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Laminate The Strings

I've prepped over thirty pictures so far so I tried to break them up into logical groups. The first part is to laminate the strings. For this box I'm using the re-saw technique and start with a thick piece of wenge (8/4) milled flat and square. I re-sawed some strips of maple and ran them through the drum sander for thickness and to remove any larger saw marks. I made a single rip cut on the wenge with a gentle random curve on the bandsaw and glued a thin strip of maple in between the two parts and clamped them tight. Try to keep the bottom of the boards flat as this will save some planing later on. Also, I avoid making any sharp or compound curves to make the glue up easier. One option if you make tight curves is to use thinner strips. You can double or triple up on the strips using the same wood type for a thicker line, or mix colors for a different effect. Another tip when crossing strings is to keep the ends of the block in alignment when clamping. Again, you can use a long clamp to keep it square (not pictured here). I got a question about whether I needed to smooth the surfaces of the curves in order to get a tight fit and sharp edges. No, not really. I just took them straight from the bandsaw to the clamps. I think the trick is to make gentle curves with a continuous cut and even feed rate. You can smooth the surfaces with a flexible sanding block or use a scraper. It could also be that the glue caused the maple strips to swell up and cover any small defects. Don't know.

I usually let the glue set up for thirty minutes or so then scrape off the squeeze out. Once it has set up awhile I simply make another random curved rip cut on the bandsaw and repeat the lamination steps until I have all the strips in place that I want. One thing to notice is I experimented with cutting curves that go from an end to a side, instead of end to end, thus cutting off a corner. The two parts will slip out of alignment in the clamps so I just use a long clamp end-to-end to keep everything in place. When all the lamination is complete I trim any flaps (maple strips) at the bandsaw or with a handsaw, the use normal milling techniques at the jointer, planer, and table saw to square it up and flatten and smooth the surfaces just like any other piece of rough lumber.

On this box I will grain match all the sides as well as match the strings. Next blog I'll do the re-sawing and book-matching.







Brilliant concept! Can't wait to see the remainder of the tutorial.

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Laminate The Strings

I've prepped over thirty pictures so far so I tried to break them up into logical groups. The first part is to laminate the strings. For this box I'm using the re-saw technique and start with a thick piece of wenge (8/4) milled flat and square. I re-sawed some strips of maple and ran them through the drum sander for thickness and to remove any larger saw marks. I made a single rip cut on the wenge with a gentle random curve on the bandsaw and glued a thin strip of maple in between the two parts and clamped them tight. Try to keep the bottom of the boards flat as this will save some planing later on. Also, I avoid making any sharp or compound curves to make the glue up easier. One option if you make tight curves is to use thinner strips. You can double or triple up on the strips using the same wood type for a thicker line, or mix colors for a different effect. Another tip when crossing strings is to keep the ends of the block in alignment when clamping. Again, you can use a long clamp to keep it square (not pictured here). I got a question about whether I needed to smooth the surfaces of the curves in order to get a tight fit and sharp edges. No, not really. I just took them straight from the bandsaw to the clamps. I think the trick is to make gentle curves with a continuous cut and even feed rate. You can smooth the surfaces with a flexible sanding block or use a scraper. It could also be that the glue caused the maple strips to swell up and cover any small defects. Don't know.

I usually let the glue set up for thirty minutes or so then scrape off the squeeze out. Once it has set up awhile I simply make another random curved rip cut on the bandsaw and repeat the lamination steps until I have all the strips in place that I want. One thing to notice is I experimented with cutting curves that go from an end to a side, instead of end to end, thus cutting off a corner. The two parts will slip out of alignment in the clamps so I just use a long clamp end-to-end to keep everything in place. When all the lamination is complete I trim any flaps (maple strips) at the bandsaw or with a handsaw, the use normal milling techniques at the jointer, planer, and table saw to square it up and flatten and smooth the surfaces just like any other piece of rough lumber.

On this box I will grain match all the sides as well as match the strings. Next blog I'll do the re-sawing and book-matching.







Thanks all. degoose… Yes! That is the (your) diamond board I finished a couple months ago. However, I have a bunch of tubes cut, some glued, getting ready to crosscut. Another day, another blog.
 

