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Two weeks ago, I purchased an older Grizzly G1023 table saw. I originally considered extending the rails to increase my rip capacity to 48" for halving a sheet of plywood but now i'm thinking if the length shouldn't be longer to accommodate something longer.

For those with longer rails, what length did you select and why? I just like to get some insight to the thinking and rational so i'm regretting something later.

thanks…...
 

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I don't have the Grizzly saw but I opted for 36" rails instead of 30" or 52" rails on my saw for a couple reasons.

Standard cabinet height is 34-1/2", so 36" rip capacity means I won't have to do anything crazy. (Also the fence on the 36" rails is better-quality on my saw.)

Even though 52" would have been nice, the extra 16" would have made it much harder to move my saw around in my shop. I don't have space for a big infeed table, so an 8×4 sheet would be too unwieldy to wrangle onto my table saw anyway. When I need to break down an 8×4 sheet I just use a track saw or my circular saw with a zero-clearance straightedge guide.

I also decided that if I ever need to upgrade to longer rails, I might as well step up to an Incra fence system.
 

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52" rip is pretty standard. Haven't seen anything bigger on a standard cabinet saw. If you really have to cross it a lot of 4'x8' ply, you'd probably get a track saw or a panel saw. Crosscutting a full sheet of ply longer than 4' against the fence I would think gets a little hairy.
 

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I'm in the process of building my table saw base. I had the same thought of wanting long enough rails for my fence to be able to rip a full-size sheet of plywood in half. I found a YouTube video from Laney Shaughnessey on building his table saw base (
). I decided to make mine longer simply because I have the space in my shop for it. My saw is an old Craftsman contractor saw and I've put a Delta T2 fence on it. I built an extension where I'll mount a router later on and be able to use the fence for both tools. My plan is to buy the angle iron and square steel tubing to make the fence rails go the entire length of the table (approx. 80"). That will end up giving me right around 52" from the right side of my blade to the end of the table. Personally, I don't see the need for anything more than a 48" capacity (and I really don't plan on using that too often). If I'm working with 10-12' boards I'll cut them to size with the miter saw first.
 

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I don t have the Grizzly saw but I opted for 36" rails instead of 30" or 52" rails on my saw for a couple reasons.

Standard cabinet height is 34-1/2", so 36" rip capacity means I won t have to do anything crazy. (Also the fence on the 36" rails is better-quality on my saw.)

Even though 52" would have been nice, the extra 16" would have made it much harder to move my saw around in my shop. I don t have space for a big infeed table, so an 8×4 sheet would be too unwieldy to wrangle onto my table saw anyway. When I need to break down an 8×4 sheet I just use a track saw or my circular saw with a zero-clearance straightedge guide.

I also decided that if I ever need to upgrade to longer rails, I might as well step up to an Incra fence system.

- Rob
+1 on all counts.
 

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I bought a 32" aftermarket fence for my Delta Contractors saw and then moved the rails over to allow 36" capacity.

For large pieces I use a circular saw to break the pieces down to a little over the finish size and then trim on the table saw.

The longer rails would be useful to cross-cut a sheet of plywood, but in my shop that would require a helper to move it through the saw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I m in the process of building my table saw base. I had the same thought of wanting long enough rails for my fence to be able to rip a full-size sheet of plywood in half. I found a YouTube video from Laney Shaughnessey on building his table saw base (
). I decided to make mine longer simply because I have the space in my shop for it. My saw is an old Craftsman contractor saw and I ve put a Delta T2 fence on it. I built an extension where I ll mount a router later on and be able to use the fence for both tools. My plan is to buy the angle iron and square steel tubing to make the fence rails go the entire length of the table (approx. 80"). That will end up giving me right around 52" from the right side of my blade to the end of the table. Personally, I don t see the need for anything more than a 48" capacity (and I really don t plan on using that too often). If I m working with 10-12 boards I ll cut them to size with the miter saw first.

- Sparks8286
Sparks…....can you fix your link. curious to see the vid.
 
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