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VT's Poker Case

Here is my next project. I have been following Bob Babcock and company's blog "Design. Click. Build." on how to use Sketchup over at www.finewoodworking.com . I love working in Sketchup and this seemed like a good piece of software (since it was free and is relatively easy to learn) to design a case for my poker chips.

My buds and wife and I have been playing poker on a semi-regular basis, and for whatever reason, it seems like we bought the chips. We got them on sale and they are in those spinning octagons.

Chip Spindles

Those are fine if they stay on a shelf and only get brought out at home. The problem is that we end up going over to the other players' houses for the most part so that no one has to host the game all the time. This leads to us bringing the two spindles over in their cardboard boxes and the chips inevitably fall all over the place and that just drives me nuts. So, I says to myself, "Self, you need to make some cool looking box to hold the chips. This is a perfect opportunity to build your skills in wood and on your computer." I spent a long time designing the case after looking all over the place for examples (there are very few of those out there, by the way). Part of the length of time had to do with how busy I was at the end of the school year (I am a High school teacher by day, and the student government advisor to boot so the end of the school year is my busiest time of year and I had very little time in the shop in April and May). I was also delayed in the building of this by a month long vacation to Europe with my wife. We hit 6 countries and had a blast. If you want to read our travel journal (my wife did all the work on this, she loves the Yahoo travel), just click on the link below

http://travel.yahoo.com/trip-view-1085877-europe_adventure;_ylt=AtnsNYud_Q6_g053B26K9_KfItAF

If that doesn't work, just go to the travel section of Yahoo.com and search for Team VT, that's us.

Well, now that I have cleaned up the sketchup file and put dimensions on it for my own use, I thought I would actually start a blog on building this poker chip case. The textures in the picture are just approximations of what I wanted it to look like. I have a chunk of 8/4 maple that I plan on resawing into the sides, but I hadn't actually bought the wood for the contrasting color until just recently. I found some nice Padauk with a good reddish color to use for the contrasting color. The colors of the school that I work at are Red and White and since most of the people who play poker with us are teachers at my school, I thought it would be appropriate to try to get something close.

Case Poker Chips Open

Case Poker Chips closed

I didn't feel up to actually drawing in the hardware and handle yet, but I intend to pick something up when I get to that point. I have also been toying with hand chopping dovetails instead of the finger joints that I had originally intended. We shall see, I need to practice those before I make that decision…though I did just pick up a nice Japanese saw or two at Wood craft to cut dovetails…hmmm.

I will be milling up the stock in the next couple of days and I will post pictures as I go as I think I am about at the place where I can actually blog about my work. It also helps that I have all this free time, at least until the beginning of the school year.
 

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VT's Poker Case

Here is my next project. I have been following Bob Babcock and company's blog "Design. Click. Build." on how to use Sketchup over at www.finewoodworking.com . I love working in Sketchup and this seemed like a good piece of software (since it was free and is relatively easy to learn) to design a case for my poker chips.

My buds and wife and I have been playing poker on a semi-regular basis, and for whatever reason, it seems like we bought the chips. We got them on sale and they are in those spinning octagons.

Chip Spindles

Those are fine if they stay on a shelf and only get brought out at home. The problem is that we end up going over to the other players' houses for the most part so that no one has to host the game all the time. This leads to us bringing the two spindles over in their cardboard boxes and the chips inevitably fall all over the place and that just drives me nuts. So, I says to myself, "Self, you need to make some cool looking box to hold the chips. This is a perfect opportunity to build your skills in wood and on your computer." I spent a long time designing the case after looking all over the place for examples (there are very few of those out there, by the way). Part of the length of time had to do with how busy I was at the end of the school year (I am a High school teacher by day, and the student government advisor to boot so the end of the school year is my busiest time of year and I had very little time in the shop in April and May). I was also delayed in the building of this by a month long vacation to Europe with my wife. We hit 6 countries and had a blast. If you want to read our travel journal (my wife did all the work on this, she loves the Yahoo travel), just click on the link below

http://travel.yahoo.com/trip-view-1085877-europe_adventure;_ylt=AtnsNYud_Q6_g053B26K9_KfItAF

If that doesn't work, just go to the travel section of Yahoo.com and search for Team VT, that's us.

Well, now that I have cleaned up the sketchup file and put dimensions on it for my own use, I thought I would actually start a blog on building this poker chip case. The textures in the picture are just approximations of what I wanted it to look like. I have a chunk of 8/4 maple that I plan on resawing into the sides, but I hadn't actually bought the wood for the contrasting color until just recently. I found some nice Padauk with a good reddish color to use for the contrasting color. The colors of the school that I work at are Red and White and since most of the people who play poker with us are teachers at my school, I thought it would be appropriate to try to get something close.

