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I am planning my first quality hardwood project. I want to make it with traditional joinery such as mortise and tenons.

I had planned on using a router to make the Mortises, and round off the tenons. After reading a lot on this seems more people, if they have the resources, lean more towards a Square Mortises machines.

To get a Mortise machine that goes up to 3/4 square holes is over $300.

Also a question. If you have a Mortise machine that goes up to a max of 1/2 wide mortise, can one make it 3/4 by say using 2 holes using a 3/8s drills.

I find that hard to believe since I would think that the bit would wonder into the first hole…
 

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It just depends on the level of perfection you need.

If you want clean, square holes, make the investment in a proper mortiser. One with an X Y vise\table is worth the extra effort\investment IMO.

But, I do custom cabinetry where clients demand that no nails or screws are used with solid hardwoods.

 

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Yes, you should have no problem doing a double row of cuts with a mortiser. The chisels are very stiff and rigid and shouldn't flex unduly. I often cut a mortise where the last cut uses only half the chisel width, and I have never noticed any flexing.

I know there are people who disagree with this. I can only report on my own experience.

If you are considering a drill press mortiser, you may be disappointed. Most people despise those, and come away convinced that machine cut mortises aren't worth the bother.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It just depends on the level of perfection you need.

If you want clean, square holes, make the investment in a proper mortiser. One with an X Y vise able is worth the extra effortinvestment IMO.

But, I do custom cabinetry where clients demand that no nails or screws are used with solid hardwoods.



- timbertailor
Great set up there
 
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