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Laminate The Strings

I've prepped over thirty pictures so far so I tried to break them up into logical groups. The first part is to laminate the strings. For this box I'm using the re-saw technique and start with a thick piece of wenge (8/4) milled flat and square. I re-sawed some strips of maple and ran them through the drum sander for thickness and to remove any larger saw marks. I made a single rip cut on the wenge with a gentle random curve on the bandsaw and glued a thin strip of maple in between the two parts and clamped them tight. Try to keep the bottom of the boards flat as this will save some planing later on. Also, I avoid making any sharp or compound curves to make the glue up easier. One option if you make tight curves is to use thinner strips. You can double or triple up on the strips using the same wood type for a thicker line, or mix colors for a different effect. Another tip when crossing strings is to keep the ends of the block in alignment when clamping. Again, you can use a long clamp to keep it square (not pictured here). I got a question about whether I needed to smooth the surfaces of the curves in order to get a tight fit and sharp edges. No, not really. I just took them straight from the bandsaw to the clamps. I think the trick is to make gentle curves with a continuous cut and even feed rate. You can smooth the surfaces with a flexible sanding block or use a scraper. It could also be that the glue caused the maple strips to swell up and cover any small defects. Don't know.

I usually let the glue set up for thirty minutes or so then scrape off the squeeze out. Once it has set up awhile I simply make another random curved rip cut on the bandsaw and repeat the lamination steps until I have all the strips in place that I want. One thing to notice is I experimented with cutting curves that go from an end to a side, instead of end to end, thus cutting off a corner. The two parts will slip out of alignment in the clamps so I just use a long clamp end-to-end to keep everything in place. When all the lamination is complete I trim any flaps (maple strips) at the bandsaw or with a handsaw, the use normal milling techniques at the jointer, planer, and table saw to square it up and flatten and smooth the surfaces just like any other piece of rough lumber.

On this box I will grain match all the sides as well as match the strings. Next blog I'll do the re-sawing and book-matching.







Love those flowing lines beautiful choice of wood with the Wenge & maple, There is just so much inpiration on this site we'll all be busy for the next 50 years.
Thanks for sharing it
Trevor
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Resaw & Bookmatch

Last blog was too long on words. Pictures tell the whole story. Mark the wood with triangles to keep them aligned, resaw a little over the thickness you desire, run each through the planer at the same thickness and bookmatch the parts. Note: if you are using real thick wood like 8/4, you can slice four pieces and have enough material for two boxes.











 

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Resaw & Bookmatch

Last blog was too long on words. Pictures tell the whole story. Mark the wood with triangles to keep them aligned, resaw a little over the thickness you desire, run each through the planer at the same thickness and bookmatch the parts. Note: if you are using real thick wood like 8/4, you can slice four pieces and have enough material for two boxes.











Very inavative and unique, thanks for showing us. First time I have seen a box done like that.
 

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Resaw & Bookmatch

Last blog was too long on words. Pictures tell the whole story. Mark the wood with triangles to keep them aligned, resaw a little over the thickness you desire, run each through the planer at the same thickness and bookmatch the parts. Note: if you are using real thick wood like 8/4, you can slice four pieces and have enough material for two boxes.











Very nice creativity, thanks for posting all step by step detail
 

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Resaw & Bookmatch

Last blog was too long on words. Pictures tell the whole story. Mark the wood with triangles to keep them aligned, resaw a little over the thickness you desire, run each through the planer at the same thickness and bookmatch the parts. Note: if you are using real thick wood like 8/4, you can slice four pieces and have enough material for two boxes.











This is an excellent blog! I am looking forward to each episode.
I love the string boxes you've done.
 

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Resaw & Bookmatch

Last blog was too long on words. Pictures tell the whole story. Mark the wood with triangles to keep them aligned, resaw a little over the thickness you desire, run each through the planer at the same thickness and bookmatch the parts. Note: if you are using real thick wood like 8/4, you can slice four pieces and have enough material for two boxes.











The bookmatching of the maple in the last picture is an absolutely stunning pattern!
 

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Resaw & Bookmatch

Last blog was too long on words. Pictures tell the whole story. Mark the wood with triangles to keep them aligned, resaw a little over the thickness you desire, run each through the planer at the same thickness and bookmatch the parts. Note: if you are using real thick wood like 8/4, you can slice four pieces and have enough material for two boxes.











Your string designs are very pretty, especially when revealed the bookmatch. What kind of blade do you have in your bandsaw? Your blog makes me want one of those Rikons.

