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Hi Guys

I am new here but and am please to be here. I have a question about my Stanley handplane #50. I got it from a antique shop near me. Lucky for me all the cutters were included. My problem is that my tongue and groove cutter are off. I mean the right cutter is fraction longer that that of the left side. You arn't see it with your eyes but planing it on wood you immediately sees it. The right cutter is doing the job while the left one does nothing but the skate is sliding on the surface. I tried to adjust it but there is noway to adjust unless to reshape the cutters by sharping more on the left to get it level. I do have a horning jig but then it so difficult to align it in the jig. I don't want to grind and waste the cutter as I contacted serveral companies for sush cutter but was told that these cutters were not made any longer. So I am trying to be careful not the mess up the cutter. Is there a way to a accurancy sharpen it?

Thks Guys!
 

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I've heard that some carpenters sharpened them like that purposely, so the show face of the joint was always tight and the backside was not in the way if it expanded slightly differently.

However if I were you I would jise use a combo square and draw a line across the iron and grid the one side down until they are level. I don't think there's any way to get them square without a little grinding. Also, lie Nielsen may sell replacement blades. You could check eBay also.
 

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^ what wally said. Draw a line and grind (wheel or course stone/DMT) to get it square. Unless it's off by and 1/8" or so, and the cutter is already used up, there should be plenty of lifetime left after the operaiton is complete.

But before you do that…

Make sure it's the iron and not the user.

I say that because it's easy to think I'm square to an edge with my planes (jointer, joinery, etc) but the square tells me otherwise…
 

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That sounds like a solution in search of a problem to me. I prefer them to match, as the cutters on my #48 and #49 do (old Stanley planes that came that way). It already requires some mental gymnastics to keep the faces straight when the groove is not centered perfectly in the stock. Then I'd have to be concerned which leg of the cutter is longer while reading the grain of the piece and deciding which should be the show face.

Yeah, I know, it's not rocket science. But leaving one side of the groove longer to account for uneven expansion, when T&G is typically applied to the backs of carcases, seems like needless hassle.
 

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I've never read about one leg being shorter but I can see why in some cases it would be an advantage. I'd want mine even as well though. If I want one leg shorter (and I've done this) I just hit the back side leg with a block plane.
 

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I ve never read about one leg being shorter but I can see why in some cases it would be an advantage. I d want mine even as well though. If I want one leg shorter (and I ve done this) I just hit the back side leg with a block plane.

- Don W
I've done the same.
 
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