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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Concept, design, and taredown

Well, this is my way of getting my ideas out and get some solid advise.

About 3 weeks ago my daughter, who is 2, tore the false fronts of her $60 Walmart dresser. This is just what I needed. I started thinking about building her a good dresser. However, to this point I have only built one project (my drafting table that I will post soon).

As I started looking at designs for dressers, I discovered all called for dove tail joints. This revelation scared the crap out of me. So, I called my uncle, who is a expert furniture maker, and asked his advice. He explained to me that a box joint would be a good a way to get started in furniture making. As well as a good way to work up to doing dove tails. He also told me I could buy a dove tail jig, but after looking at the cost (anywhere from $120.00 to $600.00) I decided to start with box joints.

I joined this site and found some great examples of box joint cutting jigs. Most were for the table saw, however, I own a Ryobi folding contractors saw that doesn't have a regular miter gauge slot. I did find one that was made and set for a routing table. (Thank You, Wingstress!) But, that meant I need to build a routing table…Isn't it funny how one project brings about 3 others? Well, I guess in the beginning.

I decided the old dresser shouldn't go to waste. I (by coincidence) found this might actually make a great routing table and cabinet.

Three nights ago I started taking measurements and sketching out the details. This is one of my favorite things to do, and I usually spend a lot of time on it. However, I figured this was a need now system.

Two nights ago, I got the basics worked out and starting the prep phase. I decided that I would chop about 6 to 8 inches of the bottom of the carcass, and reinforce the outside with a exoskeleton of red oak. The carcass has a white oak laminate and I figured the mix of red and white oak colors would make a nice looking project. Even though it is fake.

Yesterday, I started the taredown of the dresser. I found that the base of the carcass was not what I thought it was and had to be cut off completely. This left me with only the top and 2 sides of the carcass.

I also found that without the original base I was going to need to reinforce the inside of the carcass itself as well. So, I pulled out some construction pine 2×4's and ripped them down in both directions to give me 3/4" x 3" peices for the inside. I set them aside to see if they would warp or twist.

I had already made the router table top last weekend, now I need to laminate it, add the groove for the router plate, and miter slots.

I will post my pics and progress later today. Thanks for reading.
 

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2,385 Posts
Concept, design, and taredown

Well, this is my way of getting my ideas out and get some solid advise.

About 3 weeks ago my daughter, who is 2, tore the false fronts of her $60 Walmart dresser. This is just what I needed. I started thinking about building her a good dresser. However, to this point I have only built one project (my drafting table that I will post soon).

As I started looking at designs for dressers, I discovered all called for dove tail joints. This revelation scared the crap out of me. So, I called my uncle, who is a expert furniture maker, and asked his advice. He explained to me that a box joint would be a good a way to get started in furniture making. As well as a good way to work up to doing dove tails. He also told me I could buy a dove tail jig, but after looking at the cost (anywhere from $120.00 to $600.00) I decided to start with box joints.

I joined this site and found some great examples of box joint cutting jigs. Most were for the table saw, however, I own a Ryobi folding contractors saw that doesn't have a regular miter gauge slot. I did find one that was made and set for a routing table. (Thank You, Wingstress!) But, that meant I need to build a routing table…Isn't it funny how one project brings about 3 others? Well, I guess in the beginning.

I decided the old dresser shouldn't go to waste. I (by coincidence) found this might actually make a great routing table and cabinet.

Three nights ago I started taking measurements and sketching out the details. This is one of my favorite things to do, and I usually spend a lot of time on it. However, I figured this was a need now system.

Two nights ago, I got the basics worked out and starting the prep phase. I decided that I would chop about 6 to 8 inches of the bottom of the carcass, and reinforce the outside with a exoskeleton of red oak. The carcass has a white oak laminate and I figured the mix of red and white oak colors would make a nice looking project. Even though it is fake.

Yesterday, I started the taredown of the dresser. I found that the base of the carcass was not what I thought it was and had to be cut off completely. This left me with only the top and 2 sides of the carcass.

I also found that without the original base I was going to need to reinforce the inside of the carcass itself as well. So, I pulled out some construction pine 2×4's and ripped them down in both directions to give me 3/4" x 3" peices for the inside. I set them aside to see if they would warp or twist.

