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It's simple. I turned a piece of wood to fit the credit card type card sharpeners, made a recessed tenon, and glued the card to the face of the wood. I mount it into my chuck, get a small piece of two sided tape stuck to whatever finger I'm going to use for the carbide, stick it to the carbide, and at a slow speed, about 100 rpm if you can, bring up the carbide to the spinning card for about 10 seconds. Take a look at the carbide, and it you see a dirty spot, touch it again to the card, and when it's all shiny and clean, your cutter is sharp.
I'm using the red Dia- Sharp cards that Woodcraft sells. It's 800 grit, but I'm going to make 2 more for the other grits they have.
You only have a 2" square to work in even though the card is 2×3 1/4".

This is the face. I put on way too much glue. The card is recessed almost 1/16" or .050".


This is the back. I turned a tenon recess so I could set it flat on a work surface if needed.

.............. Jerry (in Tucson)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Rick. Yep. Using just 2 square inches. I wouldn't call it stuck. I used to sit at my desk and try to get the carbide sharpened by stroking back and forth. 15-20 minutes, and still not sharp enough. Now, it's a lot better using the lathe as the driver. You just put it up against the card, and check to see that you're getting 100% contact on the cutter. When you do, it's pretty sharp. After sharpening, clean the card with a damp rag….. ..... Jerry (in Tucson)
 
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