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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Milling The Wood & The First Frame

Well I'm still at it, woodworking that is. Although I find myself building more utilitarian type projects lately then anything else. Like this one. I have two 4' x 20' raised gardens and keeping the varmints out has always been a challenge. Short of using buckshot which is frowned upon within city limits. So years past I've been getting a 50' roll of chicken wire and wrapping it around each raised garden. It works for the most part but once installed makes it a bit difficult to work in the garden and the chicken wire is not as easy and neat to install as one would think. It doesn't conform to going around square corners well and a lot of stakes have to be used to keep it straight and flush at the bottom with the top of the raised garden.

So for the past few years I've been thinking about building some frames to go around each raised garden and putting the screen/fencing material on each frame. But building a frame that's let's say is 2' x 10' that is sturdy and can withstand the weather and not fall apart because I don't want to be building new ones each year is a challenge.

Well I finally decided to give it a go. So I went and got some 2x Red Cedar and ripped it all to size. The rails and stiles of the frame are 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" and the X brace in the middle is 3/4" x 1-1/2". I was kind of surprised at the quality of the Red Cedar I picked up being 2x stock, it was relatively straight. I jointed one edge of each board before ripping them and only had to make a few passes to flatten the edge.

All the joints are lap joints and I used Titebond III with a single 12×1-1/4" stainless steel screw in each joint. I'm hoping this glue will withstand Wisconsin weather. I've not had good luck in the past with things relying on glue in the outdoors regardless of which glue I've tried and I've tried them all.

One of the issues was to cut the dadoes for the lap joints for the X brace in the right places in the top and bottom rails so that when assembled the X brace boards would line up. Using a bit of trigonometry I calculated off of center where the dadoes should be then set up stops and cut two boards and prayed. I did a dry fit with those two top and bottom rails and low and behold it looked like I got things right.

The wood all ripped, almost enough to make the 8 2' x 10' frames, then have to make 4 2' x 4' frames on top of that.


All the lap joints and dadoes cut. A prime example where a RAS is the right tool for the job. Made the milling fast and easy once set up. Can't think of a better nor faster way to do it. Anyone want to try putting lap joints on the ends of 10' boards on a table saw? Or the 45 degree dadoes for the X brace on a TS? Not I. Maybe a router with a jig but I'd still be willing to bet the RAS would be faster and easier taking into account building the jig for the router.


And one frame glued up.
 

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Milling The Wood & The First Frame

Well I'm still at it, woodworking that is. Although I find myself building more utilitarian type projects lately then anything else. Like this one. I have two 4' x 20' raised gardens and keeping the varmints out has always been a challenge. Short of using buckshot which is frowned upon within city limits. So years past I've been getting a 50' roll of chicken wire and wrapping it around each raised garden. It works for the most part but once installed makes it a bit difficult to work in the garden and the chicken wire is not as easy and neat to install as one would think. It doesn't conform to going around square corners well and a lot of stakes have to be used to keep it straight and flush at the bottom with the top of the raised garden.

So for the past few years I've been thinking about building some frames to go around each raised garden and putting the screen/fencing material on each frame. But building a frame that's let's say is 2' x 10' that is sturdy and can withstand the weather and not fall apart because I don't want to be building new ones each year is a challenge.

Well I finally decided to give it a go. So I went and got some 2x Red Cedar and ripped it all to size. The rails and stiles of the frame are 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" and the X brace in the middle is 3/4" x 1-1/2". I was kind of surprised at the quality of the Red Cedar I picked up being 2x stock, it was relatively straight. I jointed one edge of each board before ripping them and only had to make a few passes to flatten the edge.

All the joints are lap joints and I used Titebond III with a single 12×1-1/4" stainless steel screw in each joint. I'm hoping this glue will withstand Wisconsin weather. I've not had good luck in the past with things relying on glue in the outdoors regardless of which glue I've tried and I've tried them all.