Case Poker Chips Open

Case Poker Chips closed

I didn't feel up to actually drawing in the hardware and handle yet, but I intend to pick something up when I get to that point. I have also been toying with hand chopping dovetails instead of the finger joints that I had originally intended. We shall see, I need to practice those before I make that decision…though I did just pick up a nice Japanese saw or two at Wood craft to cut dovetails…hmmm.

I will be milling up the stock in the next couple of days and I will post pictures as I go as I think I am about at the place where I can actually blog about my work. It also helps that I have all this free time, at least until the beginning of the school year.
Great Start.
 

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VT's Poker Case

Here is my next project. I have been following Bob Babcock and company's blog "Design. Click. Build." on how to use Sketchup over at www.finewoodworking.com . I love working in Sketchup and this seemed like a good piece of software (since it was free and is relatively easy to learn) to design a case for my poker chips.

My buds and wife and I have been playing poker on a semi-regular basis, and for whatever reason, it seems like we bought the chips. We got them on sale and they are in those spinning octagons.

Chip Spindles

Those are fine if they stay on a shelf and only get brought out at home. The problem is that we end up going over to the other players' houses for the most part so that no one has to host the game all the time. This leads to us bringing the two spindles over in their cardboard boxes and the chips inevitably fall all over the place and that just drives me nuts. So, I says to myself, "Self, you need to make some cool looking box to hold the chips. This is a perfect opportunity to build your skills in wood and on your computer." I spent a long time designing the case after looking all over the place for examples (there are very few of those out there, by the way). Part of the length of time had to do with how busy I was at the end of the school year (I am a High school teacher by day, and the student government advisor to boot so the end of the school year is my busiest time of year and I had very little time in the shop in April and May). I was also delayed in the building of this by a month long vacation to Europe with my wife. We hit 6 countries and had a blast. If you want to read our travel journal (my wife did all the work on this, she loves the Yahoo travel), just click on the link below

http://travel.yahoo.com/trip-view-1085877-europe_adventure;_ylt=AtnsNYud_Q6_g053B26K9_KfItAF

If that doesn't work, just go to the travel section of Yahoo.com and search for Team VT, that's us.

Well, now that I have cleaned up the sketchup file and put dimensions on it for my own use, I thought I would actually start a blog on building this poker chip case. The textures in the picture are just approximations of what I wanted it to look like. I have a chunk of 8/4 maple that I plan on resawing into the sides, but I hadn't actually bought the wood for the contrasting color until just recently. I found some nice Padauk with a good reddish color to use for the contrasting color. The colors of the school that I work at are Red and White and since most of the people who play poker with us are teachers at my school, I thought it would be appropriate to try to get something close.

Case Poker Chips Open

Case Poker Chips closed

I didn't feel up to actually drawing in the hardware and handle yet, but I intend to pick something up when I get to that point. I have also been toying with hand chopping dovetails instead of the finger joints that I had originally intended. We shall see, I need to practice those before I make that decision…though I did just pick up a nice Japanese saw or two at Wood craft to cut dovetails…hmmm.

I will be milling up the stock in the next couple of days and I will post pictures as I go as I think I am about at the place where I can actually blog about my work. It also helps that I have all this free time, at least until the beginning of the school year.
VT,

Here is a link to a poker chip caddy that as posted on The Wood Whisperer's site. It might not address your transportability issues directly, but they are so cool looking I thought you might want a look before you started milling up your lumber
 

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VT's Poker Case

Here is my next project. I have been following Bob Babcock and company's blog "Design. Click. Build." on how to use Sketchup over at www.finewoodworking.com . I love working in Sketchup and this seemed like a good piece of software (since it was free and is relatively easy to learn) to design a case for my poker chips.

My buds and wife and I have been playing poker on a semi-regular basis, and for whatever reason, it seems like we bought the chips. We got them on sale and they are in those spinning octagons.

Chip Spindles

Those are fine if they stay on a shelf and only get brought out at home. The problem is that we end up going over to the other players' houses for the most part so that no one has to host the game all the time. This leads to us bringing the two spindles over in their cardboard boxes and the chips inevitably fall all over the place and that just drives me nuts. So, I says to myself, "Self, you need to make some cool looking box to hold the chips. This is a perfect opportunity to build your skills in wood and on your computer." I spent a long time designing the case after looking all over the place for examples (there are very few of those out there, by the way). Part of the length of time had to do with how busy I was at the end of the school year (I am a High school teacher by day, and the student government advisor to boot so the end of the school year is my busiest time of year and I had very little time in the shop in April and May). I was also delayed in the building of this by a month long vacation to Europe with my wife. We hit 6 countries and had a blast. If you want to read our travel journal (my wife did all the work on this, she loves the Yahoo travel), just click on the link below

http://travel.yahoo.com/trip-view-1085877-europe_adventure;_ylt=AtnsNYud_Q6_g053B26K9_KfItAF

If that doesn't work, just go to the travel section of Yahoo.com and search for Team VT, that's us.