I had already made the router table top last weekend, now I need to laminate it, add the groove for the router plate, and miter slots.

I will post my pics and progress later today. Thanks for reading.
Good start, please keep us posted?
 

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Registered
Joined
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27,252 Posts
Concept, design, and taredown

Well, this is my way of getting my ideas out and get some solid advise.

About 3 weeks ago my daughter, who is 2, tore the false fronts of her $60 Walmart dresser. This is just what I needed. I started thinking about building her a good dresser. However, to this point I have only built one project (my drafting table that I will post soon).

As I started looking at designs for dressers, I discovered all called for dove tail joints. This revelation scared the crap out of me. So, I called my uncle, who is a expert furniture maker, and asked his advice. He explained to me that a box joint would be a good a way to get started in furniture making. As well as a good way to work up to doing dove tails. He also told me I could buy a dove tail jig, but after looking at the cost (anywhere from $120.00 to $600.00) I decided to start with box joints.

I joined this site and found some great examples of box joint cutting jigs. Most were for the table saw, however, I own a Ryobi folding contractors saw that doesn't have a regular miter gauge slot. I did find one that was made and set for a routing table. (Thank You, Wingstress!) But, that meant I need to build a routing table…Isn't it funny how one project brings about 3 others? Well, I guess in the beginning.

I decided the old dresser shouldn't go to waste. I (by coincidence) found this might actually make a great routing table and cabinet.

Three nights ago I started taking measurements and sketching out the details. This is one of my favorite things to do, and I usually spend a lot of time on it. However, I figured this was a need now system.

Two nights ago, I got the basics worked out and starting the prep phase. I decided that I would chop about 6 to 8 inches of the bottom of the carcass, and reinforce the outside with a exoskeleton of red oak. The carcass has a white oak laminate and I figured the mix of red and white oak colors would make a nice looking project. Even though it is fake.

Yesterday, I started the taredown of the dresser. I found that the base of the carcass was not what I thought it was and had to be cut off completely. This left me with only the top and 2 sides of the carcass.

I also found that without the original base I was going to need to reinforce the inside of the carcass itself as well. So, I pulled out some construction pine 2×4's and ripped them down in both directions to give me 3/4" x 3" peices for the inside. I set them aside to see if they would warp or twist.

I had already made the router table top last weekend, now I need to laminate it, add the groove for the router plate, and miter slots.

I will post my pics and progress later today. Thanks for reading.
Another joint that you might want to consider is a locking rabbet joint. This is a joint that is almost as strong as a dovetail joint and can be constructed solely on the tablesaw.
 

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253 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Concept, design, and taredown

Well, this is my way of getting my ideas out and get some solid advise.

About 3 weeks ago my daughter, who is 2, tore the false fronts of her $60 Walmart dresser. This is just what I needed. I started thinking about building her a good dresser. However, to this point I have only built one project (my drafting table that I will post soon).

As I started looking at designs for dressers, I discovered all called for dove tail joints. This revelation scared the crap out of me. So, I called my uncle, who is a expert furniture maker, and asked his advice. He explained to me that a box joint would be a good a way to get started in furniture making. As well as a good way to work up to doing dove tails. He also told me I could buy a dove tail jig, but after looking at the cost (anywhere from $120.00 to $600.00) I decided to start with box joints.

I joined this site and found some great examples of box joint cutting jigs. Most were for the table saw, however, I own a Ryobi folding contractors saw that doesn't have a regular miter gauge slot. I did find one that was made and set for a routing table. (Thank You, Wingstress!) But, that meant I need to build a routing table…Isn't it funny how one project brings about 3 others? Well, I guess in the beginning.

I decided the old dresser shouldn't go to waste. I (by coincidence) found this might actually make a great routing table and cabinet.

Three nights ago I started taking measurements and sketching out the details. This is one of my favorite things to do, and I usually spend a lot of time on it. However, I figured this was a need now system.

Two nights ago, I got the basics worked out and starting the prep phase. I decided that I would chop about 6 to 8 inches of the bottom of the carcass, and reinforce the outside with a exoskeleton of red oak. The carcass has a white oak laminate and I figured the mix of red and white oak colors would make a nice looking project. Even though it is fake.

