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Just finished getting the first coat of stain onto a project and got a funny stain pattern when I rubbed it out.
Jaaune and another person I can't remember have recommended "wet sanding" a stain over coat, but somehow I got a darker area not a lighter area I would have expected from glue residue. I wiped it all down with mineral spirits before staining and didn't see any clues of this
Shelf Wood Floor Hardwood Wood stain


I'm thinking to sand it out with some 100 and then some 150 before the second staining, what's your opinion???
 

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I'd try it. But. Did you have this piece of lumber laying in the sun with something on top? It looks like ultra violet staining/darkening. If the darkening is from the sun, you'll prob. have to sand deep to get past the sun stain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No, it was all SLR bought straight from the sawyer, and planed to thickness in my shop, the stock was never really in the sun at all. When applying one of the 8 raised arch pieces I did drop one with glue on it and made a bit of a mess which was why I made sure to look at them all with the MS, because I couldn't remember which one got messy
 

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Hmm. That's an unusual pattern. Normally, dark spots like that are a result of insufficient sanding in some but the pattern I'm seeing there doesn't look like something that could have resulted from uneven sanding. Try examining that area closely and see if you can spot mill marks. It's possible you never got the board completely flat while planing and the sander passed over the dips without sanding them.

That's a big enough area I'd completely sand out the bad side up to whatever grit was used to stain the rest of the piece (starting with p80 or p100 before going up is fine) and re-stain that side. Be sure to sand evenly over the entire surface and make sure those dark areas are done right.

If the dark spots were smaller and you were still in the middle of the staining process, it's possible to wet sand dark spots away by doing so with a higher grit of paper. I wouldn't attempt that however once the original stain coat has dried as it'll likely turn into a blotchy mess.
 

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It looks like the glue spill sealed the wood, and prevented it from staining some areas. I would sand to bare wood and pick a stain that achieves the desired color in one coat.
 

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Many thanks to all, the more I kept looking at the stain I just couldn't think it was glue residue because of the straight lines in the shape. I figured before I went to sanding I'd try little more mineral spirits and the stain began to lighten. I went to 000 steel wool and some more MS and it lightened to match the overall tone, I believe it was just excess stain that fully dried before I rubbed it out.

Jacob, before I applied the arch trim I had sanded the entire lower base with ROS to 180, I knew the glue goof was my only error, and I was pretty sure I scrubbed the hell out of the spill and hand sanded when dry. figured the MS couldn't make it any worse if I had to sand it all out anyway, really appreciate your help now and with the questions before with this project.

skatefriday- LOL those two KA's are still waiting for me to replace the $6 sacrificial plastic gear on the planetary drive, if you're near Washington DC, I'll let you have one for $100 and provide the info and video DIY to replace the gear, it's a messy job and since I've got two others that ARE still working, these two have been sitting.

wseand- if I wasn't going to have to see them on the altar at church I might consider your approach and describe it as a fortunate and very rare grain pattern ;-)
 

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Looks to me like it was from a wet rag when you wiped the glue off from applying the planted on piece.
The moisture raises the gran and accepts more stain making it darker. Whenever you wipe something with a wet rag you have to go over it all with sandpaper to make all the grain the same consistency.
 
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