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cabinet frame started

Started last night, I remembered that I forgot (go figure) the glue in the garage last time I used it (in the summer) so I went to bring it into the house so that it can defrost overnight as I planned on using it today.

I got out of the house today and it felt so nice… kinda warm… 32 degrees (F, 0 degree C) didn't even need gloves. amazing what a couple of weeks in 12F can do to you.

I was planning to have most of the long weekend dedicated for this project, but as things seem, this may not be the case anymore. I was contemplating whether to even start this, as I don't want to have to leave it half made, but ended up starting it after all.

I made another view in Sketchup of the carcass parts, printed it out, and took it with me so that I can have a reference to work against, and a paper to note things on:



As it happen, I already altered the height of the parts by 3/8" making it slightly lower than originally planned.

my plywood source is leftovers from past projects, so I'm half improvising. the project I got the plywood from is an old project that was done with a circular saw- it's quite amazing to see now how unstraight my cut lines used to be… made it quite hard to rip and cut the pieces on the TS this time around. but close enough is good enough for this project. I also don't have a large enough piece for the back, and will have to make the back from 2 pieces one on top of the other:



all in all, it's about half of what I expected to accomplish today, but it's better than nothing.

I did get to use the triton router freehand, and although it has some things that could use refinement, it does perform very well, and since it'll be perm. in the table, I think I'll be ok.

you can also see the phenolic top in it's planned position (albeit lower than it supposed to be)

Peace.
Which router did you end up choosing and have you purchased it yet?
 

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Discussion Starter · #102 ·
cabinet frame started

Started last night, I remembered that I forgot (go figure) the glue in the garage last time I used it (in the summer) so I went to bring it into the house so that it can defrost overnight as I planned on using it today.

I got out of the house today and it felt so nice… kinda warm… 32 degrees (F, 0 degree C) didn't even need gloves. amazing what a couple of weeks in 12F can do to you.

I was planning to have most of the long weekend dedicated for this project, but as things seem, this may not be the case anymore. I was contemplating whether to even start this, as I don't want to have to leave it half made, but ended up starting it after all.

I made another view in Sketchup of the carcass parts, printed it out, and took it with me so that I can have a reference to work against, and a paper to note things on:



As it happen, I already altered the height of the parts by 3/8" making it slightly lower than originally planned.

my plywood source is leftovers from past projects, so I'm half improvising. the project I got the plywood from is an old project that was done with a circular saw- it's quite amazing to see now how unstraight my cut lines used to be… made it quite hard to rip and cut the pieces on the TS this time around. but close enough is good enough for this project. I also don't have a large enough piece for the back, and will have to make the back from 2 pieces one on top of the other:



all in all, it's about half of what I expected to accomplish today, but it's better than nothing.

I did get to use the triton router freehand, and although it has some things that could use refinement, it does perform very well, and since it'll be perm. in the table, I think I'll be ok.

you can also see the phenolic top in it's planned position (albeit lower than it supposed to be)

Peace.
Jerry, I went with the Triton - posted it here for what I was looking for, it gave me more while paying less. so far I'm happy with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #103 ·
Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
 

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Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
Sharon, this is looking pretty good. Bummer about the scratches but they really are only cosmetic.

The same thing would have happened in a cast iron top. I have put a few scratches in my cast iron top from my miter sled. I used carriage bolts to mount the hold downs and apparently there is enough friction from the head of the carriage bolt to scratch the cast iron unless they are tightened down. So I hesitate to think what the end of a screw would do.
 

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Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
Very nicely done! Great face-frame construction.
The colour of the face frame (hardwood) and the plywood ilook almost the same. Are both of the same wood species?
 

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Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
Good progress it's going to be very good when your done
 

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Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
That's definitely starting to look like a solid, clean cabinet. I can confirm with Scott that screws scratch cast iron. I've actually done it with exactly the same, painful, annoying problem you've had, except mine was my fault. I hadn't set the stop since the last time I used it on thinner stock, so I was drilling way too deep, and my table saw was my assembly table. Sigh… At least it kind of buffed out after a few of my occasional Scotch Brite scrubbing to remove rust and restore the slippery sheen.

Anyway, glad to see the continued progress. Onward!
 

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Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
This will look great in your living room… lol'

Really a very nice piece of furniture… shop furniture that is..
 

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Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
Making great progress, I see.
It really does look like furniture!
Shop furniture!!!
Ellen
 

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Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
GOING TO LOOK TOO NICE TO BE IN THE SHOP…..................LOL
 

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Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
That a great looking cabinet. Your router will look mighty proud burried with the depths. And router bits close by and wrenches close by

What a cool idea.
 

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Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
Hi Sharon;

It's looking good.

Too bad about the saw table. Cast iron would get scratched too.

I know I'm in the minority here, but I still won't use pocket screws. I just can't get used to that hole! Even plugged, they still bother me.

Could be I need some sort of professional help.

Lee
 

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Discussion Starter · #113 ·
Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
Thanks everyone for the kind words… as for pocket screws - they are quick and straight forward, but I would not use them for fine furniture. maybe for shop cabinets, and build ins.
 

