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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mallet - 1, Glen - 0

Dear "Saint" Roy,

Wood Symbol Hardwood Metal Plywood


Wood Rectangle Art Creative arts Beige


Rectangle Wood Flooring Beige Floor


I hate you.

Sincerely,
Mallet Muttering in Pennsylvania

---

Actually, I don't hate Roy. And I'm not that disappointed as to this first attempt.

If you haven't gotten the April 2012 issue of Popular Woodworkinghttp://www.popularwoodworking.com/apr12, you need to get it… now. They've got a great article by Roy Underhill on making the Mystery Mallet that you've been seeing around.

This actually is turning out to be a lot of fun. Before you point out the obvious, I know I shouldn't have used poplar. But I just got this nice, thick piece of poplar and thought it would be a good place to start.

Although the joint isn't totally tight, the concept is right on the money. I am very encouraged about this.

Here's what I've learned:

1. Take extra time to lay this out with a sharp pencil or marking knife.
2. It helps to have multiple marking gauges, dividers, sliding t-bevels, etc. that you can designate for one set up at a time.
3. Mark the head of your mallet and the handle with sides (A, B, C, D) and TOP, BOTTOM.
4. If you get stuck, bring the wood in the house, get a drink of water, go to bed (it will probably be around 1 a.m.) and sleep on it. :)
5. Use something other than poplar. (I have a thick piece of oak that I've set aside for something fun, like this.)

It will take a little time to get your head around these angles, slopes, joints, etc. These practice cuts have helped me get a better understanding of how this should work. Maybe tomorrow I'll cut into the oak.

Maybe.
 

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17,103 Posts
Mallet - 1, Glen - 0

Dear "Saint" Roy,

Wood Symbol Hardwood Metal Plywood


Wood Rectangle Art Creative arts Beige


Rectangle Wood Flooring Beige Floor


I hate you.

Sincerely,
Mallet Muttering in Pennsylvania

---

Actually, I don't hate Roy. And I'm not that disappointed as to this first attempt.

If you haven't gotten the April 2012 issue of Popular Woodworkinghttp://www.popularwoodworking.com/apr12, you need to get it… now. They've got a great article by Roy Underhill on making the Mystery Mallet that you've been seeing around.

This actually is turning out to be a lot of fun. Before you point out the obvious, I know I shouldn't have used poplar. But I just got this nice, thick piece of poplar and thought it would be a good place to start.

Although the joint isn't totally tight, the concept is right on the money. I am very encouraged about this.

Here's what I've learned:

1. Take extra time to lay this out with a sharp pencil or marking knife.
2. It helps to have multiple marking gauges, dividers, sliding t-bevels, etc. that you can designate for one set up at a time.
3. Mark the head of your mallet and the handle with sides (A, B, C, D) and TOP, BOTTOM.
4. If you get stuck, bring the wood in the house, get a drink of water, go to bed (it will probably be around 1 a.m.) and sleep on it. :)
5. Use something other than poplar. (I have a thick piece of oak that I've set aside for something fun, like this.)

It will take a little time to get your head around these angles, slopes, joints, etc. These practice cuts have helped me get a better understanding of how this should work. Maybe tomorrow I'll cut into the oak.

Maybe.
I made a similar mallet a few years ago. Eventually the glue joints started popping apart and I had to use screws to keep it together. I got the plan from Woodworkers Journal quite a few years ago. I'm still using, but it won't last much longer. I might be able to salvage the handle and the screws.. Mine only lasted about 8 years. Maybe the secret is the right type of glue. I hope you have better luck than I did. I hate things that don't last!

Photobucket
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Mallet - 1, Glen - 0

Dear "Saint" Roy,

Wood Symbol Hardwood Metal Plywood


Wood Rectangle Art Creative arts Beige


Rectangle Wood Flooring Beige Floor


I hate you.

