste containment Hardwood


Outdoor bench Wood Road surface Asphalt Outdoor furniture


I took if for a test drive and darned if it didn't work great. I am pleased with the result. It was hard work to make this device and a new experience for me. I think it will be useful for my future projects. I coated it with BLO (AKA Danish oil) to help moderate the drying process.

Jeans Furniture Outdoor bench Table Wood


Outdoor bench Furniture Wood Outdoor furniture Plant


I hope you enjoyed and give it a try if the opportunity presents itself.

Happy Thanksgiving! :)
Great project! Thanks for sharing.
 

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Installing the Clamp and Conclusion

Time to wrap up this build. The last bit is to install the clamp. This is tricky and you have options. You can decide how close you want to clamp to the end of the ramp. You can also decide the opening height of the clamp which determines the size of the workpiece it can hold. To some extent, the height can be adjusted by boring another hole in the arm, but the slots may need to be extended.

The ramp should be firmly in place for this operation, but not pegged yet. You will want to remove the ramp to cut the slots for the clamp arm. Eventually, the ramp gets pegged to the base with two wooden pegs at opposing angles. For this part of the operation, I temporarily nailed the ramp in place. I laid the base on its side and positioned the clamp in my desired position and marked the extremes for the slots in the ramp and base.





I bring the lines for the extremes of the arm travel across the tops of the ramp and base. Then I laid out the 2" wide slots for the arm in each piece. I used the 2" leg of the square to mark it out. For the base, I bored out the ends with the auger and chiseled out the middle. I clamped a batten on the bottom to avoid too much blowout. It was difficult to bore the 1" holes in the green wood because the hole closes up on the auger and creates a lot of friction. I also angled the ends to match the arm position for the extremes. Luckily, I encountered a knot that made it even more fun to auger and chisel, but it came out OK in the end.











For the ramp, I cut the slot on the workbench with the chisel as if it were a mortise. It worked fine and it was pretty quick and efficient. Again, I angled the ends to match the arm positions. I did it all from one side with a scrap underneath to protect the bench. It made a fairly crisp clean slot in the green wood.











Finally, I pegged the ramp in place (just one peg for now), positioned the clamp arm in place with the base on its side, shimmed everything in position and bored a 1/2 inch hole for the pivot rod.









With the clamp arm installed on the pivot rod, I marked off the final length and trimmed the end for clearance above the ground. Then I used an off cut from the log to fashion a foot platform and cut a slot in similar fashion to the ramp slot. I also beveled the end for extra clearance above the ground. I added a dowel rod to the clamp arm to keep the platform in place.













I took if for a test drive and darned if it didn't work great. I am pleased with the result. It was hard work to make this device and a new experience for me. I think it will be useful for my future projects. I coated it with BLO (AKA Danish oil) to help moderate the drying process.





I hope you enjoyed and give it a try if the opportunity presents itself.

Happy Thanksgiving! :)
nice shaving horse.

I have seen another method for wide mortises which would work with current chisel width:
It is in a Nordic language but the pictures are self explanatory
see second and third picture.
https://hyvelbenk.wordpress.com/2014/03/16/hovelbenken-i-mariestad-er-pa-fotene/
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Installing the Clamp and Conclusion

Time to wrap up this build. The last bit is to install the clamp. This is tricky and you have options. You can decide how close you want to clamp to the end of the ramp. You can also decide the opening height of the clamp which determines the size of the workpiece it can hold. To some extent, the height can be adjusted by boring another hole in the arm, but the slots may need to be extended.

The ramp should be firmly in place for this operation, but not pegged yet. You will want to remove the ramp to cut the slots for the clamp arm. Eventually, the ramp gets pegged to the base with two wooden pegs at opposing angles. For this part of the operation, I temporarily nailed the ramp in place. I laid the base on its side and positioned the clamp in my desired position and marked the extremes for the slots in the ramp and base.

Road surface Wood Asphalt Automotive tire Composite material


Shoe Wood Boats and boating--Equipment and supplies Road surface Grass


I bring the lines for the extremes of the arm travel across the tops of the ramp and base. Then I laid out the 2" wide slots for the arm in each piece. I used the 2" leg of the square to mark it out. For the base, I bored out the ends with the auger and chiseled out the middle. I clamped a batten on the bottom to avoid too much blowout. It was difficult to bore the 1" holes in the green wood because the hole closes up on the auger and creates a lot of friction. I also angled the ends to match the arm position for the extremes. Luckily, I encountered a knot that made it even more fun to auger and chisel, but it came out OK in the end.

