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I installed 8 Masonite pre hung solid core doors. Although difficult to install (my first time), they look very good-plumb, square and consistent gap. However, one door does not want to stay in the open position. It wants to swing close. A level indicates it is plumb but it was one of the more difficult doors to install. What could be wrong and how do I fix it? Thanks in advance for your replies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, here is the rest of the story. I had the door totally installed, putty in screw holes and painted. The door hung perfectly and did not close by itself. Here was the problem….when installing the door molding there was a 1/2" gap between the jamb and the molding that I could not close up without a big ugly swath of painters caulk, and the door did not close evenly with the door stop (appr. 1/2" gap at top of door, bottom of door was tight against door stop). So I cut the screws off the latch side of the frame and the top screws on the hinge side and squared the jamb in the rough opening. This helped the door molding problem and the gap between the door and the door stop, but now it wants the swing closed by itself. The door is very plumb one way (the edge side of the jamb) and slightly out the other way (the face side of the jamb).
Should I totally remove the door and jamb and start over?
 

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Your problem is your opening is not square and your walls are not plumb. I know, I've been there. If you plumb the doors perfectly, then there are big gaps between either the casing and the jambs or the casing and the wall. Sometimes both.

So, the easiest solution is to bend a pin or two. But your hinge might squeak. If it does start to squeak and you can't stand it, then you need to rehang the door and make everything plumb and square. There are a lot of articles available on the web as to how to hang prehung doors. It isn't hard.

But what these articles don't tell you is how to case out the door when the jamb faces aren't flush with the door. What would be ideal is a jamb which is about 6 inches wide. Then , when you hang the door, you can cut and plane away anything that is proud of the face of the wall. But you don't have that. So, what you will need to do is build up the width of the jamb to cover the gaps. You'll need to cut strips that you have scribed. This is beyond what I can write here. Maybe try a google search on "scribing casing" and see what yo ucome up with. If you ain't good at picturing things in 3d in your brain, scribing things to fit can appear to be black magic. But it works.

Good Luck

Rick
 

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I'm far from an expert on hanging doors, but I do own two houses with lots of doors. Look at it from the consumer side. What does the customer want. I know for me it is "plumb, level and square". You can't rebuild the house, but I think you should do what it takes so your part of the work is "plumb, level and sqare".
 
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