Sincerely,
Mallet Muttering in Pennsylvania

---

Actually, I don't hate Roy. And I'm not that disappointed as to this first attempt.

If you haven't gotten the April 2012 issue of Popular Woodworkinghttp://www.popularwoodworking.com/apr12, you need to get it… now. They've got a great article by Roy Underhill on making the Mystery Mallet that you've been seeing around.

This actually is turning out to be a lot of fun. Before you point out the obvious, I know I shouldn't have used poplar. But I just got this nice, thick piece of poplar and thought it would be a good place to start.

Although the joint isn't totally tight, the concept is right on the money. I am very encouraged about this.

Here's what I've learned:

1. Take extra time to lay this out with a sharp pencil or marking knife.
2. It helps to have multiple marking gauges, dividers, sliding t-bevels, etc. that you can designate for one set up at a time.
3. Mark the head of your mallet and the handle with sides (A, B, C, D) and TOP, BOTTOM.
4. If you get stuck, bring the wood in the house, get a drink of water, go to bed (it will probably be around 1 a.m.) and sleep on it. :)
5. Use something other than poplar. (I have a thick piece of oak that I've set aside for something fun, like this.)

It will take a little time to get your head around these angles, slopes, joints, etc. These practice cuts have helped me get a better understanding of how this should work. Maybe tomorrow I'll cut into the oak.

Maybe.
Thanks for checking in, Mike.

When I first got into woodworking I didn't have a mallet, and I didn't really have the extra money to buy a "wooden hammer"-especially if this was just a passing interest. But I did have a box of hard maple flooring that someone was throwing out and gave me. A little work and planning and I glued up a simple mallet that has served me for several years.

I really like the shape of yours. That's really what I was looking to make originally. So now I might have to make 2 mallets! Thanks for the picture.
 

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Mallet - 1, Glen - 0

Dear "Saint" Roy,

Wood Symbol Hardwood Metal Plywood


Wood Rectangle Art Creative arts Beige


Rectangle Wood Flooring Beige Floor


I hate you.

Sincerely,
Mallet Muttering in Pennsylvania

---

Actually, I don't hate Roy. And I'm not that disappointed as to this first attempt.

If you haven't gotten the April 2012 issue of Popular Woodworkinghttp://www.popularwoodworking.com/apr12, you need to get it… now. They've got a great article by Roy Underhill on making the Mystery Mallet that you've been seeing around.

This actually is turning out to be a lot of fun. Before you point out the obvious, I know I shouldn't have used poplar. But I just got this nice, thick piece of poplar and thought it would be a good place to start.

Although the joint isn't totally tight, the concept is right on the money. I am very encouraged about this.

Here's what I've learned:

1. Take extra time to lay this out with a sharp pencil or marking knife.
2. It helps to have multiple marking gauges, dividers, sliding t-bevels, etc. that you can designate for one set up at a time.
3. Mark the head of your mallet and the handle with sides (A, B, C, D) and TOP, BOTTOM.
4. If you get stuck, bring the wood in the house, get a drink of water, go to bed (it will probably be around 1 a.m.) and sleep on it. :)
5. Use something other than poplar. (I have a thick piece of oak that I've set aside for something fun, like this.)

It will take a little time to get your head around these angles, slopes, joints, etc. These practice cuts have helped me get a better understanding of how this should work. Maybe tomorrow I'll cut into the oak.

Maybe.
Check this months Popular WW There is an article showing Roy making this mallet
 

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Mallet - 1, Glen - 0

Dear "Saint" Roy,

Wood Symbol Hardwood Metal Plywood


Wood Rectangle Art Creative arts Beige


Rectangle Wood Flooring Beige Floor


I hate you.

Sincerely,
Mallet Muttering in Pennsylvania

---

Actually, I don't hate Roy. And I'm not that disappointed as to this first attempt.

If you haven't gotten the April 2012 issue of Popular Woodworkinghttp://www.popularwoodworking.com/apr12, you need to get it… now. They've got a great article by Roy Underhill on making the Mystery Mallet that you've been seeing around.