Jake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Resaw & Bookmatch

Last blog was too long on words. Pictures tell the whole story. Mark the wood with triangles to keep them aligned, resaw a little over the thickness you desire, run each through the planer at the same thickness and bookmatch the parts. Note: if you are using real thick wood like 8/4, you can slice four pieces and have enough material for two boxes.











Thanks all… Chinitorama, I really like the Rikon Deluxe. I can't remember what blade I'm using. Maybe a Wolf? Anyway it is 1/4" wide and a pleasure to use. I've used wider blades, but have had the best outcomes with this thinner one. I've been able to cut some real thin veneers that are still thick enough to sand without punching through. In fact, that's how I did the lid on this box and I still have a couple slices left over. BTW, I do have the Carter guides and they really help.
 

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Resaw & Bookmatch

Last blog was too long on words. Pictures tell the whole story. Mark the wood with triangles to keep them aligned, resaw a little over the thickness you desire, run each through the planer at the same thickness and bookmatch the parts. Note: if you are using real thick wood like 8/4, you can slice four pieces and have enough material for two boxes.











the book matched pieces make a nice box too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Here's the good part: wood wrap

Here's where the magic happens. After all the milling and ripping and glueing and re-sawing, we finally get to see if we can really match the lines all around the box. Sure we can. After planing each piece to thickness and ensuring the ends are square, open them up in a book-match. Draw a chalk line at the approximate width of each of the boxes' ends from opposite ends (this is just to identify the parts). The pictures below explain it better than I can in words. I like to label each piece clockwise A, B, C, D, so when the sides and ends are tilted up the letters are also right side up.

Now all you have to do is cut the same width from opposite ends of each piece. These will become the ends of the box. Don't make any more than these two cuts. This is where a thin kerf blade will help with the final result. Rotate each of the sides and stand them up and viola! Notice that the wood grain also lines up. Next time we'll cut the corners and the box takes shape.















 

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Here's the good part: wood wrap

Here's where the magic happens. After all the milling and ripping and glueing and re-sawing, we finally get to see if we can really match the lines all around the box. Sure we can. After planing each piece to thickness and ensuring the ends are square, open them up in a book-match. Draw a chalk line at the approximate width of each of the boxes' ends from opposite ends (this is just to identify the parts). The pictures below explain it better than I can in words. I like to label each piece clockwise A, B, C, D, so when the sides and ends are tilted up the letters are also right side up.

Now all you have to do is cut the same width from opposite ends of each piece. These will become the ends of the box. Don't make any more than these two cuts. This is where a thin kerf blade will help with the final result. Rotate each of the sides and stand them up and viola! Notice that the wood grain also lines up. Next time we'll cut the corners and the box takes shape.















That is just incredible. If I wasn't dyslexic I would be all over it.LOL Thanks for all the info and instructions. Can't wait to see the rest.
 

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Here's the good part: wood wrap

Here's where the magic happens. After all the milling and ripping and glueing and re-sawing, we finally get to see if we can really match the lines all around the box. Sure we can. After planing each piece to thickness and ensuring the ends are square, open them up in a book-match. Draw a chalk line at the approximate width of each of the boxes' ends from opposite ends (this is just to identify the parts). The pictures below explain it better than I can in words. I like to label each piece clockwise A, B, C, D, so when the sides and ends are tilted up the letters are also right side up.

Now all you have to do is cut the same width from opposite ends of each piece. These will become the ends of the box. Don't make any more than these two cuts. This is where a thin kerf blade will help with the final result. Rotate each of the sides and stand them up and viola! Notice that the wood grain also lines up. Next time we'll cut the corners and the box takes shape.















The old cut and switch… well documented…
 

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Here's the good part: wood wrap

Here's where the magic happens. After all the milling and ripping and glueing and re-sawing, we finally get to see if we can really match the lines all around the box. Sure we can. After planing each piece to thickness and ensuring the ends are square, open them up in a book-match. Draw a chalk line at the approximate width of each of the boxes' ends from opposite ends (this is just to identify the parts). The pictures below explain it better than I can in words. I like to label each piece clockwise A, B, C, D, so when the sides and ends are tilted up the letters are also right side up.

Now all you have to do is cut the same width from opposite ends of each piece. These will become the ends of the box. Don't make any more than these two cuts. This is where a thin kerf blade will help with the final result. Rotate each of the sides and stand them up and viola! Notice that the wood grain also lines up. Next time we'll cut the corners and the box takes shape.















