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Cutting Corners

Now that the sides are cut to length all we have to do is put a 45 degree angle on each end. The idea is to preserve the face of each side to ensure the lines come together at the corners. I just screw a board to a miter square to prevent tear out and to clamp a stop. The pictures below show that the lines not only match on the outside corners, but also the inside. Be sure to save the cut off corners. They will match the lines on the inside of the box and can be glued to reinforce the corner. For this box I used #20 biscuits.

On the bottom picture you can see how two of the lines do not quite line up when they cross on the face. This is because I didn't correct enough for the two parts slipping in the clamps. I've since learned to use a long clamp to keep them aligned.

Next blog will focus on some tips and lessons learned. I sure hope to see some more string boxes on LJs. Thanks for all the kind comments.









Wow.. I was looking for info on laminations on the web and it was here all along.
TNX..TNX.TNX.TNX.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Secret Soss

While I still plan to do a series on my experiences with various box hinges, I thought I'd go ahead and post how I installed Soss hinges on the current string box project. I plan to include the usual step-by-step process, but I think most folks will get the idea from these pictures.

The sides of this box are a little over 3/4" wide so I'm using the Soss 203 hinges which are 1/2" X 1 3/4. These hinges require eight, count 'em, eight! mortises. And they all have to be perfectly lined up relative to the sides of the box and the back in order for the lid to be flush with the box. The picture below is a dry fit straight from the jig with no fussing. I think the pictures tell the story so if you have any questions please let me know.











 

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Secret Soss

While I still plan to do a series on my experiences with various box hinges, I thought I'd go ahead and post how I installed Soss hinges on the current string box project. I plan to include the usual step-by-step process, but I think most folks will get the idea from these pictures.

The sides of this box are a little over 3/4" wide so I'm using the Soss 203 hinges which are 1/2" X 1 3/4. These hinges require eight, count 'em, eight! mortises. And they all have to be perfectly lined up relative to the sides of the box and the back in order for the lid to be flush with the box. The picture below is a dry fit straight from the jig with no fussing. I think the pictures tell the story so if you have any questions please let me know.











Those jigs are pretty sweet. It all came out looking pretty incredible.
 

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Secret Soss

While I still plan to do a series on my experiences with various box hinges, I thought I'd go ahead and post how I installed Soss hinges on the current string box project. I plan to include the usual step-by-step process, but I think most folks will get the idea from these pictures.

The sides of this box are a little over 3/4" wide so I'm using the Soss 203 hinges which are 1/2" X 1 3/4. These hinges require eight, count 'em, eight! mortises. And they all have to be perfectly lined up relative to the sides of the box and the back in order for the lid to be flush with the box. The picture below is a dry fit straight from the jig with no fussing. I think the pictures tell the story so if you have any questions please let me know.











I love the boxes. What interesting jigs! They look very interesting!
Ellen
 

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Secret Soss

While I still plan to do a series on my experiences with various box hinges, I thought I'd go ahead and post how I installed Soss hinges on the current string box project. I plan to include the usual step-by-step process, but I think most folks will get the idea from these pictures.

The sides of this box are a little over 3/4" wide so I'm using the Soss 203 hinges which are 1/2" X 1 3/4. These hinges require eight, count 'em, eight! mortises. And they all have to be perfectly lined up relative to the sides of the box and the back in order for the lid to be flush with the box. The picture below is a dry fit straight from the jig with no fussing. I think the pictures tell the story so if you have any questions please let me know.











I like those hinge , but you lost me in the picturebook
well I gess the day I need it I figur it out…LOL
for now I go the oldschoolway but it sure looks interressting :)

Dennis
 

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Secret Soss

While I still plan to do a series on my experiences with various box hinges, I thought I'd go ahead and post how I installed Soss hinges on the current string box project. I plan to include the usual step-by-step process, but I think most folks will get the idea from these pictures.

The sides of this box are a little over 3/4" wide so I'm using the Soss 203 hinges which are 1/2" X 1 3/4. These hinges require eight, count 'em, eight! mortises. And they all have to be perfectly lined up relative to the sides of the box and the back in order for the lid to be flush with the box. The picture below is a dry fit straight from the jig with no fussing. I think the pictures tell the story so if you have any questions please let me know.











good work …that's a sweet looking box you got there
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
Secret Soss

While I still plan to do a series on my experiences with various box hinges, I thought I'd go ahead and post how I installed Soss hinges on the current string box project. I plan to include the usual step-by-step process, but I think most folks will get the idea from these pictures.