This actually is turning out to be a lot of fun. Before you point out the obvious, I know I shouldn't have used poplar. But I just got this nice, thick piece of poplar and thought it would be a good place to start.

Although the joint isn't totally tight, the concept is right on the money. I am very encouraged about this.

Here's what I've learned:

1. Take extra time to lay this out with a sharp pencil or marking knife.
2. It helps to have multiple marking gauges, dividers, sliding t-bevels, etc. that you can designate for one set up at a time.
3. Mark the head of your mallet and the handle with sides (A, B, C, D) and TOP, BOTTOM.
4. If you get stuck, bring the wood in the house, get a drink of water, go to bed (it will probably be around 1 a.m.) and sleep on it. :)
5. Use something other than poplar. (I have a thick piece of oak that I've set aside for something fun, like this.)

It will take a little time to get your head around these angles, slopes, joints, etc. These practice cuts have helped me get a better understanding of how this should work. Maybe tomorrow I'll cut into the oak.

Maybe.
Sound like you have climbing up the learning curve Glen.

If you get stuck, bring the wood in the house, get a drink of water, go to bed (it will probably be around 1 a.m.) and sleep on it. HaHa…been there a few times.

Be sure to post the oak one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Mallet - 1, Glen - 0

Dear "Saint" Roy,

Wood Symbol Hardwood Metal Plywood


Wood Rectangle Art Creative arts Beige


Rectangle Wood Flooring Beige Floor


I hate you.

Sincerely,
Mallet Muttering in Pennsylvania

---

Actually, I don't hate Roy. And I'm not that disappointed as to this first attempt.

If you haven't gotten the April 2012 issue of Popular Woodworkinghttp://www.popularwoodworking.com/apr12, you need to get it… now. They've got a great article by Roy Underhill on making the Mystery Mallet that you've been seeing around.

This actually is turning out to be a lot of fun. Before you point out the obvious, I know I shouldn't have used poplar. But I just got this nice, thick piece of poplar and thought it would be a good place to start.

Although the joint isn't totally tight, the concept is right on the money. I am very encouraged about this.

Here's what I've learned:

1. Take extra time to lay this out with a sharp pencil or marking knife.
2. It helps to have multiple marking gauges, dividers, sliding t-bevels, etc. that you can designate for one set up at a time.
3. Mark the head of your mallet and the handle with sides (A, B, C, D) and TOP, BOTTOM.
4. If you get stuck, bring the wood in the house, get a drink of water, go to bed (it will probably be around 1 a.m.) and sleep on it. :)
5. Use something other than poplar. (I have a thick piece of oak that I've set aside for something fun, like this.)

It will take a little time to get your head around these angles, slopes, joints, etc. These practice cuts have helped me get a better understanding of how this should work. Maybe tomorrow I'll cut into the oak.

Maybe.
Hey, DocK, that's what got me a step farther toward the loony bin. :) I've seen it hinted at for the past month or so, but it wasn't until I got the magazine that the real planning got underway.

Thanks, Tim. And the oak is already on my bench waiting for the process to begin.

:)
 

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Mallet - 1, Glen - 0

Dear "Saint" Roy,

Wood Symbol Hardwood Metal Plywood


Wood Rectangle Art Creative arts Beige


Rectangle Wood Flooring Beige Floor


I hate you.

Sincerely,
Mallet Muttering in Pennsylvania

---

Actually, I don't hate Roy. And I'm not that disappointed as to this first attempt.

If you haven't gotten the April 2012 issue of Popular Woodworkinghttp://www.popularwoodworking.com/apr12, you need to get it… now. They've got a great article by Roy Underhill on making the Mystery Mallet that you've been seeing around.

This actually is turning out to be a lot of fun. Before you point out the obvious, I know I shouldn't have used poplar. But I just got this nice, thick piece of poplar and thought it would be a good place to start.

