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Hello everyone!

So I've decided to get the ridgid r4511 but the largest circuit in my garage is 15a/120v. Should I have a 20am circuit installed?

I remember a friend doing our floors was cutting laminate on his ridgid r4510, but I'm sure it wasn't drawing 15amps continuously. I was thinking maybe if I was cutting some maple or oak, the saw might draw 13amp from the circuit and the rule is that circuits shouldn't be loaded more than 80% of their maximum rating, so should I be worried?
 

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First, I'm not an electrician. There are a lot of variables at play here, motor rating and distance of the wiring run from the source to the consumption - basically you lose power of long runs.

It is not as simple as installing a new breaker you also have to look at the garages wiring. Most homes are wired using 14/2 wire which is rated for a max a 15amps. If you put a 20 amp breaker on 15 amp wire it could catch fire before it throws the breaker. For a new 20 amp circuit you would probably need new wiring using 12/2 or 12/3 if it is 220v.

I chose to install a 100amp sub panel for my garage / shop and give my TS a dedicated 30a/220v circuit. My tablesaw has 5hp motor and the manual called for 30a circuit.
 

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Will it burst into flames? No. While the 13 amps listed is the FLA rating I would look into upgrading that circuit….Depending on the wire gauge already used it may be as simple as replacing the breaker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Our panel is actually only a few feet away from that garage circuit under ground level. I would change it but I'd have to remove a lot of drywall and there's a built in shelf on the side where the wire goes up to the garage so I'd have to take that down also.
 

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Also is there anything else on that particular circuit? I have this saw and before I rewired my garage it operated off of a 15 amp circuit that also powered pretty much everything else (think 1950's backyard electrical) I would routinely blow that breaker even on soft maple….not to mention that the over all performance of the saw was lacking until I rewired.
 

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I have a Bosch contractor saw on a 15 amp circuit. I generally don't have a problem even with the shopvac on the same circuit. The only time I have trouble is when a lot of blade is buried in the workpiece, like resawing oak that's too wide for the blade and has to be flipped for a second pass. In that case the breaker will trip. I can solve the problem by plugging the shopvac into another circuit for that operation. It's been a really long time since that happened. In fact, I'm pretty sure I also had a box fan going at the same time. I moved that to a different circuit and I simply don't have a problem anymore.

Most of the time, the TS is drawing much less than the maximum power.

Do not replace the breaker unless the wiring is sized for it. If it was sized for it, it would probably already have a 20 amp breaker.
 

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I have the 4511 saw on a 15 amp circuit in my garage which is also the same rating circuit in the rest of my one bedroom apartment. The breaker for two of my walls (which power my flatscreen tv, pc and microwave) trips several times a week (Contractor who built this place used cheap breakers and recepticles). Circuit is only 3 years old. I've yet to trip the garage's 15 amp circuit using my table saw. I've cut 3/4 birch ply, 3/4 poplar, plastic and about 100' of 2X4's. I think if you just watch your feed rate of the hard woods, you'll be fine. If you are a hobbist, why go through the trouble of rippin out drywall, and reduing the electrical? Unless you're going to be running several pieces of equipment at once.
 

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I also run my R4511 on a 15 amp circuit in the garage. The garage fluoroscent lights and few other household lights are also on the same circuit and so far the breaker hasn't tripped. I haven't ripped 12/4 rock maple on it, but i have ripped 3/4" hardwood, plywood, etc with a non-thin kerf blade. I did notice couple of times that the garage lights dimmed momentarily when the saw started, but it was for less than a second.

Replacing the wiring to go from 15 amps to 20 amps is not feasible in my townhome.
 

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you pickin' up the saw used? those are hard to find.

I have the same saw and no troubles on a 15 amp breaker. Only time I have trouble is when running the dust collector and the air filtration unit and the saw. But I just run a 10g cord into the laundry room and go off the 20 amp breaker for the washing machine if I'm running a bunch of stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Nah, you can still buy these in Canada, they're 599 here though.

I was just worried because 13amps was over the 80% load rule, but I guess I was just being paranoid. I doubt the wires would get hot enough to set anything on fire anyways.
 

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I've been following this thread and one question I ask myself is how long do I really run my saw without turning it off for a bit. My answer is 10 maybe 15 minutes max. At that point I have got to start moving stuff out of the way if I need to continue.

Like said earlier I'm not an electrician but if your breaker is good what is the worst thing that can happen - trip the breaker and as long as your lights aren't on the same circuit it not that big of a deal.

Now you might have a bigger problem if your wife's TV and DVR are on the same circuit and then there is hell to pay. Been there done that! My air compressor was on the same 15amp circuit as the living room and the utility room. I didn't have a problem until the air compressor and the freezer compressor kicked on at the same time she was watching the TV. - this scenario was the capitalistic for the 100 amp sub-panel.

I mentioned my sub-panel earlier maybe I should give a little more details on what I did because it wasn't that difficult. (And by no means is this up to code, I didn't want to deal with electrical permitting and I wanted it easily removable when I get ready to sell the house.)

Anyway, Lowe's carries a Workshop Load Center it comes with 100amp main, a couple of 40 amp double pole breakers and probably 4 - 20 amp single pole breakers - I don't remember the price but it was less than $100. It can be surface mounted or recessed mounted. I mounted my to the end of my work table and ran 4 - 110amp wires (2 hots, 1 neutral, 1 ground) to the main panel about foot above the top other new box.

I had an open space in the main panel so I installed 100 amp breaker and wired it to the new sub panel's 100 amp main. I can flip either of the 100 amp breakers to kill the sub panel.

I started coming off of the new box with individual circuits first was my TS. Next, I mounted a 15 amp 48" 12 outlet strip to front of my work table and put it on a 15 amp breaker. My drill press, jointer, bandsaw, and dust collector will also have dedicated circuits when I'm finished.

The only drywall I had to remove was actually the drywall mud (3/4" x 4") along the bottom of the main panel to feed the wires out to the new sub panel.
 
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