The sides of this box are a little over 3/4" wide so I'm using the Soss 203 hinges which are 1/2" X 1 3/4. These hinges require eight, count 'em, eight! mortises. And they all have to be perfectly lined up relative to the sides of the box and the back in order for the lid to be flush with the box. The picture below is a dry fit straight from the jig with no fussing. I think the pictures tell the story so if you have any questions please let me know.











Thanks all. Dennis… I don't know where I lost you, but here's how the jig works. You mark matching centerlines across both the box and lid which are the same distance from the edge (side of the box). These lines represent the center of the hinge mortise. The jig is registered against the outside of the box with the fence and on the inside with a centerline. The jig uses a 5/8" guide bushing and for the Soss 203, a 1/2" bit. You place the router on the jig and zero the bit height to the bottom of the jig (ie you push it down until the bit stops). You then use the top (wide mortise) part of the hinge to set the depth guage/stop for (about 1/4").

Raise the bit up, plug in the router, and make your first mortise cut. I like to make a series of plunge cuts then clean out the mortise with a final pass. Go slow, be gentle, don't force the router. I also spray some lubricant on the jig to help the router but you could also use wax. Turn the router off, raise the bit, and lift it out. Flip the other half of the jig over on top of the bottom plate. You will repeat the process, however, you will have to first reset for the depth of cut. Notice that the top mortise is smaller than the bottom?

You place the router back on the jig, zero out the bit (which is now being zeroed to the bottom of the first mortise). The specs say the Soss 203 is 3/4" deep, but I like to cut a hair deeper and make the bottom mortise a little wider so it fits easier. I use a 1/2" block or spacer to re-set the depth gauge (actually slightly more than 1/2"), raise the bit, and make the second cut in the same manner as the first. Then I repeat this for the other three (six actually) mortises.

A couple of tips. Make sure the jig is very secure on the part being mortised. Any slippage will cause the hinge to not fit or worse. Work deliberately, slow down, make sure you complete each step. It is easy to forget to re-set the depth gauge and cut the top mortise too deep. If your mortise is too wide you can adjust (tighten) the jig with layers of tape on the ends. Note: this won't help you until your next mortise which is a good reason to do practice and/or test cuts.

I will post a more detailed blog showing how I make the jig. In the meantime I hope this helps.
 

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Secret Soss

While I still plan to do a series on my experiences with various box hinges, I thought I'd go ahead and post how I installed Soss hinges on the current string box project. I plan to include the usual step-by-step process, but I think most folks will get the idea from these pictures.

The sides of this box are a little over 3/4" wide so I'm using the Soss 203 hinges which are 1/2" X 1 3/4. These hinges require eight, count 'em, eight! mortises. And they all have to be perfectly lined up relative to the sides of the box and the back in order for the lid to be flush with the box. The picture below is a dry fit straight from the jig with no fussing. I think the pictures tell the story so if you have any questions please let me know.











thank´s Tim I bookmark it for to be used later :)
and by the way the box is very beautyfull
thank´s once more
Dennis
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
Oh No!

I wonder if the Mona Lisa's smile was a cover up for a mistake. Seems like I've gotten pretty good at making mistakes in the shop. Hopefully, I've gotten just as good at fixing them.

It wasn't the Mortise Pal's fault. I was getting so wrapped up in my photo journalism that I made a common mistake. I lined the centerline of the jig with the wrong line on the target! As you can see from the pictures, instead of lining the jig up on the center I lined it up on one of the outside lines, with predictable results. Oh well, time for a design change. Fortunately I had not yet made the lid's handle so I could still shape it to fit. First I had to fix the mortise. For this error I decided that two mistakes are better than one and simply cut another mortise centering the jig on the other outside line. This gave me a larger mortise than I had originally planned but it seemed to work out. You be the judge.





Aaaaaaaaargh! The Mortise Pal does give a clean and accurate cut, at least when you line it up correctly to begin with.



No worries.



Not shown in the picture below, I first used a dado set (actually box joint blades), to trim the edge of the handle to fit in the mortise. You can barely see this on the bottom of the piece following. Then one of several dry fits before cutting, shaping, and sanding. This is the shape I had had in mind from the start. Just a little wider than I had planned.





I did draw a couple of arcs using a pie tin, but ended up using these as a rough guide and drew a shape free hand. I used my eye to do the rough shaping with a rasp before fine tuning the shape with the spindle sander. It is remarkable how accurate your eyes can be. Especially with bifocal contacts.







 

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Oh No!

I wonder if the Mona Lisa's smile was a cover up for a mistake. Seems like I've gotten pretty good at making mistakes in the shop. Hopefully, I've gotten just as good at fixing them.