Although the joint isn't totally tight, the concept is right on the money. I am very encouraged about this.

Here's what I've learned:

1. Take extra time to lay this out with a sharp pencil or marking knife.
2. It helps to have multiple marking gauges, dividers, sliding t-bevels, etc. that you can designate for one set up at a time.
3. Mark the head of your mallet and the handle with sides (A, B, C, D) and TOP, BOTTOM.
4. If you get stuck, bring the wood in the house, get a drink of water, go to bed (it will probably be around 1 a.m.) and sleep on it. :)
5. Use something other than poplar. (I have a thick piece of oak that I've set aside for something fun, like this.)

It will take a little time to get your head around these angles, slopes, joints, etc. These practice cuts have helped me get a better understanding of how this should work. Maybe tomorrow I'll cut into the oak.

Maybe.
I drew one up in SketchUp a few months back and am dieing to try it out. I've not seen the article. I'll try to do it without it first. Thanks for posting, and let us see the Oak one when you finish it.
 

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Mallet - 1, Glen - 0

Dear "Saint" Roy,

Wood Symbol Hardwood Metal Plywood


Wood Rectangle Art Creative arts Beige


Rectangle Wood Flooring Beige Floor


I hate you.

Sincerely,
Mallet Muttering in Pennsylvania

---

Actually, I don't hate Roy. And I'm not that disappointed as to this first attempt.

If you haven't gotten the April 2012 issue of Popular Woodworkinghttp://www.popularwoodworking.com/apr12, you need to get it… now. They've got a great article by Roy Underhill on making the Mystery Mallet that you've been seeing around.

This actually is turning out to be a lot of fun. Before you point out the obvious, I know I shouldn't have used poplar. But I just got this nice, thick piece of poplar and thought it would be a good place to start.

Although the joint isn't totally tight, the concept is right on the money. I am very encouraged about this.

Here's what I've learned:

1. Take extra time to lay this out with a sharp pencil or marking knife.
2. It helps to have multiple marking gauges, dividers, sliding t-bevels, etc. that you can designate for one set up at a time.
3. Mark the head of your mallet and the handle with sides (A, B, C, D) and TOP, BOTTOM.
4. If you get stuck, bring the wood in the house, get a drink of water, go to bed (it will probably be around 1 a.m.) and sleep on it. :)
5. Use something other than poplar. (I have a thick piece of oak that I've set aside for something fun, like this.)

It will take a little time to get your head around these angles, slopes, joints, etc. These practice cuts have helped me get a better understanding of how this should work. Maybe tomorrow I'll cut into the oak.

Maybe.
Extremely neat project. Went straight to my fav list. Thanks for sharing this. I have a big chunk of hophornbeam just for this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Mallet - 1, Glen - 1

Dear Saint Roy,

I like you a lot more this week. Lots.

Sincerely,

Mallet Boy in PA

-------
If you haven't gotten a copy of the April 2012 issue of Popular Woodworking, do it today. That's where this insanity all got started. But I'm telling you, I never could have launched into this if it weren't for that article. They do a great job. Check them out.

The second attempt with the hardwood turned out to be much better. Doing a practice run with the poplar was a great idea and helped me figure out the angles and such.

As I wrote in the previous blog, I also used my marking knife for nearly every cut. When I couldn't see the mark it was making, I used a fine-tip pen. That helped out, too. Using two dedicated marking gauges was also helpful. Same with the sliding t-bevel.

I'm pretty happy with the results.



The joints were much better, too.



Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Varnish


Some things I learned:

1. Perfection doesn't come the first time, and that's okay. The second time is usually going to be better, so give your project a second attempt.
2. When I was cutting the sides of the mallet head, I used my chisel to cut a starter-groove for my saw. That helped create nice, crisp joints. A must for this project.
3. The hardwood (which I think is either oak or ash-it was a hand-me-down) was easier to work with than I expected.
4. I had my boys help me with the assembly. They were totally into it and excited with the results. More generational woodworking.
5. I test fit this and re-measured just about every way I knew possible. When I was ready to "bite the bullet," I glued it up real good, and started assembly. YOU WILL NOT BELIEVE how hard I had to hit this to get it to go together. Even still, the fit is pretty much right on.
6. The only change I would make is in the assembly. As you can see from the detail of the top of the mallet head, there is some discoloration on the right side. I didn't realize that my mallet head was bottomed out on the vise, and I sort of crushed the end grain on that side. Not a big deal, but I would be more careful about that if I were doing it again.

I'll add some finish and include a closing picture later.

Thanks for looking in.
 

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Mallet - 1, Glen - 1

Dear Saint Roy,

I like you a lot more this week. Lots.

Sincerely,

Mallet Boy in PA

-------
If you haven't gotten a copy of the April 2012 issue of Popular Woodworking, do it today. That's where this insanity all got started. But I'm telling you, I never could have launched into this if it weren't for that article. They do a great job. Check them out.

The second attempt with the hardwood turned out to be much better. Doing a practice run with the poplar was a great idea and helped me figure out the angles and such.

As I wrote in the previous blog, I also used my marking knife for nearly every cut. When I couldn't see the mark it was making, I used a fine-tip pen. That helped out, too. Using two dedicated marking gauges was also helpful. Same with the sliding t-bevel.

I'm pretty happy with the results.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Natural material


The joints were much better, too.

Brown Rectangle Wood Beige Hardwood

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Flooring

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Varnish


Some things I learned:

1. Perfection doesn't come the first time, and that's okay. The second time is usually going to be better, so give your project a second attempt.
2. When I was cutting the sides of the mallet head, I used my chisel to cut a starter-groove for my saw. That helped create nice, crisp joints. A must for this project.
3. The hardwood (which I think is either oak or ash-it was a hand-me-down) was easier to work with than I expected.
4. I had my boys help me with the assembly. They were totally into it and excited with the results. More generational woodworking.
5. I test fit this and re-measured just about every way I knew possible. When I was ready to "bite the bullet," I glued it up real good, and started assembly. YOU WILL NOT BELIEVE how hard I had to hit this to get it to go together. Even still, the fit is pretty much right on.
6. The only change I would make is in the assembly. As you can see from the detail of the top of the mallet head, there is some discoloration on the right side. I didn't realize that my mallet head was bottomed out on the vise, and I sort of crushed the end grain on that side. Not a big deal, but I would be more careful about that if I were doing it again.

I'll add some finish and include a closing picture later.

Thanks for looking in.
Looks good Glen. That should serve you well. Thanks for sharing .
 

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Mallet - 1, Glen - 1

Dear Saint Roy,

I like you a lot more this week. Lots.

Sincerely,

Mallet Boy in PA

-------
If you haven't gotten a copy of the April 2012 issue of Popular Woodworking, do it today. That's where this insanity all got started. But I'm telling you, I never could have launched into this if it weren't for that article. They do a great job. Check them out.

The second attempt with the hardwood turned out to be much better. Doing a practice run with the poplar was a great idea and helped me figure out the angles and such.

As I wrote in the previous blog, I also used my marking knife for nearly every cut. When I couldn't see the mark it was making, I used a fine-tip pen. That helped out, too. Using two dedicated marking gauges was also helpful. Same with the sliding t-bevel.

I'm pretty happy with the results.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Natural material


The joints were much better, too.