Outerwear Wood Sleeve Textile Dress


Wood Road surface Asphalt Bicycle tire Grass


Wood Chair Hardwood Natural material Electric blue


Wood Automotive tire Wood stain Hardwood Road surface


Wood Artifact Art Electric blue Font


For the ramp, I cut the slot on the workbench with the chisel as if it were a mortise. It worked fine and it was pretty quick and efficient. Again, I angled the ends to match the arm positions. I did it all from one side with a scrap underneath to protect the bench. It made a fairly crisp clean slot in the green wood.

Table Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Plank


Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


Table Wood Wood stain Natural material Hardwood


Tableware Wood Rectangle Table Wood stain


Finally, I pegged the ramp in place (just one peg for now), positioned the clamp arm in place with the base on its side, shimmed everything in position and bored a 1/2 inch hole for the pivot rod.

Plant Road surface Wood Asphalt Outdoor bench


Table Wood Wood stain Plank Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture Flooring Hardwood


Wood Tradesman Road surface Asphalt Outdoor bench


With the clamp arm installed on the pivot rod, I marked off the final length and trimmed the end for clearance above the ground. Then I used an off cut from the log to fashion a foot platform and cut a slot in similar fashion to the ramp slot. I also beveled the end for extra clearance above the ground. I added a dowel rod to the clamp arm to keep the platform in place.

Wood Natural material Creative arts Hardwood Lumber


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table Pattern


Table Wood Tool Drilling Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Waste container Table Wood Waste containment Hardwood


Outdoor bench Wood Road surface Asphalt Outdoor furniture


I took if for a test drive and darned if it didn't work great. I am pleased with the result. It was hard work to make this device and a new experience for me. I think it will be useful for my future projects. I coated it with BLO (AKA Danish oil) to help moderate the drying process.

Jeans Furniture Outdoor bench Table Wood


Outdoor bench Furniture Wood Outdoor furniture Plant


I hope you enjoyed and give it a try if the opportunity presents itself.

Happy Thanksgiving! :)
Sylvain - That's an interesting method for cutting a wide mortise. Have not seen it before. I would prefer it to the augering method. I find paring the mortise gets me in trouble sometimes.
 

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Installing the Clamp and Conclusion

Time to wrap up this build. The last bit is to install the clamp. This is tricky and you have options. You can decide how close you want to clamp to the end of the ramp. You can also decide the opening height of the clamp which determines the size of the workpiece it can hold. To some extent, the height can be adjusted by boring another hole in the arm, but the slots may need to be extended.

The ramp should be firmly in place for this operation, but not pegged yet. You will want to remove the ramp to cut the slots for the clamp arm. Eventually, the ramp gets pegged to the base with two wooden pegs at opposing angles. For this part of the operation, I temporarily nailed the ramp in place. I laid the base on its side and positioned the clamp in my desired position and marked the extremes for the slots in the ramp and base.

Road surface Wood Asphalt Automotive tire Composite material


Shoe Wood Boats and boating--Equipment and supplies Road surface Grass


I bring the lines for the extremes of the arm travel across the tops of the ramp and base. Then I laid out the 2" wide slots for the arm in each piece. I used the 2" leg of the square to mark it out. For the base, I bored out the ends with the auger and chiseled out the middle. I clamped a batten on the bottom to avoid too much blowout. It was difficult to bore the 1" holes in the green wood because the hole closes up on the auger and creates a lot of friction. I also angled the ends to match the arm position for the extremes. Luckily, I encountered a knot that made it even more fun to auger and chisel, but it came out OK in the end.

Outerwear Wood Sleeve Textile Dress


Wood Road surface Asphalt Bicycle tire Grass


Wood Chair Hardwood Natural material Electric blue


Wood Automotive tire Wood stain Hardwood Road surface


Wood Artifact Art Electric blue Font


For the ramp, I cut the slot on the workbench with the chisel as if it were a mortise. It worked fine and it was pretty quick and efficient. Again, I angled the ends to match the arm positions. I did it all from one side with a scrap underneath to protect the bench. It made a fairly crisp clean slot in the green wood.