It wasn't the Mortise Pal's fault. I was getting so wrapped up in my photo journalism that I made a common mistake. I lined the centerline of the jig with the wrong line on the target! As you can see from the pictures, instead of lining the jig up on the center I lined it up on one of the outside lines, with predictable results. Oh well, time for a design change. Fortunately I had not yet made the lid's handle so I could still shape it to fit. First I had to fix the mortise. For this error I decided that two mistakes are better than one and simply cut another mortise centering the jig on the other outside line. This gave me a larger mortise than I had originally planned but it seemed to work out. You be the judge.





Aaaaaaaaargh! The Mortise Pal does give a clean and accurate cut, at least when you line it up correctly to begin with.



No worries.



Not shown in the picture below, I first used a dado set (actually box joint blades), to trim the edge of the handle to fit in the mortise. You can barely see this on the bottom of the piece following. Then one of several dry fits before cutting, shaping, and sanding. This is the shape I had had in mind from the start. Just a little wider than I had planned.





I did draw a couple of arcs using a pie tin, but ended up using these as a rough guide and drew a shape free hand. I used my eye to do the rough shaping with a rasp before fine tuning the shape with the spindle sander. It is remarkable how accurate your eyes can be. Especially with bifocal contacts.







If you wouldn't have said anything no one would have known, it looks good to me. But I like to see how people fix their design adjustments. I really like the handle, I also like the Mortise Pal great looking jig.
 

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Oh No!

I wonder if the Mona Lisa's smile was a cover up for a mistake. Seems like I've gotten pretty good at making mistakes in the shop. Hopefully, I've gotten just as good at fixing them.

It wasn't the Mortise Pal's fault. I was getting so wrapped up in my photo journalism that I made a common mistake. I lined the centerline of the jig with the wrong line on the target! As you can see from the pictures, instead of lining the jig up on the center I lined it up on one of the outside lines, with predictable results. Oh well, time for a design change. Fortunately I had not yet made the lid's handle so I could still shape it to fit. First I had to fix the mortise. For this error I decided that two mistakes are better than one and simply cut another mortise centering the jig on the other outside line. This gave me a larger mortise than I had originally planned but it seemed to work out. You be the judge.





Aaaaaaaaargh! The Mortise Pal does give a clean and accurate cut, at least when you line it up correctly to begin with.



No worries.



Not shown in the picture below, I first used a dado set (actually box joint blades), to trim the edge of the handle to fit in the mortise. You can barely see this on the bottom of the piece following. Then one of several dry fits before cutting, shaping, and sanding. This is the shape I had had in mind from the start. Just a little wider than I had planned.





I did draw a couple of arcs using a pie tin, but ended up using these as a rough guide and drew a shape free hand. I used my eye to do the rough shaping with a rasp before fine tuning the shape with the spindle sander. It is remarkable how accurate your eyes can be. Especially with bifocal contacts.







Certainly made lemonade from that lemon!!!
Love the result!
 

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Oh No!

I wonder if the Mona Lisa's smile was a cover up for a mistake. Seems like I've gotten pretty good at making mistakes in the shop. Hopefully, I've gotten just as good at fixing them.

It wasn't the Mortise Pal's fault. I was getting so wrapped up in my photo journalism that I made a common mistake. I lined the centerline of the jig with the wrong line on the target! As you can see from the pictures, instead of lining the jig up on the center I lined it up on one of the outside lines, with predictable results. Oh well, time for a design change. Fortunately I had not yet made the lid's handle so I could still shape it to fit. First I had to fix the mortise. For this error I decided that two mistakes are better than one and simply cut another mortise centering the jig on the other outside line. This gave me a larger mortise than I had originally planned but it seemed to work out. You be the judge.





Aaaaaaaaargh! The Mortise Pal does give a clean and accurate cut, at least when you line it up correctly to begin with.



No worries.



Not shown in the picture below, I first used a dado set (actually box joint blades), to trim the edge of the handle to fit in the mortise. You can barely see this on the bottom of the piece following. Then one of several dry fits before cutting, shaping, and sanding. This is the shape I had had in mind from the start. Just a little wider than I had planned.





I did draw a couple of arcs using a pie tin, but ended up using these as a rough guide and drew a shape free hand. I used my eye to do the rough shaping with a rasp before fine tuning the shape with the spindle sander. It is remarkable how accurate your eyes can be. Especially with bifocal contacts.







That is looking really nice. I like the handle.
I agree about the human eye. It is incredible at matching things and finding the center line.

Steve
 

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Oh No!