Yesterday, I started the taredown of the dresser. I found that the base of the carcass was not what I thought it was and had to be cut off completely. This left me with only the top and 2 sides of the carcass.

I also found that without the original base I was going to need to reinforce the inside of the carcass itself as well. So, I pulled out some construction pine 2×4's and ripped them down in both directions to give me 3/4" x 3" peices for the inside. I set them aside to see if they would warp or twist.

I had already made the router table top last weekend, now I need to laminate it, add the groove for the router plate, and miter slots.

I will post my pics and progress later today. Thanks for reading.
Scott,

Thank you for the Info. Do you do a locking rabbet joint with a regular blade or dado blade?
 

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253 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Disaster!

Hello all,

Sorry I had not posted the follow up sooner, but family life superceeds all.

Well, I learned a lot of this project. The main ones are:
1) Never reuse partical board!
2) Beginners should always spend max amount of time on planning.
3) For now, always build a scale prototype.
4) Never laminate during the assembly phase…save it for last. More cutting, but less gouging.
5) Pilot holes, pilot holes, and pilot holes. Regardless of the screw size.

I did manage to get the back and base built and installed. However, with the extra weight of the plywood back and 2×4/plywood base; just pulled the hardware joinery right out of the reused partical board.

Oh well. Its progress not perfection, right?

I also discovered I needed a lot more practice before I went crazy with anything else…

This stuff ain't as easy as it looks. LOL

This all happened about 5 weeks ago, and since than I have managed to redeem some sense of pride with a few other projects I have started and finished.

Since this little debacle, I have completed a sandbox (pics to follow), an assembly bench, and a work bench. I am going to write a blog about the work benchs latter today.

As I read over my two blogs, I also hope my writing improves as much as my woodworking.
 

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Registered
Joined
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118,619 Posts
Disaster!

Hello all,

Sorry I had not posted the follow up sooner, but family life superceeds all.

Well, I learned a lot of this project. The main ones are:
1) Never reuse partical board!
2) Beginners should always spend max amount of time on planning.
3) For now, always build a scale prototype.
4) Never laminate during the assembly phase…save it for last. More cutting, but less gouging.
5) Pilot holes, pilot holes, and pilot holes. Regardless of the screw size.

I did manage to get the back and base built and installed. However, with the extra weight of the plywood back and 2×4/plywood base; just pulled the hardware joinery right out of the reused partical board.

Oh well. Its progress not perfection, right?

I also discovered I needed a lot more practice before I went crazy with anything else…

This stuff ain't as easy as it looks. LOL

This all happened about 5 weeks ago, and since than I have managed to redeem some sense of pride with a few other projects I have started and finished.

Since this little debacle, I have completed a sandbox (pics to follow), an assembly bench, and a work bench. I am going to write a blog about the work benchs latter today.

As I read over my two blogs, I also hope my writing improves as much as my woodworking.
Does the new sand box look like a upside down router table? LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
Disaster!

Hello all,

Sorry I had not posted the follow up sooner, but family life superceeds all.

Well, I learned a lot of this project. The main ones are:
1) Never reuse partical board!
2) Beginners should always spend max amount of time on planning.
3) For now, always build a scale prototype.
4) Never laminate during the assembly phase…save it for last. More cutting, but less gouging.
5) Pilot holes, pilot holes, and pilot holes. Regardless of the screw size.

I did manage to get the back and base built and installed. However, with the extra weight of the plywood back and 2×4/plywood base; just pulled the hardware joinery right out of the reused partical board.

Oh well. Its progress not perfection, right?

I also discovered I needed a lot more practice before I went crazy with anything else…

This stuff ain't as easy as it looks. LOL

This all happened about 5 weeks ago, and since than I have managed to redeem some sense of pride with a few other projects I have started and finished.

Since this little debacle, I have completed a sandbox (pics to follow), an assembly bench, and a work bench. I am going to write a blog about the work benchs latter today.

As I read over my two blogs, I also hope my writing improves as much as my woodworking.
Perseverance Randy! We all have been there and still are from time to time!
 
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