One of the issues was to cut the dadoes for the lap joints for the X brace in the right places in the top and bottom rails so that when assembled the X brace boards would line up. Using a bit of trigonometry I calculated off of center where the dadoes should be then set up stops and cut two boards and prayed. I did a dry fit with those two top and bottom rails and low and behold it looked like I got things right.

The wood all ripped, almost enough to make the 8 2' x 10' frames, then have to make 4 2' x 4' frames on top of that.


All the lap joints and dadoes cut. A prime example where a RAS is the right tool for the job. Made the milling fast and easy once set up. Can't think of a better nor faster way to do it. Anyone want to try putting lap joints on the ends of 10' boards on a table saw? Or the 45 degree dadoes for the X brace on a TS? Not I. Maybe a router with a jig but I'd still be willing to bet the RAS would be faster and easier taking into account building the jig for the router.


And one frame glued up.
Cool, I want to see them done. I have had trouble with "varmits" only our's was the dog….
 

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Milling The Wood & The First Frame

Well I'm still at it, woodworking that is. Although I find myself building more utilitarian type projects lately then anything else. Like this one. I have two 4' x 20' raised gardens and keeping the varmints out has always been a challenge. Short of using buckshot which is frowned upon within city limits. So years past I've been getting a 50' roll of chicken wire and wrapping it around each raised garden. It works for the most part but once installed makes it a bit difficult to work in the garden and the chicken wire is not as easy and neat to install as one would think. It doesn't conform to going around square corners well and a lot of stakes have to be used to keep it straight and flush at the bottom with the top of the raised garden.

So for the past few years I've been thinking about building some frames to go around each raised garden and putting the screen/fencing material on each frame. But building a frame that's let's say is 2' x 10' that is sturdy and can withstand the weather and not fall apart because I don't want to be building new ones each year is a challenge.

Well I finally decided to give it a go. So I went and got some 2x Red Cedar and ripped it all to size. The rails and stiles of the frame are 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" and the X brace in the middle is 3/4" x 1-1/2". I was kind of surprised at the quality of the Red Cedar I picked up being 2x stock, it was relatively straight. I jointed one edge of each board before ripping them and only had to make a few passes to flatten the edge.

All the joints are lap joints and I used Titebond III with a single 12×1-1/4" stainless steel screw in each joint. I'm hoping this glue will withstand Wisconsin weather. I've not had good luck in the past with things relying on glue in the outdoors regardless of which glue I've tried and I've tried them all.

One of the issues was to cut the dadoes for the lap joints for the X brace in the right places in the top and bottom rails so that when assembled the X brace boards would line up. Using a bit of trigonometry I calculated off of center where the dadoes should be then set up stops and cut two boards and prayed. I did a dry fit with those two top and bottom rails and low and behold it looked like I got things right.

The wood all ripped, almost enough to make the 8 2' x 10' frames, then have to make 4 2' x 4' frames on top of that.


All the lap joints and dadoes cut. A prime example where a RAS is the right tool for the job. Made the milling fast and easy once set up. Can't think of a better nor faster way to do it. Anyone want to try putting lap joints on the ends of 10' boards on a table saw? Or the 45 degree dadoes for the X brace on a TS? Not I. Maybe a router with a jig but I'd still be willing to bet the RAS would be faster and easier taking into account building the jig for the router.


And one frame glued up.
Looks like a pretty big job Curt . look forward to more progress.
 

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Milling The Wood & The First Frame

Well I'm still at it, woodworking that is. Although I find myself building more utilitarian type projects lately then anything else. Like this one. I have two 4' x 20' raised gardens and keeping the varmints out has always been a challenge. Short of using buckshot which is frowned upon within city limits. So years past I've been getting a 50' roll of chicken wire and wrapping it around each raised garden. It works for the most part but once installed makes it a bit difficult to work in the garden and the chicken wire is not as easy and neat to install as one would think. It doesn't conform to going around square corners well and a lot of stakes have to be used to keep it straight and flush at the bottom with the top of the raised garden.

So for the past few years I've been thinking about building some frames to go around each raised garden and putting the screen/fencing material on each frame. But building a frame that's let's say is 2' x 10' that is sturdy and can withstand the weather and not fall apart because I don't want to be building new ones each year is a challenge.

