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Has anybody used the wood of the Rose of Sharon bush? I know it's not properly a tree but the trunk can get pretty big and the wood is the whitest I've ever seen. I cut a ten year old specimen down and wondered if this wood might be used for making stringing or something.

DB
 

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I would dry it out and see if it dries out well, we all use holly for inlay and that's not really a tree.
 

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That pic takes Bonsai to a new level yeah!

I've done some inlay and as of yet have been using maple, it has drawbacks but for gradual curves it works, the only issue I have is it looks a little orange under Tung oil. If Holly isn't a tree you could fool me with the 20 something foot high hollies we have in our area.
 

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Ken,
Is that rose of sharon?

db

- Don "Dances with Wood" Butler
It looks like it, the link in post one gave me the impression that the man in the picture trained a that rose or sharon bush to look the way it does:


I thought it was cool. Probably because I can't find the time to give my plants water, much less mold them into interesting shapes. I'm a bad plant owner! And just as I was feeling that PERHAPS I could coax my Rose of Sharon into something less like a bush.
 

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Rose of Sharon is a member of the Hibiscus family (Hibiscus syriacus), which are typically shrubs and short trees. Also known as the Chinese Hibiscus or China Rose Hibiscus IIRC. I'm not sure how similar it is to the more common Hibiscus plants used for landscaping down here in Florida, but here is a link to it's (Hibiscus lasiococcus) woodworking properties over at the Wood Workers Source site:
http://www.woodworkerssource.com/show_properties.php?wood=Hibiscus%20lasiococcus

Looks like it would be a nice wood to work with.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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I agree with tinnman65, let it dry and give it a try. That is how I started using shrub honeysuckle wood (which has a beautiful natural golden color) and wood from my Rugosa Rose bush. Boxwood is not a tree but it is widely used for inlay and accents. Keep us posted, (I have a lot of small Rose of Sharon seedlings popping up from the hedge my neighbors planted - you may have just given me a reason to let them grow.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Leafherder,
Rosa rogusa is a maneater!
Big nasty thorns everywhere.
Grows like a weed.
By the way, the rose hips that form behind the blossoms are tart and swet and a great source for vitamin C!

Don
 

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Yes Rosa Rugosa is prickly (to put it mildly), but also the most disease and pest resistant rose that I have ever seen in the Midwest - AND the scent is heavenly when it blooms. Wish it was easier to propagate, would love a hedge to keep the neighbors cats away from my bird feeders. Plus the wood is sturdy enough to make canes and walking sticks. :)
 
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