I wonder if the Mona Lisa's smile was a cover up for a mistake. Seems like I've gotten pretty good at making mistakes in the shop. Hopefully, I've gotten just as good at fixing them.

It wasn't the Mortise Pal's fault. I was getting so wrapped up in my photo journalism that I made a common mistake. I lined the centerline of the jig with the wrong line on the target! As you can see from the pictures, instead of lining the jig up on the center I lined it up on one of the outside lines, with predictable results. Oh well, time for a design change. Fortunately I had not yet made the lid's handle so I could still shape it to fit. First I had to fix the mortise. For this error I decided that two mistakes are better than one and simply cut another mortise centering the jig on the other outside line. This gave me a larger mortise than I had originally planned but it seemed to work out. You be the judge.





Aaaaaaaaargh! The Mortise Pal does give a clean and accurate cut, at least when you line it up correctly to begin with.



No worries.



Not shown in the picture below, I first used a dado set (actually box joint blades), to trim the edge of the handle to fit in the mortise. You can barely see this on the bottom of the piece following. Then one of several dry fits before cutting, shaping, and sanding. This is the shape I had had in mind from the start. Just a little wider than I had planned.





I did draw a couple of arcs using a pie tin, but ended up using these as a rough guide and drew a shape free hand. I used my eye to do the rough shaping with a rasp before fine tuning the shape with the spindle sander. It is remarkable how accurate your eyes can be. Especially with bifocal contacts.







This is the difference between a woodworker and a craftsman..
How to disguise mistakes..
TNX
 

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Oh No!

I wonder if the Mona Lisa's smile was a cover up for a mistake. Seems like I've gotten pretty good at making mistakes in the shop. Hopefully, I've gotten just as good at fixing them.

It wasn't the Mortise Pal's fault. I was getting so wrapped up in my photo journalism that I made a common mistake. I lined the centerline of the jig with the wrong line on the target! As you can see from the pictures, instead of lining the jig up on the center I lined it up on one of the outside lines, with predictable results. Oh well, time for a design change. Fortunately I had not yet made the lid's handle so I could still shape it to fit. First I had to fix the mortise. For this error I decided that two mistakes are better than one and simply cut another mortise centering the jig on the other outside line. This gave me a larger mortise than I had originally planned but it seemed to work out. You be the judge.





Aaaaaaaaargh! The Mortise Pal does give a clean and accurate cut, at least when you line it up correctly to begin with.



No worries.



Not shown in the picture below, I first used a dado set (actually box joint blades), to trim the edge of the handle to fit in the mortise. You can barely see this on the bottom of the piece following. Then one of several dry fits before cutting, shaping, and sanding. This is the shape I had had in mind from the start. Just a little wider than I had planned.





I did draw a couple of arcs using a pie tin, but ended up using these as a rough guide and drew a shape free hand. I used my eye to do the rough shaping with a rasp before fine tuning the shape with the spindle sander. It is remarkable how accurate your eyes can be. Especially with bifocal contacts.







simple fix, to a little problem.
 

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Oh No!

I wonder if the Mona Lisa's smile was a cover up for a mistake. Seems like I've gotten pretty good at making mistakes in the shop. Hopefully, I've gotten just as good at fixing them.

It wasn't the Mortise Pal's fault. I was getting so wrapped up in my photo journalism that I made a common mistake. I lined the centerline of the jig with the wrong line on the target! As you can see from the pictures, instead of lining the jig up on the center I lined it up on one of the outside lines, with predictable results. Oh well, time for a design change. Fortunately I had not yet made the lid's handle so I could still shape it to fit. First I had to fix the mortise. For this error I decided that two mistakes are better than one and simply cut another mortise centering the jig on the other outside line. This gave me a larger mortise than I had originally planned but it seemed to work out. You be the judge.





Aaaaaaaaargh! The Mortise Pal does give a clean and accurate cut, at least when you line it up correctly to begin with.



No worries.



Not shown in the picture below, I first used a dado set (actually box joint blades), to trim the edge of the handle to fit in the mortise. You can barely see this on the bottom of the piece following. Then one of several dry fits before cutting, shaping, and sanding. This is the shape I had had in mind from the start. Just a little wider than I had planned.





I did draw a couple of arcs using a pie tin, but ended up using these as a rough guide and drew a shape free hand. I used my eye to do the rough shaping with a rasp before fine tuning the shape with the spindle sander. It is remarkable how accurate your eyes can be. Especially with bifocal contacts.







Great job and nice recovery! I respect the fact you shared a mistake like we all do from time to time and showed us how you recovered. Well done thx for the info!
 
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