Well I finally decided to give it a go. So I went and got some 2x Red Cedar and ripped it all to size. The rails and stiles of the frame are 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" and the X brace in the middle is 3/4" x 1-1/2". I was kind of surprised at the quality of the Red Cedar I picked up being 2x stock, it was relatively straight. I jointed one edge of each board before ripping them and only had to make a few passes to flatten the edge.

All the joints are lap joints and I used Titebond III with a single 12×1-1/4" stainless steel screw in each joint. I'm hoping this glue will withstand Wisconsin weather. I've not had good luck in the past with things relying on glue in the outdoors regardless of which glue I've tried and I've tried them all.

One of the issues was to cut the dadoes for the lap joints for the X brace in the right places in the top and bottom rails so that when assembled the X brace boards would line up. Using a bit of trigonometry I calculated off of center where the dadoes should be then set up stops and cut two boards and prayed. I did a dry fit with those two top and bottom rails and low and behold it looked like I got things right.

The wood all ripped, almost enough to make the 8 2' x 10' frames, then have to make 4 2' x 4' frames on top of that.


All the lap joints and dadoes cut. A prime example where a RAS is the right tool for the job. Made the milling fast and easy once set up. Can't think of a better nor faster way to do it. Anyone want to try putting lap joints on the ends of 10' boards on a table saw? Or the 45 degree dadoes for the X brace on a TS? Not I. Maybe a router with a jig but I'd still be willing to bet the RAS would be faster and easier taking into account building the jig for the router.


And one frame glued up.
sweet project, looking great :)

Welcome Back !
 

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Milling The Wood & The First Frame

Well I'm still at it, woodworking that is. Although I find myself building more utilitarian type projects lately then anything else. Like this one. I have two 4' x 20' raised gardens and keeping the varmints out has always been a challenge. Short of using buckshot which is frowned upon within city limits. So years past I've been getting a 50' roll of chicken wire and wrapping it around each raised garden. It works for the most part but once installed makes it a bit difficult to work in the garden and the chicken wire is not as easy and neat to install as one would think. It doesn't conform to going around square corners well and a lot of stakes have to be used to keep it straight and flush at the bottom with the top of the raised garden.

So for the past few years I've been thinking about building some frames to go around each raised garden and putting the screen/fencing material on each frame. But building a frame that's let's say is 2' x 10' that is sturdy and can withstand the weather and not fall apart because I don't want to be building new ones each year is a challenge.

Well I finally decided to give it a go. So I went and got some 2x Red Cedar and ripped it all to size. The rails and stiles of the frame are 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" and the X brace in the middle is 3/4" x 1-1/2". I was kind of surprised at the quality of the Red Cedar I picked up being 2x stock, it was relatively straight. I jointed one edge of each board before ripping them and only had to make a few passes to flatten the edge.

All the joints are lap joints and I used Titebond III with a single 12×1-1/4" stainless steel screw in each joint. I'm hoping this glue will withstand Wisconsin weather. I've not had good luck in the past with things relying on glue in the outdoors regardless of which glue I've tried and I've tried them all.

One of the issues was to cut the dadoes for the lap joints for the X brace in the right places in the top and bottom rails so that when assembled the X brace boards would line up. Using a bit of trigonometry I calculated off of center where the dadoes should be then set up stops and cut two boards and prayed. I did a dry fit with those two top and bottom rails and low and behold it looked like I got things right.

The wood all ripped, almost enough to make the 8 2' x 10' frames, then have to make 4 2' x 4' frames on top of that.


All the lap joints and dadoes cut. A prime example where a RAS is the right tool for the job. Made the milling fast and easy once set up. Can't think of a better nor faster way to do it. Anyone want to try putting lap joints on the ends of 10' boards on a table saw? Or the 45 degree dadoes for the X brace on a TS? Not I. Maybe a router with a jig but I'd still be willing to bet the RAS would be faster and easier taking into account building the jig for the router.