Table Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Plank


Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


Table Wood Wood stain Natural material Hardwood


Tableware Wood Rectangle Table Wood stain


Finally, I pegged the ramp in place (just one peg for now), positioned the clamp arm in place with the base on its side, shimmed everything in position and bored a 1/2 inch hole for the pivot rod.

Plant Road surface Wood Asphalt Outdoor bench


Table Wood Wood stain Plank Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture Flooring Hardwood


Wood Tradesman Road surface Asphalt Outdoor bench


With the clamp arm installed on the pivot rod, I marked off the final length and trimmed the end for clearance above the ground. Then I used an off cut from the log to fashion a foot platform and cut a slot in similar fashion to the ramp slot. I also beveled the end for extra clearance above the ground. I added a dowel rod to the clamp arm to keep the platform in place.

Wood Natural material Creative arts Hardwood Lumber


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table Pattern


Table Wood Tool Drilling Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Waste container Table Wood Waste containment Hardwood


Outdoor bench Wood Road surface Asphalt Outdoor furniture


I took if for a test drive and darned if it didn't work great. I am pleased with the result. It was hard work to make this device and a new experience for me. I think it will be useful for my future projects. I coated it with BLO (AKA Danish oil) to help moderate the drying process.

Jeans Furniture Outdoor bench Table Wood


Outdoor bench Furniture Wood Outdoor furniture Plant


I hope you enjoyed and give it a try if the opportunity presents itself.

Happy Thanksgiving! :)
Thanks for sharing. Planning to start one this weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Installing the Clamp and Conclusion

Time to wrap up this build. The last bit is to install the clamp. This is tricky and you have options. You can decide how close you want to clamp to the end of the ramp. You can also decide the opening height of the clamp which determines the size of the workpiece it can hold. To some extent, the height can be adjusted by boring another hole in the arm, but the slots may need to be extended.

The ramp should be firmly in place for this operation, but not pegged yet. You will want to remove the ramp to cut the slots for the clamp arm. Eventually, the ramp gets pegged to the base with two wooden pegs at opposing angles. For this part of the operation, I temporarily nailed the ramp in place. I laid the base on its side and positioned the clamp in my desired position and marked the extremes for the slots in the ramp and base.

Road surface Wood Asphalt Automotive tire Composite material


Shoe Wood Boats and boating--Equipment and supplies Road surface Grass


I bring the lines for the extremes of the arm travel across the tops of the ramp and base. Then I laid out the 2" wide slots for the arm in each piece. I used the 2" leg of the square to mark it out. For the base, I bored out the ends with the auger and chiseled out the middle. I clamped a batten on the bottom to avoid too much blowout. It was difficult to bore the 1" holes in the green wood because the hole closes up on the auger and creates a lot of friction. I also angled the ends to match the arm position for the extremes. Luckily, I encountered a knot that made it even more fun to auger and chisel, but it came out OK in the end.

Outerwear Wood Sleeve Textile Dress


Wood Road surface Asphalt Bicycle tire Grass


Wood Chair Hardwood Natural material Electric blue


Wood Automotive tire Wood stain Hardwood Road surface


Wood Artifact Art Electric blue Font


For the ramp, I cut the slot on the workbench with the chisel as if it were a mortise. It worked fine and it was pretty quick and efficient. Again, I angled the ends to match the arm positions. I did it all from one side with a scrap underneath to protect the bench. It made a fairly crisp clean slot in the green wood.

Table Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Plank


Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


Table Wood Wood stain Natural material Hardwood


Tableware Wood Rectangle Table Wood stain


Finally, I pegged the ramp in place (just one peg for now), positioned the clamp arm in place with the base on its side, shimmed everything in position and bored a 1/2 inch hole for the pivot rod.

Plant Road surface Wood Asphalt Outdoor bench


Table Wood Wood stain Plank Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture Flooring Hardwood


Wood Tradesman Road surface Asphalt Outdoor bench


With the clamp arm installed on the pivot rod, I marked off the final length and trimmed the end for clearance above the ground. Then I used an off cut from the log to fashion a foot platform and cut a slot in similar fashion to the ramp slot. I also beveled the end for extra clearance above the ground. I added a dowel rod to the clamp arm to keep the platform in place.