Brown Rectangle Wood Beige Hardwood

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Flooring

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Varnish


Some things I learned:

1. Perfection doesn't come the first time, and that's okay. The second time is usually going to be better, so give your project a second attempt.
2. When I was cutting the sides of the mallet head, I used my chisel to cut a starter-groove for my saw. That helped create nice, crisp joints. A must for this project.
3. The hardwood (which I think is either oak or ash-it was a hand-me-down) was easier to work with than I expected.
4. I had my boys help me with the assembly. They were totally into it and excited with the results. More generational woodworking.
5. I test fit this and re-measured just about every way I knew possible. When I was ready to "bite the bullet," I glued it up real good, and started assembly. YOU WILL NOT BELIEVE how hard I had to hit this to get it to go together. Even still, the fit is pretty much right on.
6. The only change I would make is in the assembly. As you can see from the detail of the top of the mallet head, there is some discoloration on the right side. I didn't realize that my mallet head was bottomed out on the vise, and I sort of crushed the end grain on that side. Not a big deal, but I would be more careful about that if I were doing it again.

I'll add some finish and include a closing picture later.

Thanks for looking in.
Mallet boy you should be proud of this! Very nice, the "practice poplar " one definitely helped you figure out the joints. looking forward to the pics with the finish on it, you will get many years of use out of it.
 

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Mallet - 1, Glen - 1

Dear Saint Roy,

I like you a lot more this week. Lots.

Sincerely,

Mallet Boy in PA

-------
If you haven't gotten a copy of the April 2012 issue of Popular Woodworking, do it today. That's where this insanity all got started. But I'm telling you, I never could have launched into this if it weren't for that article. They do a great job. Check them out.

The second attempt with the hardwood turned out to be much better. Doing a practice run with the poplar was a great idea and helped me figure out the angles and such.

As I wrote in the previous blog, I also used my marking knife for nearly every cut. When I couldn't see the mark it was making, I used a fine-tip pen. That helped out, too. Using two dedicated marking gauges was also helpful. Same with the sliding t-bevel.

I'm pretty happy with the results.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Natural material


The joints were much better, too.

Brown Rectangle Wood Beige Hardwood

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Flooring

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Varnish


Some things I learned:

1. Perfection doesn't come the first time, and that's okay. The second time is usually going to be better, so give your project a second attempt.
2. When I was cutting the sides of the mallet head, I used my chisel to cut a starter-groove for my saw. That helped create nice, crisp joints. A must for this project.
3. The hardwood (which I think is either oak or ash-it was a hand-me-down) was easier to work with than I expected.
4. I had my boys help me with the assembly. They were totally into it and excited with the results. More generational woodworking.
5. I test fit this and re-measured just about every way I knew possible. When I was ready to "bite the bullet," I glued it up real good, and started assembly. YOU WILL NOT BELIEVE how hard I had to hit this to get it to go together. Even still, the fit is pretty much right on.
6. The only change I would make is in the assembly. As you can see from the detail of the top of the mallet head, there is some discoloration on the right side. I didn't realize that my mallet head was bottomed out on the vise, and I sort of crushed the end grain on that side. Not a big deal, but I would be more careful about that if I were doing it again.

I'll add some finish and include a closing picture later.

Thanks for looking in.
Very nice and very impressive.
 

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Mallet - 1, Glen - 1

Dear Saint Roy,

I like you a lot more this week. Lots.

Sincerely,

Mallet Boy in PA

-------
If you haven't gotten a copy of the April 2012 issue of Popular Woodworking, do it today. That's where this insanity all got started. But I'm telling you, I never could have launched into this if it weren't for that article. They do a great job. Check them out.

The second attempt with the hardwood turned out to be much better. Doing a practice run with the poplar was a great idea and helped me figure out the angles and such.

As I wrote in the previous blog, I also used my marking knife for nearly every cut. When I couldn't see the mark it was making, I used a fine-tip pen. That helped out, too. Using two dedicated marking gauges was also helpful. Same with the sliding t-bevel.

I'm pretty happy with the results.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Natural material


The joints were much better, too.