And one frame glued up.
"Just a bit of Trigonometry" he says…off the cuff….

Looks pretty cool….. I can do a half lap at the end of a board on my table saw relatively safely…I think
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Milling The Wood & The First Frame

Well I'm still at it, woodworking that is. Although I find myself building more utilitarian type projects lately then anything else. Like this one. I have two 4' x 20' raised gardens and keeping the varmints out has always been a challenge. Short of using buckshot which is frowned upon within city limits. So years past I've been getting a 50' roll of chicken wire and wrapping it around each raised garden. It works for the most part but once installed makes it a bit difficult to work in the garden and the chicken wire is not as easy and neat to install as one would think. It doesn't conform to going around square corners well and a lot of stakes have to be used to keep it straight and flush at the bottom with the top of the raised garden.

So for the past few years I've been thinking about building some frames to go around each raised garden and putting the screen/fencing material on each frame. But building a frame that's let's say is 2' x 10' that is sturdy and can withstand the weather and not fall apart because I don't want to be building new ones each year is a challenge.

Well I finally decided to give it a go. So I went and got some 2x Red Cedar and ripped it all to size. The rails and stiles of the frame are 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" and the X brace in the middle is 3/4" x 1-1/2". I was kind of surprised at the quality of the Red Cedar I picked up being 2x stock, it was relatively straight. I jointed one edge of each board before ripping them and only had to make a few passes to flatten the edge.

All the joints are lap joints and I used Titebond III with a single 12×1-1/4" stainless steel screw in each joint. I'm hoping this glue will withstand Wisconsin weather. I've not had good luck in the past with things relying on glue in the outdoors regardless of which glue I've tried and I've tried them all.

One of the issues was to cut the dadoes for the lap joints for the X brace in the right places in the top and bottom rails so that when assembled the X brace boards would line up. Using a bit of trigonometry I calculated off of center where the dadoes should be then set up stops and cut two boards and prayed. I did a dry fit with those two top and bottom rails and low and behold it looked like I got things right.

The wood all ripped, almost enough to make the 8 2' x 10' frames, then have to make 4 2' x 4' frames on top of that.


All the lap joints and dadoes cut. A prime example where a RAS is the right tool for the job. Made the milling fast and easy once set up. Can't think of a better nor faster way to do it. Anyone want to try putting lap joints on the ends of 10' boards on a table saw? Or the 45 degree dadoes for the X brace on a TS? Not I. Maybe a router with a jig but I'd still be willing to bet the RAS would be faster and easier taking into account building the jig for the router.


And one frame glued up.
LOL @ the trig, yeah it always surprises me I still remember that stuff but I do use it quite often for stuff like this.

And yeah I've done half laps on the TS, but on relatively short stock, not on the end of a 10' piece of wood, that seems to me to be a bit unwieldy. Especially with the typical miter gauge, even if the fence on it is a foot or two, a 10' board hanging off it is just a lot to flop around.

Here's my rough sketch, not to scale of course, was surprised I got it right the first time, Murphy must be on vacation.
 

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Milling The Wood & The First Frame

Well I'm still at it, woodworking that is. Although I find myself building more utilitarian type projects lately then anything else. Like this one. I have two 4' x 20' raised gardens and keeping the varmints out has always been a challenge. Short of using buckshot which is frowned upon within city limits. So years past I've been getting a 50' roll of chicken wire and wrapping it around each raised garden. It works for the most part but once installed makes it a bit difficult to work in the garden and the chicken wire is not as easy and neat to install as one would think. It doesn't conform to going around square corners well and a lot of stakes have to be used to keep it straight and flush at the bottom with the top of the raised garden.

So for the past few years I've been thinking about building some frames to go around each raised garden and putting the screen/fencing material on each frame. But building a frame that's let's say is 2' x 10' that is sturdy and can withstand the weather and not fall apart because I don't want to be building new ones each year is a challenge.