That is slick!
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Cutting Corners

Now that the sides are cut to length all we have to do is put a 45 degree angle on each end. The idea is to preserve the face of each side to ensure the lines come together at the corners. I just screw a board to a miter square to prevent tear out and to clamp a stop. The pictures below show that the lines not only match on the outside corners, but also the inside. Be sure to save the cut off corners. They will match the lines on the inside of the box and can be glued to reinforce the corner. For this box I used #20 biscuits.

On the bottom picture you can see how two of the lines do not quite line up when they cross on the face. This is because I didn't correct enough for the two parts slipping in the clamps. I've since learned to use a long clamp to keep them aligned.

Next blog will focus on some tips and lessons learned. I sure hope to see some more string boxes on LJs. Thanks for all the kind comments.









 

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Cutting Corners

Now that the sides are cut to length all we have to do is put a 45 degree angle on each end. The idea is to preserve the face of each side to ensure the lines come together at the corners. I just screw a board to a miter square to prevent tear out and to clamp a stop. The pictures below show that the lines not only match on the outside corners, but also the inside. Be sure to save the cut off corners. They will match the lines on the inside of the box and can be glued to reinforce the corner. For this box I used #20 biscuits.

On the bottom picture you can see how two of the lines do not quite line up when they cross on the face. This is because I didn't correct enough for the two parts slipping in the clamps. I've since learned to use a long clamp to keep them aligned.

Next blog will focus on some tips and lessons learned. I sure hope to see some more string boxes on LJs. Thanks for all the kind comments.









Cool stuff
 

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Cutting Corners

Now that the sides are cut to length all we have to do is put a 45 degree angle on each end. The idea is to preserve the face of each side to ensure the lines come together at the corners. I just screw a board to a miter square to prevent tear out and to clamp a stop. The pictures below show that the lines not only match on the outside corners, but also the inside. Be sure to save the cut off corners. They will match the lines on the inside of the box and can be glued to reinforce the corner. For this box I used #20 biscuits.

On the bottom picture you can see how two of the lines do not quite line up when they cross on the face. This is because I didn't correct enough for the two parts slipping in the clamps. I've since learned to use a long clamp to keep them aligned.

Next blog will focus on some tips and lessons learned. I sure hope to see some more string boxes on LJs. Thanks for all the kind comments.









Thanks for all your kind efforts and informative blogs, this is a definite to do box….great work once again THANKS…BC
 

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Cutting Corners

Now that the sides are cut to length all we have to do is put a 45 degree angle on each end. The idea is to preserve the face of each side to ensure the lines come together at the corners. I just screw a board to a miter square to prevent tear out and to clamp a stop. The pictures below show that the lines not only match on the outside corners, but also the inside. Be sure to save the cut off corners. They will match the lines on the inside of the box and can be glued to reinforce the corner. For this box I used #20 biscuits.

On the bottom picture you can see how two of the lines do not quite line up when they cross on the face. This is because I didn't correct enough for the two parts slipping in the clamps. I've since learned to use a long clamp to keep them aligned.

Next blog will focus on some tips and lessons learned. I sure hope to see some more string boxes on LJs. Thanks for all the kind comments.









Now that is some good stuff. It is coming out stunning. Your instructions are really well done, thanks.
 

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Cutting Corners

Now that the sides are cut to length all we have to do is put a 45 degree angle on each end. The idea is to preserve the face of each side to ensure the lines come together at the corners. I just screw a board to a miter square to prevent tear out and to clamp a stop. The pictures below show that the lines not only match on the outside corners, but also the inside. Be sure to save the cut off corners. They will match the lines on the inside of the box and can be glued to reinforce the corner. For this box I used #20 biscuits.

On the bottom picture you can see how two of the lines do not quite line up when they cross on the face. This is because I didn't correct enough for the two parts slipping in the clamps. I've since learned to use a long clamp to keep them aligned.

Next blog will focus on some tips and lessons learned. I sure hope to see some more string boxes on LJs. Thanks for all the kind comments.









even for one that not have a bandsaw or tablesaw (me) this is a great toturialserie you have made
thank´s for sharing it with us , deffently something to think about hmmm maybee possiple
with handtools…..have to wait there is already too many on the wischlist….LOL

take care
Dennis
 
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