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the heart stopper

I've made quite a few segmented wine bottle stoppers now. I want to continue to push myself with in complexity and creativity… so I've got a new design that I've been working on. In this piece I use two species of wood (maple and mahogany) to create a heart shaped pattern with the segmented pieces. I am acutally now working on the second version of the heart stopper design. I was fairly pleased with the first, but I thought I could do better.

To give an idea of how it's assembled, here's a view of the 1st blank before turning. This piece includes 183 individual pieces.


The turned piece looks like this


while happy with the overall results, I wanted to make the heart a little smaller so it could be viewed in its entirety without having to twist the stopper. So i made some adjustments to my tablesaw sled to cut some smaller segments and I finished assembly of the new blank today and hope to turn it this weekend. There are 207 pieces included in this version.


I'll be sure to post pics of the finished piece… good or bad!
any and all feedback is appreciated.
Very nice!

That's what I like about segmented turnings, you don't exactly know what the end results

will be.
 

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the heart stopper

I've made quite a few segmented wine bottle stoppers now. I want to continue to push myself with in complexity and creativity… so I've got a new design that I've been working on. In this piece I use two species of wood (maple and mahogany) to create a heart shaped pattern with the segmented pieces. I am acutally now working on the second version of the heart stopper design. I was fairly pleased with the first, but I thought I could do better.

To give an idea of how it's assembled, here's a view of the 1st blank before turning. This piece includes 183 individual pieces.


The turned piece looks like this


while happy with the overall results, I wanted to make the heart a little smaller so it could be viewed in its entirety without having to twist the stopper. So i made some adjustments to my tablesaw sled to cut some smaller segments and I finished assembly of the new blank today and hope to turn it this weekend. There are 207 pieces included in this version.


I'll be sure to post pics of the finished piece… good or bad!
any and all feedback is appreciated.
Fantastic! Your segmented pieces are always outstanding. Thanks for the design info.

Keep it up.

Scrappy
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
the heart stopper

I've made quite a few segmented wine bottle stoppers now. I want to continue to push myself with in complexity and creativity… so I've got a new design that I've been working on. In this piece I use two species of wood (maple and mahogany) to create a heart shaped pattern with the segmented pieces. I am acutally now working on the second version of the heart stopper design. I was fairly pleased with the first, but I thought I could do better.

To give an idea of how it's assembled, here's a view of the 1st blank before turning. This piece includes 183 individual pieces.


The turned piece looks like this


while happy with the overall results, I wanted to make the heart a little smaller so it could be viewed in its entirety without having to twist the stopper. So i made some adjustments to my tablesaw sled to cut some smaller segments and I finished assembly of the new blank today and hope to turn it this weekend. There are 207 pieces included in this version.


I'll be sure to post pics of the finished piece… good or bad!
any and all feedback is appreciated.
Thank you all for the support, here's the now turned Heart Stopper…
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Segmented bowl with floating bottom

Being a fan of segmented turning I joined the group Segmented Woodturners, a chapter of the AAW, earlier this year. While I've made quite a few segmented turnings, I have not yet made a segmented bowl… well until now!

The current preseident of the Segmented Woodturners group is Malcolm Tibbets, an astonishly talented turner. Malcolm has written a book on segmented turning and has also produced four dvd's on the subject. With Malcolm's advice and encouragement, I incorporated his floating bottom technique in my first bowl. The floating bottom is used to prevent damage to a piece due to wood movement.

Here is a series of pictures that covers the process:

yes, there is a hole at the bottom… it's actually designed that way!


the base has a recess to hold a floating bottom.


the floating bottom is a single piece of pine, turned to a diameter of about 2". the floating bottom is just shy of 1/4" thick.


the floating bottom is kept in place with this "keeper ring" made of ten segments. there is a 1-3/8" diameter hole in the middle and the ring is about 2" in diameter.


the floating bottom in place.


the keeper ring installed. The keeper ring was designed to be about 1/8" shorter than the base of the bowl.


a top view showing the floating bottom in place.


the bowl is 2-3/4" tall. 4-1/2" wide at the top. 2-3/4" wide at the base. the wall thickness is a fat 1/8".

for dry items or display purposes the floating bottom seems to be the way to go. If you want to use any sort of liquid… you'd be better off taking your chances with a solid bottom.
 

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Segmented bowl with floating bottom

Being a fan of segmented turning I joined the group Segmented Woodturners, a chapter of the AAW, earlier this year. While I've made quite a few segmented turnings, I have not yet made a segmented bowl… well until now!

The current preseident of the Segmented Woodturners group is Malcolm Tibbets, an astonishly talented turner. Malcolm has written a book on segmented turning and has also produced four dvd's on the subject. With Malcolm's advice and encouragement, I incorporated his floating bottom technique in my first bowl. The floating bottom is used to prevent damage to a piece due to wood movement.