Well I finally decided to give it a go. So I went and got some 2x Red Cedar and ripped it all to size. The rails and stiles of the frame are 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" and the X brace in the middle is 3/4" x 1-1/2". I was kind of surprised at the quality of the Red Cedar I picked up being 2x stock, it was relatively straight. I jointed one edge of each board before ripping them and only had to make a few passes to flatten the edge.

All the joints are lap joints and I used Titebond III with a single 12×1-1/4" stainless steel screw in each joint. I'm hoping this glue will withstand Wisconsin weather. I've not had good luck in the past with things relying on glue in the outdoors regardless of which glue I've tried and I've tried them all.

One of the issues was to cut the dadoes for the lap joints for the X brace in the right places in the top and bottom rails so that when assembled the X brace boards would line up. Using a bit of trigonometry I calculated off of center where the dadoes should be then set up stops and cut two boards and prayed. I did a dry fit with those two top and bottom rails and low and behold it looked like I got things right.

The wood all ripped, almost enough to make the 8 2' x 10' frames, then have to make 4 2' x 4' frames on top of that.


All the lap joints and dadoes cut. A prime example where a RAS is the right tool for the job. Made the milling fast and easy once set up. Can't think of a better nor faster way to do it. Anyone want to try putting lap joints on the ends of 10' boards on a table saw? Or the 45 degree dadoes for the X brace on a TS? Not I. Maybe a router with a jig but I'd still be willing to bet the RAS would be faster and easier taking into account building the jig for the router.


And one frame glued up.
Ya…I noticed AFTER I posted that there were half laps on the long pieces too…that would be almost impossible to do on a table saw….you are correct…RAS with a dado blade or a router with a jig would be the way I would have gone seeing how I don't own a RAS!
 

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Milling The Wood & The First Frame

Well I'm still at it, woodworking that is. Although I find myself building more utilitarian type projects lately then anything else. Like this one. I have two 4' x 20' raised gardens and keeping the varmints out has always been a challenge. Short of using buckshot which is frowned upon within city limits. So years past I've been getting a 50' roll of chicken wire and wrapping it around each raised garden. It works for the most part but once installed makes it a bit difficult to work in the garden and the chicken wire is not as easy and neat to install as one would think. It doesn't conform to going around square corners well and a lot of stakes have to be used to keep it straight and flush at the bottom with the top of the raised garden.

So for the past few years I've been thinking about building some frames to go around each raised garden and putting the screen/fencing material on each frame. But building a frame that's let's say is 2' x 10' that is sturdy and can withstand the weather and not fall apart because I don't want to be building new ones each year is a challenge.

Well I finally decided to give it a go. So I went and got some 2x Red Cedar and ripped it all to size. The rails and stiles of the frame are 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" and the X brace in the middle is 3/4" x 1-1/2". I was kind of surprised at the quality of the Red Cedar I picked up being 2x stock, it was relatively straight. I jointed one edge of each board before ripping them and only had to make a few passes to flatten the edge.

All the joints are lap joints and I used Titebond III with a single 12×1-1/4" stainless steel screw in each joint. I'm hoping this glue will withstand Wisconsin weather. I've not had good luck in the past with things relying on glue in the outdoors regardless of which glue I've tried and I've tried them all.

One of the issues was to cut the dadoes for the lap joints for the X brace in the right places in the top and bottom rails so that when assembled the X brace boards would line up. Using a bit of trigonometry I calculated off of center where the dadoes should be then set up stops and cut two boards and prayed. I did a dry fit with those two top and bottom rails and low and behold it looked like I got things right.

The wood all ripped, almost enough to make the 8 2' x 10' frames, then have to make 4 2' x 4' frames on top of that.


All the lap joints and dadoes cut. A prime example where a RAS is the right tool for the job. Made the milling fast and easy once set up. Can't think of a better nor faster way to do it. Anyone want to try putting lap joints on the ends of 10' boards on a table saw? Or the 45 degree dadoes for the X brace on a TS? Not I. Maybe a router with a jig but I'd still be willing to bet the RAS would be faster and easier taking into account building the jig for the router.


