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I'd like to try turning a bowl with a segmented rim as shown here:
At 4:10 in the video, the turner uses a carbide tool to cut the inside of the segmented rim.
Question: I don't want to get into carbide tools just yet. I want to master traditional tools first. Would a very sharp bowl gouge or scraper work just as well? What worries me is those corners and what would happen to the rim if I didn't approach it correctly.
 

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Kim … Good question.

I would think if your glue joints were good and your tools are good and sharp you should be OK.

My personal preference would be to go with a bowl gouge, but you could do it with either a scraper or a parting tool.

Remember that carbide cutters (like the one used in the video) are just a form of scraper.
 

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I'm with Gerry. Carbide tools are fine, but I primarily use mine for roughing and hogging out large amounts of wood. Stick with a sharp bowl gouge and/or scraper and I think you'll be happy with the results.

As far as glue, I am a confirmed fan of Titebond II. I use it for all of my glued-up projects (Titebond III if the item is going to be subjected to weather or moisture) and have never had a failure. Spread a liberal amount, clamp and let the piece dry overnight.

Good luck!

Ron
 

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I saw a video just a few weeks back but I can't remember who it was now. :(
Lyle shows the bowl flute position in this one starting about the 2:20 mark. The flute is almost closed and you take a very fine shaving.
I would make the cut by squeezing my left hand shut very slowly to move the gouge, with the shank of the gouge almost parallel with the bed for the inside. It will take longer because it is a scraping cut but it should be safe and easy to control.

Although this is a rough log it still has corners. I would use this technique on the outside taking cuts maybe 1/16 at the time. Note, I would have the tool rest at 45* to the bed and not parallel with the bed as Lyle starts out. I want to stay out of the kill zone as much as possible.
 

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The jigs for the table saw look pretty labor intensive.
Kim … take a look at the Wedgie ( http://segeasy.com/wedgies.htm ).

I plan to build one of these myself.

They sell wedges for various angles, but you can use with a standard 30 degree triangle available at office supply and hobby store to test the sled. A 30 degree triangle will give you 12 segments per ring.
 
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