Brown Rectangle Wood Beige Hardwood

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Flooring

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Varnish


Some things I learned:

1. Perfection doesn't come the first time, and that's okay. The second time is usually going to be better, so give your project a second attempt.
2. When I was cutting the sides of the mallet head, I used my chisel to cut a starter-groove for my saw. That helped create nice, crisp joints. A must for this project.
3. The hardwood (which I think is either oak or ash-it was a hand-me-down) was easier to work with than I expected.
4. I had my boys help me with the assembly. They were totally into it and excited with the results. More generational woodworking.
5. I test fit this and re-measured just about every way I knew possible. When I was ready to "bite the bullet," I glued it up real good, and started assembly. YOU WILL NOT BELIEVE how hard I had to hit this to get it to go together. Even still, the fit is pretty much right on.
6. The only change I would make is in the assembly. As you can see from the detail of the top of the mallet head, there is some discoloration on the right side. I didn't realize that my mallet head was bottomed out on the vise, and I sort of crushed the end grain on that side. Not a big deal, but I would be more careful about that if I were doing it again.

I'll add some finish and include a closing picture later.

Thanks for looking in.
Very good job. I did one too but I had an advantage. I did it in the shop with Roy so his guidance helped me to not have it break the first time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Mallet - 1, Glen - 1

Dear Saint Roy,

I like you a lot more this week. Lots.

Sincerely,

Mallet Boy in PA

-------
If you haven't gotten a copy of the April 2012 issue of Popular Woodworking, do it today. That's where this insanity all got started. But I'm telling you, I never could have launched into this if it weren't for that article. They do a great job. Check them out.

The second attempt with the hardwood turned out to be much better. Doing a practice run with the poplar was a great idea and helped me figure out the angles and such.

As I wrote in the previous blog, I also used my marking knife for nearly every cut. When I couldn't see the mark it was making, I used a fine-tip pen. That helped out, too. Using two dedicated marking gauges was also helpful. Same with the sliding t-bevel.

I'm pretty happy with the results.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Natural material


The joints were much better, too.

Brown Rectangle Wood Beige Hardwood

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Flooring

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Wood stain Varnish


Some things I learned:

1. Perfection doesn't come the first time, and that's okay. The second time is usually going to be better, so give your project a second attempt.
2. When I was cutting the sides of the mallet head, I used my chisel to cut a starter-groove for my saw. That helped create nice, crisp joints. A must for this project.
3. The hardwood (which I think is either oak or ash-it was a hand-me-down) was easier to work with than I expected.
4. I had my boys help me with the assembly. They were totally into it and excited with the results. More generational woodworking.
5. I test fit this and re-measured just about every way I knew possible. When I was ready to "bite the bullet," I glued it up real good, and started assembly. YOU WILL NOT BELIEVE how hard I had to hit this to get it to go together. Even still, the fit is pretty much right on.
6. The only change I would make is in the assembly. As you can see from the detail of the top of the mallet head, there is some discoloration on the right side. I didn't realize that my mallet head was bottomed out on the vise, and I sort of crushed the end grain on that side. Not a big deal, but I would be more careful about that if I were doing it again.

I'll add some finish and include a closing picture later.

Thanks for looking in.
Thanks for posting, everyone.

yrob - GOOD FOR YOU!! That's a nice one, too. And I went into the first one knowing it was a practice. So it was a good learning opportunity. The second one was with the good stuff. And because the head is hardwood, too, it should last a while.

As much as I enjoyed making it on my own, in my shop, with Roy's instructions nearby, I would have much rather joined your class in North Carolina. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Dressed and Ready for Work

As promised, here's the final outcome of Roy Underhill's Mystery Mallet.

Wood Art Rectangle Wood stain Varnish


Table Rectangle Wood Musical instrument Wood stain


Brown Rectangle Wood Wood stain Plank


Wood Wood stain Varnish Rectangle Hardwood


As you can see, I shaped the handle a little differently than they showed in the magazine. I like the squared-off handle better. I also stained the head one color and then applied several coats of tung oil to the whole thing.