And one frame glued up.
Blankman:
That looks like a good project - nice lumber. I like the X layout and will look great when finished.
Last season I built 2 small raised planters in a hurry for my wife and drilled holes along each top and bent some heavy wire to make Hoops whose ends fitted into the holes. I attached some 3/4" plastic netting to the hoops to keeps the birds out and kitties. The hoop/net cover has worked well because you can just lift a part or all of the cover off in seconds, replacement is the same. We found the birds needed to be kept out - and it worked.
Good luck with your project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
8 Done, 4 To Go

Well I got the eight 10 footers done, now have to make the four 4 footers. Got the rest of the Red Cedar cut and milled too. This little project has set me back $175 for the Western Cedar, on sale at that, and $30 for the Stainless Steel Screws so far. Good thing I didn't do a cost analysis first. It just kinda amazes me that I dropped 200 bucks on something this simple, hope it works and lasts. If nothing else it will look better and make it easier to tend the gardens so at least it has that going for it…

I just did a quick calculation, I used 82.5 board feet to do this. No wonder.

The remainder of the Cedar ready to be assembled.


And the eight 10 footers done.
 

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8 Done, 4 To Go

Well I got the eight 10 footers done, now have to make the four 4 footers. Got the rest of the Red Cedar cut and milled too. This little project has set me back $175 for the Western Cedar, on sale at that, and $30 for the Stainless Steel Screws so far. Good thing I didn't do a cost analysis first. It just kinda amazes me that I dropped 200 bucks on something this simple, hope it works and lasts. If nothing else it will look better and make it easier to tend the gardens so at least it has that going for it…

I just did a quick calculation, I used 82.5 board feet to do this. No wonder.

The remainder of the Cedar ready to be assembled.


And the eight 10 footers done.
Wow Curt thats a lot of half lapping going on ,it's commong along very well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
8 Done, 4 To Go

Well I got the eight 10 footers done, now have to make the four 4 footers. Got the rest of the Red Cedar cut and milled too. This little project has set me back $175 for the Western Cedar, on sale at that, and $30 for the Stainless Steel Screws so far. Good thing I didn't do a cost analysis first. It just kinda amazes me that I dropped 200 bucks on something this simple, hope it works and lasts. If nothing else it will look better and make it easier to tend the gardens so at least it has that going for it…

I just did a quick calculation, I used 82.5 board feet to do this. No wonder.

The remainder of the Cedar ready to be assembled.


And the eight 10 footers done.
LOL You're tellin' me Jim, very repetitive, felt like I was on an assembly line… I prayed I didn't flip the board wrong and put one in the wrong place. And so far it's looking ok.
 

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8 Done, 4 To Go

Well I got the eight 10 footers done, now have to make the four 4 footers. Got the rest of the Red Cedar cut and milled too. This little project has set me back $175 for the Western Cedar, on sale at that, and $30 for the Stainless Steel Screws so far. Good thing I didn't do a cost analysis first. It just kinda amazes me that I dropped 200 bucks on something this simple, hope it works and lasts. If nothing else it will look better and make it easier to tend the gardens so at least it has that going for it…

I just did a quick calculation, I used 82.5 board feet to do this. No wonder.

The remainder of the Cedar ready to be assembled.


And the eight 10 footers done.
Looks like you can buy lettuce cheaper than fixing a place to grow it ;-))
 

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8 Done, 4 To Go

Well I got the eight 10 footers done, now have to make the four 4 footers. Got the rest of the Red Cedar cut and milled too. This little project has set me back $175 for the Western Cedar, on sale at that, and $30 for the Stainless Steel Screws so far. Good thing I didn't do a cost analysis first. It just kinda amazes me that I dropped 200 bucks on something this simple, hope it works and lasts. If nothing else it will look better and make it easier to tend the gardens so at least it has that going for it…

I just did a quick calculation, I used 82.5 board feet to do this. No wonder.

The remainder of the Cedar ready to be assembled.