Wood Natural material Creative arts Hardwood Lumber


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table Pattern


Table Wood Tool Drilling Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Waste container Table Wood Waste containment Hardwood


Outdoor bench Wood Road surface Asphalt Outdoor furniture


I took if for a test drive and darned if it didn't work great. I am pleased with the result. It was hard work to make this device and a new experience for me. I think it will be useful for my future projects. I coated it with BLO (AKA Danish oil) to help moderate the drying process.

Jeans Furniture Outdoor bench Table Wood


Outdoor bench Furniture Wood Outdoor furniture Plant


I hope you enjoyed and give it a try if the opportunity presents itself.

Happy Thanksgiving! :)
Good luck Steve!
 

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99 Posts
Installing the Clamp and Conclusion

Time to wrap up this build. The last bit is to install the clamp. This is tricky and you have options. You can decide how close you want to clamp to the end of the ramp. You can also decide the opening height of the clamp which determines the size of the workpiece it can hold. To some extent, the height can be adjusted by boring another hole in the arm, but the slots may need to be extended.

The ramp should be firmly in place for this operation, but not pegged yet. You will want to remove the ramp to cut the slots for the clamp arm. Eventually, the ramp gets pegged to the base with two wooden pegs at opposing angles. For this part of the operation, I temporarily nailed the ramp in place. I laid the base on its side and positioned the clamp in my desired position and marked the extremes for the slots in the ramp and base.

Road surface Wood Asphalt Automotive tire Composite material


Shoe Wood Boats and boating--Equipment and supplies Road surface Grass


I bring the lines for the extremes of the arm travel across the tops of the ramp and base. Then I laid out the 2" wide slots for the arm in each piece. I used the 2" leg of the square to mark it out. For the base, I bored out the ends with the auger and chiseled out the middle. I clamped a batten on the bottom to avoid too much blowout. It was difficult to bore the 1" holes in the green wood because the hole closes up on the auger and creates a lot of friction. I also angled the ends to match the arm position for the extremes. Luckily, I encountered a knot that made it even more fun to auger and chisel, but it came out OK in the end.

Outerwear Wood Sleeve Textile Dress


Wood Road surface Asphalt Bicycle tire Grass


Wood Chair Hardwood Natural material Electric blue


Wood Automotive tire Wood stain Hardwood Road surface


Wood Artifact Art Electric blue Font


For the ramp, I cut the slot on the workbench with the chisel as if it were a mortise. It worked fine and it was pretty quick and efficient. Again, I angled the ends to match the arm positions. I did it all from one side with a scrap underneath to protect the bench. It made a fairly crisp clean slot in the green wood.

Table Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Plank


Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


Table Wood Wood stain Natural material Hardwood


Tableware Wood Rectangle Table Wood stain


Finally, I pegged the ramp in place (just one peg for now), positioned the clamp arm in place with the base on its side, shimmed everything in position and bored a 1/2 inch hole for the pivot rod.

Plant Road surface Wood Asphalt Outdoor bench


Table Wood Wood stain Plank Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Outdoor furniture Flooring Hardwood


Wood Tradesman Road surface Asphalt Outdoor bench


With the clamp arm installed on the pivot rod, I marked off the final length and trimmed the end for clearance above the ground. Then I used an off cut from the log to fashion a foot platform and cut a slot in similar fashion to the ramp slot. I also beveled the end for extra clearance above the ground. I added a dowel rod to the clamp arm to keep the platform in place.

Wood Natural material Creative arts Hardwood Lumber


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table Pattern


Table Wood Tool Drilling Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Waste container Table Wood Waste containment Hardwood


Outdoor bench Wood Road surface Asphalt Outdoor furniture


I took if for a test drive and darned if it didn't work great. I am pleased with the result. It was hard work to make this device and a new experience for me. I think it will be useful for my future projects. I coated it with BLO (AKA Danish oil) to help moderate the drying process.

Jeans Furniture Outdoor bench Table Wood


Outdoor bench Furniture Wood Outdoor furniture Plant


I hope you enjoyed and give it a try if the opportunity presents itself.

Happy Thanksgiving! :)
Excellent documentation! Thanks.
 

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