Here is a series of pictures that covers the process:

yes, there is a hole at the bottom… it's actually designed that way!


the base has a recess to hold a floating bottom.


the floating bottom is a single piece of pine, turned to a diameter of about 2". the floating bottom is just shy of 1/4" thick.


the floating bottom is kept in place with this "keeper ring" made of ten segments. there is a 1-3/8" diameter hole in the middle and the ring is about 2" in diameter.


the floating bottom in place.


the keeper ring installed. The keeper ring was designed to be about 1/8" shorter than the base of the bowl.


a top view showing the floating bottom in place.


the bowl is 2-3/4" tall. 4-1/2" wide at the top. 2-3/4" wide at the base. the wall thickness is a fat 1/8".

for dry items or display purposes the floating bottom seems to be the way to go. If you want to use any sort of liquid… you'd be better off taking your chances with a solid bottom.
So that's how you guys do it!!!!
 

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Segmented bowl with floating bottom

Being a fan of segmented turning I joined the group Segmented Woodturners, a chapter of the AAW, earlier this year. While I've made quite a few segmented turnings, I have not yet made a segmented bowl… well until now!

The current preseident of the Segmented Woodturners group is Malcolm Tibbets, an astonishly talented turner. Malcolm has written a book on segmented turning and has also produced four dvd's on the subject. With Malcolm's advice and encouragement, I incorporated his floating bottom technique in my first bowl. The floating bottom is used to prevent damage to a piece due to wood movement.

Here is a series of pictures that covers the process:

yes, there is a hole at the bottom… it's actually designed that way!


the base has a recess to hold a floating bottom.


the floating bottom is a single piece of pine, turned to a diameter of about 2". the floating bottom is just shy of 1/4" thick.


the floating bottom is kept in place with this "keeper ring" made of ten segments. there is a 1-3/8" diameter hole in the middle and the ring is about 2" in diameter.


the floating bottom in place.


the keeper ring installed. The keeper ring was designed to be about 1/8" shorter than the base of the bowl.


a top view showing the floating bottom in place.


the bowl is 2-3/4" tall. 4-1/2" wide at the top. 2-3/4" wide at the base. the wall thickness is a fat 1/8".

for dry items or display purposes the floating bottom seems to be the way to go. If you want to use any sort of liquid… you'd be better off taking your chances with a solid bottom.
cool…i love seeing how you have really transformed as a woodworker…its been fun to watch.
 

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Segmented bowl with floating bottom

Being a fan of segmented turning I joined the group Segmented Woodturners, a chapter of the AAW, earlier this year. While I've made quite a few segmented turnings, I have not yet made a segmented bowl… well until now!

The current preseident of the Segmented Woodturners group is Malcolm Tibbets, an astonishly talented turner. Malcolm has written a book on segmented turning and has also produced four dvd's on the subject. With Malcolm's advice and encouragement, I incorporated his floating bottom technique in my first bowl. The floating bottom is used to prevent damage to a piece due to wood movement.

Here is a series of pictures that covers the process:

yes, there is a hole at the bottom… it's actually designed that way!


the base has a recess to hold a floating bottom.


the floating bottom is a single piece of pine, turned to a diameter of about 2". the floating bottom is just shy of 1/4" thick.


the floating bottom is kept in place with this "keeper ring" made of ten segments. there is a 1-3/8" diameter hole in the middle and the ring is about 2" in diameter.


the floating bottom in place.


the keeper ring installed. The keeper ring was designed to be about 1/8" shorter than the base of the bowl.


a top view showing the floating bottom in place.


the bowl is 2-3/4" tall. 4-1/2" wide at the top. 2-3/4" wide at the base. the wall thickness is a fat 1/8".

for dry items or display purposes the floating bottom seems to be the way to go. If you want to use any sort of liquid… you'd be better off taking your chances with a solid bottom.
I have never seen this design before.
It certainly makes sense,
you did a great job with the piece,
and the blog.
Nice work Darryl,

Lisa
 

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Segmented bowl with floating bottom

Being a fan of segmented turning I joined the group Segmented Woodturners, a chapter of the AAW, earlier this year. While I've made quite a few segmented turnings, I have not yet made a segmented bowl… well until now!

The current preseident of the Segmented Woodturners group is Malcolm Tibbets, an astonishly talented turner. Malcolm has written a book on segmented turning and has also produced four dvd's on the subject. With Malcolm's advice and encouragement, I incorporated his floating bottom technique in my first bowl. The floating bottom is used to prevent damage to a piece due to wood movement.

Here is a series of pictures that covers the process:

yes, there is a hole at the bottom… it's actually designed that way!


the base has a recess to hold a floating bottom.


the floating bottom is a single piece of pine, turned to a diameter of about 2". the floating bottom is just shy of 1/4" thick.


the floating bottom is kept in place with this "keeper ring" made of ten segments. there is a 1-3/8" diameter hole in the middle and the ring is about 2" in diameter.


the floating bottom in place.


the keeper ring installed. The keeper ring was designed to be about 1/8" shorter than the base of the bowl.


a top view showing the floating bottom in place.


the bowl is 2-3/4" tall. 4-1/2" wide at the top. 2-3/4" wide at the base. the wall thickness is a fat 1/8".

for dry items or display purposes the floating bottom seems to be the way to go. If you want to use any sort of liquid… you'd be better off taking your chances with a solid bottom.
Great turning, Darryl!

