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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





 

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Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





Really wonderful design idea, Thanks for posting
 

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Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





Good blog, Tim and an interesting technique. I might have a go at this. Thanks for posting
 

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Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





Thank you for sharing your technique
 

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Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





Interesting process.
Thanks for sharing
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





Thanks all… I'll go over the steps in the blog but the short answer is I use the sides of the box as a bending form and clamp the strips to accept the curve. Actually I just rip a gentle, random curve on the bandsaw then glue a strip between the two parts and clamp them together. Try to make sure the bottom of the two pieces are flat as can be. When it dries I just cut another curve then glue those two parts together and just keep adding strips until I have all the strips (lines) that I want. Steam bending would be a good option. Another is to just use double or triple up on thinner strips. If you use the same color wood you'd get a thicker line, but you could also use contrasting colors.

The easiest way is to use 6/4 or 8/4 wood, although you can also use 4/4 stock, cut it to lenght with square ends, then resaw it in half to get two bookmatched parts from which you then cut the ends and sides in a way that they match all the way around. Then you cut each edge 45 degrees while keeping as much of the face of each part as you can. When you make your crosscuts to make the sides and ends of the box, it is helpful to use the thinnest blade you can while keeping the cut as square as possible. A 1/8" kerf removes 1/16" from each side of the corner so depending on the steepness of the curve at that point, it is possible for the lines to be off slightly at each corner. A thin blade minimizes the error.

Save the left over corner pieces (cut offs) as you can glue these to the inside corners to reinforce the joint and as legs to support a tray. They can also be lined up in a way that the lines match on the inside of the box.

The bottom picture above with the protruding strips shows a variation on this method and is a little more complex, but as the picture shows, it is still possible to match the strips at each corner. There are three ways to wrap the wood that I know of and will go over these in the blog.

Thanks for the kind words.
 

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Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





This is great! Thank you for sharing. I am looking forward to learn more from you in the next blog.
 

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Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





Very informative blog. Thanks for posting.

God Bless
tom
 

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Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





Tim, I'm thinking of using a long board and then cutting 90 degree miters and seeing if the strips wrap around like the grain of the wood does. Is that what you do in the last photos? That seems like it gives the best match. Nice idea. I will try this on a box soon. It is similar to making 's' cutting boards.
Robert
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





Robert… Yes and no and maybe. If you are planing the strips smooth to the surface they will match. However, if you are using a single length of board you have to make sure to enter the rip cut the same distance from the bottom (or the top) and on the same angle as you exit. The two ends will have to match up when you wrap the wood. In the last picture above, the one with the strings protruding the surface, I used a single length of wood. However, I screwed up when cutting the ends so one corner doesn't line up - the one you can't see. :) I plan to cover the three ways (I know of) to wrap the wood in the blog. In the meantime here's a couple of shost that shows the strings will line up even with a 90 degree angle.



 

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Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





Wonderful box design
 

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Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





very cool!
 

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Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





Very kool, and awesome finished project. Nice detail on how-to also. Thnx for sharing
 

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Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





wow now that is an awful lot of work, but it is worth every minute of it.
 

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Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





Very ingenious idea, makes some really nice looking boxes, thanks for all your info on technique, and sharing your work with us
 

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Intro and Invitation

This summer's projects have been boxes. Lots and lots of boxes. Somewhere along the way I got the idea of combining the wrapping technique with a simple inlay to see how hard it would be to align the lines all around the box. In other words, at the corners. Turns out it is not that hard to do. So I've been experimenting. I've posted the first completed boxes as a Project and will post more upon completion. The photos below give an overview of this technique and the pictures at the bottom show the idea taken to the extreme. I plan to expand on these in future installments. But in the meantime, and since I love to learn and 20,000 or so of you know more than me, I'd like to extend and invitation to give this a try. I don't have time to experiment with all the combinations so between me and a few thousand friends I'm sure we can come up with a few creative options. One idea is to combine this technique with the carved art box construction. It might render some real interesting and creative results.