And the eight 10 footers done.
hmm, thats actually not as bad as if you bought cedar here in the northeast… might have cost you twice that much which is why I still can't make myself get the lumber for a raised bed for our veggies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
8 Done, 4 To Go

Well I got the eight 10 footers done, now have to make the four 4 footers. Got the rest of the Red Cedar cut and milled too. This little project has set me back $175 for the Western Cedar, on sale at that, and $30 for the Stainless Steel Screws so far. Good thing I didn't do a cost analysis first. It just kinda amazes me that I dropped 200 bucks on something this simple, hope it works and lasts. If nothing else it will look better and make it easier to tend the gardens so at least it has that going for it…

I just did a quick calculation, I used 82.5 board feet to do this. No wonder.

The remainder of the Cedar ready to be assembled.


And the eight 10 footers done.
Yeah I can buy a lot of vegies for that. And if you take into account building the two raised gardens originally and filling them with 8 yards of dirt, I'd be in vegies for years…

And I'd have to agree, ~$2 a board foot ain't a bad price at all. Just a surprise I guess cuz once I determined how much wood I would need then went and picked it up it added up fast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
All built, 4 Footers Stained

Well all the frames are built, eight 2' x 10' and four 2' x 4'. Next step is to stain them all and add the chicken wire fencing.

All twelve glued up


Here are the four smaller ones stained using a all weather neutral/natural stain. It sure did bring out the red tones in the Western Cedar. I do like how that looks.
 

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All built, 4 Footers Stained

Well all the frames are built, eight 2' x 10' and four 2' x 4'. Next step is to stain them all and add the chicken wire fencing.

All twelve glued up


Here are the four smaller ones stained using a all weather neutral/natural stain. It sure did bring out the red tones in the Western Cedar. I do like how that looks.
looks awesome. would love to see this thing installed in it's final location.
 

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All built, 4 Footers Stained

Well all the frames are built, eight 2' x 10' and four 2' x 4'. Next step is to stain them all and add the chicken wire fencing.

All twelve glued up


Here are the four smaller ones stained using a all weather neutral/natural stain. It sure did bring out the red tones in the Western Cedar. I do like how that looks.
Curt, what are you fencing out with these?
 

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All built, 4 Footers Stained

Well all the frames are built, eight 2' x 10' and four 2' x 4'. Next step is to stain them all and add the chicken wire fencing.

All twelve glued up


Here are the four smaller ones stained using a all weather neutral/natural stain. It sure did bring out the red tones in the Western Cedar. I do like how that looks.
Itsall comming together good work Curt
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
All built, 4 Footers Stained

Well all the frames are built, eight 2' x 10' and four 2' x 4'. Next step is to stain them all and add the chicken wire fencing.

All twelve glued up


Here are the four smaller ones stained using a all weather neutral/natural stain. It sure did bring out the red tones in the Western Cedar. I do like how that looks.
They're going around two raised gardens I have each 4' x 20' where I grow vegetables, to keep mainly the rabbits out. Those little varmints will mow down kohlrabi, broccoli, and cauliflower first then move on to green beans and what ever else, take them right down to the ground. And we have a lot of rabbits around.

If all goes well weather wise, it's raining right now and at the moment forecast says some amount of rain through Sunday, I'm hoping to have them all stained and installed this weekend. So I'll get some pictures up then. And I'm staining them outdoors cuz I can slop it on thick and not worry about the mess.
 

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All built, 4 Footers Stained

Well all the frames are built, eight 2' x 10' and four 2' x 4'. Next step is to stain them all and add the chicken wire fencing.

All twelve glued up


Here are the four smaller ones stained using a all weather neutral/natural stain. It sure did bring out the red tones in the Western Cedar. I do like how that looks.
I'm working on a similar fence but I'm using dog-eared western cedar fence boards because they were cheap. Your fence looks a lot nicer.

How are you going to install the fences?

I want to be able to take the whole fence down to work in the garden then just put it back up. Still trying to figure out a quick cheap system. I'm thinking about using bungee toggle ball ties to tie the four pieces together. Maybe but a block in the corners with a hole drilled through it to tie the toggles to.
 
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