LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I am still trying to learn the proper use and set up of hand planes and I am having some trouble. I am attempting to use the method of setting the plane on paper shims (not under the throat of course) to set the depth, but once I tighten down the cap iron (cam action) it greatly increases the blade depth and raises the plane up. What am I doing wrong? How can I fix this problem?

I don't know if it matters, but I am using a #4 smooth plane, and will be getting a block and a jointer soon.

Thanks much!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9,509 Posts
Hmmmm. I've not used the paper method. I normally just turn the plane over and sight down the body of the plane and adjust to eye. I then take a practice pass or two and adjust from there. Perhaps, you could try setting the plane down with the lever cap locked, unlock it, adjust, and then re-lock.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,489 Posts
Hi Ben,

The method you describe is the way I set a #112 or # 80 scraper. I just look on a smooth plane. Put a block of scrap wood in the vise edge up. . Make sure the grain is running away from you. Look down the plane from the front and show just a little of the iron. Make sure it is paralell with the sole of the plane. Try it. Adjust and try again. Stop when you are getting a shaving that is almost thin enough to see though and as wide as the edge of the board. If the iron is as sharp as it should be, the surface will be smoother than you can sand. It will feel SLICK.If it doesn't feel slick then you need to do more sharpening.
Good Luck,
Tom

Wayne, we were both typing at the same time. Same response. LOL
 

· Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys. I did get a video covering a few subjects that included a Mike Dunbar segment (20 minutes) about cleaning and tuning up an older plane, as well as sharpening, but obviously it is not as in depth as a video dedicated to planes.

It seems like the issue I'm having may be due to the way the iron sits on the frog (I have not flattened the frog's face) or some other type of tuning issue (like how far back the frog sits), because when I tighten the lever cap, it moves the blade out enough to make a big difference, but maybe I just need to try sighting it down. I also just got my first two waterstones (800 and 4000) along with some green honing compound, so that's the other part that I need to practice. I can hardly wait for the paper thin slivers to curl out! I have yet to experience that satisfaction.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9,509 Posts
Is the frog aligned correctly with the mouth? There could be an issue there.

I have a tuned Bedrock 605 with a hock blade and chipbreaker….. Almost addictive…..
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,832 Posts
I was thinking alignment of the blade. I have a crappy Mastercraft block plane that once the blade depth is set, tightening causes it to creep a few thousandths making it really hard to set depth.

I also set handplane depth by looking down body…practice pass and away I go.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,489 Posts
Ben, if it's no good, can it and get a Stanley Bailey. They're solid and have been at it for over a 100 years. At least you are learning about planes.If you can make a $5 flea-market special work you will be on the way to really getting into the planes. Oh, Lordy, we might have created a monster!!!!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks Thos. Angle, I will keep that in mind. I have been looking for old Stanleys/Baileys at the flea market also, but there are very few where I have gone, and overpriced for what they are too (cracked handles, missing parts, etc). I'll still look every time though.

I'm gonna take out the frog, flatten the face, then make sure it's adjusted to be flush with the back of the mouth and take it from there.

Thanks everybody.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9,509 Posts
I would agree. Ebay would be a good choice. Inspect them carefully. Look for ones that include 1910 patent dates on the body of the plane if you can (simple guidance).
 

· Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks Wayne, that's very kind. I did notice that hartville tool carries a few "economy" planes that they speak pretty highly of. If I can get my #4 in order, I may consider their jointer and block planes. What are your thoughts of these? One is a low angle block ($25), and the other is a #7 jointer ($60). I think Grizzly also carries these exact same two, but for $10 less each.


 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top