These segments must certainly be easier to cut than those for your bottle stoppers!

Does the keeper ring wedge into place or is it glued in?

Lew
 

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1,122 Posts
Segmented bowl with floating bottom

Being a fan of segmented turning I joined the group Segmented Woodturners, a chapter of the AAW, earlier this year. While I've made quite a few segmented turnings, I have not yet made a segmented bowl… well until now!

The current preseident of the Segmented Woodturners group is Malcolm Tibbets, an astonishly talented turner. Malcolm has written a book on segmented turning and has also produced four dvd's on the subject. With Malcolm's advice and encouragement, I incorporated his floating bottom technique in my first bowl. The floating bottom is used to prevent damage to a piece due to wood movement.

Here is a series of pictures that covers the process:

yes, there is a hole at the bottom… it's actually designed that way!


the base has a recess to hold a floating bottom.


the floating bottom is a single piece of pine, turned to a diameter of about 2". the floating bottom is just shy of 1/4" thick.


the floating bottom is kept in place with this "keeper ring" made of ten segments. there is a 1-3/8" diameter hole in the middle and the ring is about 2" in diameter.


the floating bottom in place.


the keeper ring installed. The keeper ring was designed to be about 1/8" shorter than the base of the bowl.


a top view showing the floating bottom in place.


the bowl is 2-3/4" tall. 4-1/2" wide at the top. 2-3/4" wide at the base. the wall thickness is a fat 1/8".

for dry items or display purposes the floating bottom seems to be the way to go. If you want to use any sort of liquid… you'd be better off taking your chances with a solid bottom.
Darryl, your segmented bowl with the floating bottom shows what height you have reached in your turning skill. It is an amazing piece of wood working.
Hope you will add many more novelties to your projects.

Sharad
 

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Segmented bowl with floating bottom

Being a fan of segmented turning I joined the group Segmented Woodturners, a chapter of the AAW, earlier this year. While I've made quite a few segmented turnings, I have not yet made a segmented bowl… well until now!

The current preseident of the Segmented Woodturners group is Malcolm Tibbets, an astonishly talented turner. Malcolm has written a book on segmented turning and has also produced four dvd's on the subject. With Malcolm's advice and encouragement, I incorporated his floating bottom technique in my first bowl. The floating bottom is used to prevent damage to a piece due to wood movement.

Here is a series of pictures that covers the process:

yes, there is a hole at the bottom… it's actually designed that way!


the base has a recess to hold a floating bottom.


the floating bottom is a single piece of pine, turned to a diameter of about 2". the floating bottom is just shy of 1/4" thick.


the floating bottom is kept in place with this "keeper ring" made of ten segments. there is a 1-3/8" diameter hole in the middle and the ring is about 2" in diameter.


the floating bottom in place.


the keeper ring installed. The keeper ring was designed to be about 1/8" shorter than the base of the bowl.


a top view showing the floating bottom in place.


the bowl is 2-3/4" tall. 4-1/2" wide at the top. 2-3/4" wide at the base. the wall thickness is a fat 1/8".

for dry items or display purposes the floating bottom seems to be the way to go. If you want to use any sort of liquid… you'd be better off taking your chances with a solid bottom.
Nice blog.
Your turnings are very nice.
Thanks for posting
 

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Registered
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8,861 Posts
Segmented bowl with floating bottom

Being a fan of segmented turning I joined the group Segmented Woodturners, a chapter of the AAW, earlier this year. While I've made quite a few segmented turnings, I have not yet made a segmented bowl… well until now!

The current preseident of the Segmented Woodturners group is Malcolm Tibbets, an astonishly talented turner. Malcolm has written a book on segmented turning and has also produced four dvd's on the subject. With Malcolm's advice and encouragement, I incorporated his floating bottom technique in my first bowl. The floating bottom is used to prevent damage to a piece due to wood movement.

Here is a series of pictures that covers the process:

yes, there is a hole at the bottom… it's actually designed that way!


the base has a recess to hold a floating bottom.


the floating bottom is a single piece of pine, turned to a diameter of about 2". the floating bottom is just shy of 1/4" thick.


the floating bottom is kept in place with this "keeper ring" made of ten segments. there is a 1-3/8" diameter hole in the middle and the ring is about 2" in diameter.


the floating bottom in place.


the keeper ring installed. The keeper ring was designed to be about 1/8" shorter than the base of the bowl.


a top view showing the floating bottom in place.


the bowl is 2-3/4" tall. 4-1/2" wide at the top. 2-3/4" wide at the base. the wall thickness is a fat 1/8".

for dry items or display purposes the floating bottom seems to be the way to go. If you want to use any sort of liquid… you'd be better off taking your chances with a solid bottom.
Very nice,

I'll have to try this sometime.
 
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