Thanks, again, to venues like LJ, Roy Underhill, and the folks over at Popular Woodworking. My woodworking is better because of you all.
 

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Dressed and Ready for Work

As promised, here's the final outcome of Roy Underhill's Mystery Mallet.

Wood Art Rectangle Wood stain Varnish


Table Rectangle Wood Musical instrument Wood stain


Brown Rectangle Wood Wood stain Plank


Wood Wood stain Varnish Rectangle Hardwood


As you can see, I shaped the handle a little differently than they showed in the magazine. I like the squared-off handle better. I also stained the head one color and then applied several coats of tung oil to the whole thing.

Thanks, again, to venues like LJ, Roy Underhill, and the folks over at Popular Woodworking. My woodworking is better because of you all.
Turned out really nice Glen, thanks for posting. like the stain too.
 

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Dressed and Ready for Work

As promised, here's the final outcome of Roy Underhill's Mystery Mallet.

Wood Art Rectangle Wood stain Varnish


Table Rectangle Wood Musical instrument Wood stain


Brown Rectangle Wood Wood stain Plank


Wood Wood stain Varnish Rectangle Hardwood


As you can see, I shaped the handle a little differently than they showed in the magazine. I like the squared-off handle better. I also stained the head one color and then applied several coats of tung oil to the whole thing.

Thanks, again, to venues like LJ, Roy Underhill, and the folks over at Popular Woodworking. My woodworking is better because of you all.
Turned out great. I like looking at the different designs, I want to make my own mallet soon.
 

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Dressed and Ready for Work

As promised, here's the final outcome of Roy Underhill's Mystery Mallet.

Wood Art Rectangle Wood stain Varnish


Table Rectangle Wood Musical instrument Wood stain


Brown Rectangle Wood Wood stain Plank


Wood Wood stain Varnish Rectangle Hardwood


As you can see, I shaped the handle a little differently than they showed in the magazine. I like the squared-off handle better. I also stained the head one color and then applied several coats of tung oil to the whole thing.

Thanks, again, to venues like LJ, Roy Underhill, and the folks over at Popular Woodworking. My woodworking is better because of you all.
i watched that episode after you post and really like the mallet. Great job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Dressed and Ready for Work

As promised, here's the final outcome of Roy Underhill's Mystery Mallet.

Wood Art Rectangle Wood stain Varnish


Table Rectangle Wood Musical instrument Wood stain


Brown Rectangle Wood Wood stain Plank


Wood Wood stain Varnish Rectangle Hardwood


As you can see, I shaped the handle a little differently than they showed in the magazine. I like the squared-off handle better. I also stained the head one color and then applied several coats of tung oil to the whole thing.

Thanks, again, to venues like LJ, Roy Underhill, and the folks over at Popular Woodworking. My woodworking is better because of you all.
O sure appreciate your kind words. Thanks for stopping by.

Oh, I was going to post this thought and didn't. I really like the contrast between the head and handle, but it would have been easier if I had stained the head by itself and let it set overnight before assembling. But I was just too excited! I had to fit this together!!

At it turned out, I masked it off the head, put a couple of coats of finish on the handle, then stained the head. That helped, but it still would have been better to do it the other way.
 

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Dressed and Ready for Work

As promised, here's the final outcome of Roy Underhill's Mystery Mallet.

Wood Art Rectangle Wood stain Varnish


Table Rectangle Wood Musical instrument Wood stain


Brown Rectangle Wood Wood stain Plank


Wood Wood stain Varnish Rectangle Hardwood


As you can see, I shaped the handle a little differently than they showed in the magazine. I like the squared-off handle better. I also stained the head one color and then applied several coats of tung oil to the whole thing.

Thanks, again, to venues like LJ, Roy Underhill, and the folks over at Popular Woodworking. My woodworking is better because of you all.
That looks great! I really like how your handle is flush with the head of the mallet on top. I hope to make one of my own someday.

- Sean
 

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