I used to use this technique with veneer in boat building, your application is a lot lot prettier though
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Laminate The Strings

I've prepped over thirty pictures so far so I tried to break them up into logical groups. The first part is to laminate the strings. For this box I'm using the re-saw technique and start with a thick piece of wenge (8/4) milled flat and square. I re-sawed some strips of maple and ran them through the drum sander for thickness and to remove any larger saw marks. I made a single rip cut on the wenge with a gentle random curve on the bandsaw and glued a thin strip of maple in between the two parts and clamped them tight. Try to keep the bottom of the boards flat as this will save some planing later on. Also, I avoid making any sharp or compound curves to make the glue up easier. One option if you make tight curves is to use thinner strips. You can double or triple up on the strips using the same wood type for a thicker line, or mix colors for a different effect. Another tip when crossing strings is to keep the ends of the block in alignment when clamping. Again, you can use a long clamp to keep it square (not pictured here). I got a question about whether I needed to smooth the surfaces of the curves in order to get a tight fit and sharp edges. No, not really. I just took them straight from the bandsaw to the clamps. I think the trick is to make gentle curves with a continuous cut and even feed rate. You can smooth the surfaces with a flexible sanding block or use a scraper. It could also be that the glue caused the maple strips to swell up and cover any small defects. Don't know.

I usually let the glue set up for thirty minutes or so then scrape off the squeeze out. Once it has set up awhile I simply make another random curved rip cut on the bandsaw and repeat the lamination steps until I have all the strips in place that I want. One thing to notice is I experimented with cutting curves that go from an end to a side, instead of end to end, thus cutting off a corner. The two parts will slip out of alignment in the clamps so I just use a long clamp end-to-end to keep everything in place. When all the lamination is complete I trim any flaps (maple strips) at the bandsaw or with a handsaw, the use normal milling techniques at the jointer, planer, and table saw to square it up and flatten and smooth the surfaces just like any other piece of rough lumber.

On this box I will grain match all the sides as well as match the strings. Next blog I'll do the re-sawing and book-matching.







 

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Laminate The Strings

I've prepped over thirty pictures so far so I tried to break them up into logical groups. The first part is to laminate the strings. For this box I'm using the re-saw technique and start with a thick piece of wenge (8/4) milled flat and square. I re-sawed some strips of maple and ran them through the drum sander for thickness and to remove any larger saw marks. I made a single rip cut on the wenge with a gentle random curve on the bandsaw and glued a thin strip of maple in between the two parts and clamped them tight. Try to keep the bottom of the boards flat as this will save some planing later on. Also, I avoid making any sharp or compound curves to make the glue up easier. One option if you make tight curves is to use thinner strips. You can double or triple up on the strips using the same wood type for a thicker line, or mix colors for a different effect. Another tip when crossing strings is to keep the ends of the block in alignment when clamping. Again, you can use a long clamp to keep it square (not pictured here). I got a question about whether I needed to smooth the surfaces of the curves in order to get a tight fit and sharp edges. No, not really. I just took them straight from the bandsaw to the clamps. I think the trick is to make gentle curves with a continuous cut and even feed rate. You can smooth the surfaces with a flexible sanding block or use a scraper. It could also be that the glue caused the maple strips to swell up and cover any small defects. Don't know.

I usually let the glue set up for thirty minutes or so then scrape off the squeeze out. Once it has set up awhile I simply make another random curved rip cut on the bandsaw and repeat the lamination steps until I have all the strips in place that I want. One thing to notice is I experimented with cutting curves that go from an end to a side, instead of end to end, thus cutting off a corner. The two parts will slip out of alignment in the clamps so I just use a long clamp end-to-end to keep everything in place. When all the lamination is complete I trim any flaps (maple strips) at the bandsaw or with a handsaw, the use normal milling techniques at the jointer, planer, and table saw to square it up and flatten and smooth the surfaces just like any other piece of rough lumber.

On this box I will grain match all the sides as well as match the strings. Next blog I'll do the re-sawing and book-matching.







Well done, love to see part three.
 