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Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
I know the feeling of screw tips scarring my cast iron top all too well…...If I had a Granite top , I think I would be truly upset though. Mine are just deep enough to catch your fingernail and be an eyesore , but also serve as a constant reminder not to do it again : ) I might try your epoxy tip to fill the voids…thank you

Your cabinet frame is looking great so far , Sharon ! Happy Holidays to you and your family : )
Len
 

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Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
Yah, that perfectly flat surface is just too tempting to use as an assembly/work table!

My work gets many shipments in cheap boxes made from cheap 1/4" ply. I salvaged quite a bit of it and make covers for the saw table. I just throw them away when they get too much glue, scratches, whatever. If I am not using the table saw, the top is covered (usually - one time when I didn't, a visiting friend set a beer on the table and I now have a rust ring to polish out).
 

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Discussion Starter · #116 ·
Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
EEngineer - I have plenty of masonite boards (1/8") which I constantly use to cover the table saw when I'm doing glueups… since I was done with the glue up - I took it off… but as said - a lesson to be learnt. the scratches are just an eyesore, I can't even catch my fingernail in it though, I may just leave them as a reminder. at least I dont have to worry about beer though ;)
 

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Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
Your project progress looks fantastic. The timber, in photo at least, appears strong and your expertise evident.
 

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Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
A solid looking cabinet indeed. Nicely done!
 

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Half Throttle - Cabinet is Framed!

I picked up today where I left yesterday. today however, I had a bit more time to work on this. I printed the face frame design/layout from Sketchup, and out to the freezer we go:



I added the 2nd piece that makes up the back (had to use 2 pieces of plywood as I don't have 1 large enough part for the back), and then I noticed that my plywood carcass is a bit out of wack- the back aligns with the left side, but the right side is a bit lower, ah crap, I guess I'll have to shimmy shim the thing after all. I know where I messed up - I started putting the parts together in the wrong order, starting with the bottom and back, then had to align the left and right to 2 parts each. I should have started with the left-back-right, and align the bottom to all 3 parts which would then be align a the top… oh well, too late for me now.

Another unfortunate thing happened today. I am using pocket holes (and glue) for the construction of the carcass and face frame. somewhere towards the end of the carcass build my drill-bit-stop was pushed up (I guess it lost it's grip) and the last part in the carcass was drilled too deep!!!!! which means, that the pocket screws once driven all the way in, end up being driven through the 2nd part, and are left with their tip exposed. I only discovered it later on after I placed the cabinet on my table saw, and felt it 'grip' the top of my TS - made some nasty scratches in the granite :( it's only visual, and minor, and easily fixed with epoxy, but I would have had it better if it didn't happen at all. just something to keep an eye on when doing pocket holes… uuuuggggghhhhh. I wonder what would have happened with Cast Iron - would it scratch as well?

so, aside from the scratches on the granite, and the low right side which will need to be trimmed and shimmed to match the rest of the cabinet to make it steady, and have a good support for the top, It ended up pretty nice. this sucker is getting heavy, and from now on (after I put the casters on) will stay on the ground:



In terms of progress, I'm at the end of day 2 and have accomplished what I was planning to accomplish at the end of day 1. could say that I'm 1 day behind… or more mathematically correct - that I'm working in half-throttle, and at 1/2 the production rate. as it seems, I'll at least have the cabinet made by the end of the weekend, so it can stand on it's own and not take benchtop space. drawers, and the rest, can be taken on one at a time later on.

Peace.
Way to go PurpLev, this is actually a whole lot more spacious than what your drawings initially suggests.
 

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Discussion Starter · #120 ·
Cast(ers) Away

Not much done today, had time to install the casters. had to go the lowes for some lag bolts (5/16) as the casters did not come with it.

I found the casters on eBay for a fantastic price. it's sold by SES Casters which are here in Massachusetts. total price was ~26 including shipping. they may not be red and shiny - but they are soft, heavy duty, and work fantastic! I highly recommend this seller by any means.

I installed 2 swivel casters on the front of the table, and 2 non swivel casters in the back. when the front casters are locked, there are no wheels that can slide/move in the direction of the feed:



I installed 2 lag bolts into the end of the plywood sides, and 2 bolts with nuts that go through the bottom piece. I'm not too sure about the bolts in the ply-edge as the edge usually doesn't have much holding power (but I have been pleasantly surprised in the past from screws into ply-edge), but being a physics major - having the plywood sides (which hold the rails and drawers, and all their weight) rest on the casters will create less stress on the bottom piece, and the pocket screws that hold it to the sides. besides, there's not much pressure on these lag bolts. worst case, I can always remount the casters.

so here it is, in it's planned location that will/might double work as an outfeed table (just have to figure out how to handle the DC hose in the back of the saw):



the top lays on the cabinet and is very very stable (surprisingly). there is a gap between the top and the right side as it was installed too low, but I can shim that, or fill it with something. I think I'll mount the top to the cabinet with triangle blocks in each corner (and 2 in the center) to secure it from moving about.

not much done today for lack of time, and the need to drive around for bolts. but at least it took the cabinet off the tablesaw/workbench, which are now back to being functional.

Next I would like to work on the top, and mount the router in it somehow.

Peace.
 
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