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Laminate The Strings

I've prepped over thirty pictures so far so I tried to break them up into logical groups. The first part is to laminate the strings. For this box I'm using the re-saw technique and start with a thick piece of wenge (8/4) milled flat and square. I re-sawed some strips of maple and ran them through the drum sander for thickness and to remove any larger saw marks. I made a single rip cut on the wenge with a gentle random curve on the bandsaw and glued a thin strip of maple in between the two parts and clamped them tight. Try to keep the bottom of the boards flat as this will save some planing later on. Also, I avoid making any sharp or compound curves to make the glue up easier. One option if you make tight curves is to use thinner strips. You can double or triple up on the strips using the same wood type for a thicker line, or mix colors for a different effect. Another tip when crossing strings is to keep the ends of the block in alignment when clamping. Again, you can use a long clamp to keep it square (not pictured here). I got a question about whether I needed to smooth the surfaces of the curves in order to get a tight fit and sharp edges. No, not really. I just took them straight from the bandsaw to the clamps. I think the trick is to make gentle curves with a continuous cut and even feed rate. You can smooth the surfaces with a flexible sanding block or use a scraper. It could also be that the glue caused the maple strips to swell up and cover any small defects. Don't know.

I usually let the glue set up for thirty minutes or so then scrape off the squeeze out. Once it has set up awhile I simply make another random curved rip cut on the bandsaw and repeat the lamination steps until I have all the strips in place that I want. One thing to notice is I experimented with cutting curves that go from an end to a side, instead of end to end, thus cutting off a corner. The two parts will slip out of alignment in the clamps so I just use a long clamp end-to-end to keep everything in place. When all the lamination is complete I trim any flaps (maple strips) at the bandsaw or with a handsaw, the use normal milling techniques at the jointer, planer, and table saw to square it up and flatten and smooth the surfaces just like any other piece of rough lumber.

On this box I will grain match all the sides as well as match the strings. Next blog I'll do the re-sawing and book-matching.







Tim,
Wow. Great idea with the contrasting woods. Seems like a natural inspiration for those of us with new band saws to experiment and create new designs. Thanks for sharing!
 

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Laminate The Strings

I've prepped over thirty pictures so far so I tried to break them up into logical groups. The first part is to laminate the strings. For this box I'm using the re-saw technique and start with a thick piece of wenge (8/4) milled flat and square. I re-sawed some strips of maple and ran them through the drum sander for thickness and to remove any larger saw marks. I made a single rip cut on the wenge with a gentle random curve on the bandsaw and glued a thin strip of maple in between the two parts and clamped them tight. Try to keep the bottom of the boards flat as this will save some planing later on. Also, I avoid making any sharp or compound curves to make the glue up easier. One option if you make tight curves is to use thinner strips. You can double or triple up on the strips using the same wood type for a thicker line, or mix colors for a different effect. Another tip when crossing strings is to keep the ends of the block in alignment when clamping. Again, you can use a long clamp to keep it square (not pictured here). I got a question about whether I needed to smooth the surfaces of the curves in order to get a tight fit and sharp edges. No, not really. I just took them straight from the bandsaw to the clamps. I think the trick is to make gentle curves with a continuous cut and even feed rate. You can smooth the surfaces with a flexible sanding block or use a scraper. It could also be that the glue caused the maple strips to swell up and cover any small defects. Don't know.

I usually let the glue set up for thirty minutes or so then scrape off the squeeze out. Once it has set up awhile I simply make another random curved rip cut on the bandsaw and repeat the lamination steps until I have all the strips in place that I want. One thing to notice is I experimented with cutting curves that go from an end to a side, instead of end to end, thus cutting off a corner. The two parts will slip out of alignment in the clamps so I just use a long clamp end-to-end to keep everything in place. When all the lamination is complete I trim any flaps (maple strips) at the bandsaw or with a handsaw, the use normal milling techniques at the jointer, planer, and table saw to square it up and flatten and smooth the surfaces just like any other piece of rough lumber.

On this box I will grain match all the sides as well as match the strings. Next blog I'll do the re-sawing and book-matching.







Cut and resaw… a good way of making a different design… I noticed the tumbling blocks in the background of Pic #2…I that the one you posted a few months ago or is it a new one..
Regards,
Larry
 
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