Well, now that I have cleaned up the sketchup file and put dimensions on it for my own use, I thought I would actually start a blog on building this poker chip case. The textures in the picture are just approximations of what I wanted it to look like. I have a chunk of 8/4 maple that I plan on resawing into the sides, but I hadn't actually bought the wood for the contrasting color until just recently. I found some nice Padauk with a good reddish color to use for the contrasting color. The colors of the school that I work at are Red and White and since most of the people who play poker with us are teachers at my school, I thought it would be appropriate to try to get something close.

Case Poker Chips Open

Case Poker Chips closed

I didn't feel up to actually drawing in the hardware and handle yet, but I intend to pick something up when I get to that point. I have also been toying with hand chopping dovetails instead of the finger joints that I had originally intended. We shall see, I need to practice those before I make that decision…though I did just pick up a nice Japanese saw or two at Wood craft to cut dovetails…hmmm.

I will be milling up the stock in the next couple of days and I will post pictures as I go as I think I am about at the place where I can actually blog about my work. It also helps that I have all this free time, at least until the beginning of the school year.
Nice looking project….I need to make one of these…I hate the chip caddy I have. Thanks for the comment BTW. I just started a blog here on Sketchup. Let me know if you have anything you'ld like a tutorial on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Day 2

I had seen the Wood Whisperer's poker chip trays, and I like them, but they weren't exactly what I wanted, though he did give me a great idea on how to make the trays that were going to hold the chips in my case, but more on that later.

Yesterday I spent the day making sawdust out of some nice looking Padauk and Maple. Here is the 8/4 board of Padauk as it sits on my jointer and some of the bright bright orange chips that came out of it.

Jointing Padauk

Here is the beautiful looking wood after it has been jointed a little. I must say I am really happy with the grain and the color, though I think I will be staining it to get a more reddish color, but I haven't totally made up my mind on that.

Padauk Grain

Padauk Grain 2

I was following the dimensions from my sketchup drawing, and I mindlessly milled all of my stock down to rough and then final dimensions. I had also glued up the bottom and the top so that I could plane them down to final thickness and cut them to their final dimensions

Chip Case Gluing up top and bottom

By the time I was done, I had come to the conclusion that I had made a mistake in my initial drawing. I had originally intended the front/back and sides of the case to be 3/8" thick, and when I got out to the shop and made my maple that thick, I realized that it just wouldn't do for what I wanted. This basically made me go to bed a little bit unhappy with myself. I didn't really want to go spend any significant amount of money on some more maple, but I just didn't think that the 3/" size of the front would work on an almost 21" box. As I was drifting off to sleep, I remembered that I had recently made a purchase of a couple board feet of curly maple that was just shy of 4/4 thick. I thought I just might have enough of that to make the four pieces that I needed, and that definitely allowed me to sleep a little easier.

Unfortunately, I just didn't have enough for all four pieces. I milled up two of them with the intention of making a trip to my Woodcraft store this morning after it opened to pick up some more. Lo and behold, they had enough for me to make my last two pieces and have some left over. I wish that I hadn't had to spend the money, but I think the look will be better with the curly maple and a 1/2" thickness. Now I have all the pieces milled to their correct final size and I can get started on the other work. I had to go run some errands, so I put off the cutting for a bit.

Chip Case Stock Milled up

When I returned home, I started work on the trays to hold the chips. Here is where the Wood Whisperer comes in. His idea of clamping the two trays together and using a forstner bit to the diameter of the chips was very useful. Of course, my chips are 1 9/16" in diameter and anyone who knows hole saws and forstner bits, or at least their normal sizes knows that most stores don't stock this particular size, but I was in luck, Woodcraft had the exact size I needed and it was actually in stock at the store.

Here is the first blank clamped up and the story stick of dimensions on it waiting for me to start drilling.

Chip Trays and storyboard before drilling

Here is me starting drilling the first hole:

Chip Tray Drilling Hole

Here is the first hole finished:

Chip Tray 1st Hole Drilled

Which by the way wasn't as easy as I had expected. My drill press only has somewhere around a 2" quill distance, and of course the blanks are 3 1/2" thick which makes each hole a little bit of a pain, but overall it came out just peachy as you can see by this picture of some poker chips stacked in the hole.

Chip Tray Perfect Fit

Success! Now for 7 more holes. I am writing this in between holes as the Wood Whisperer wisely suggested letting the bit cool down between the drilling of each hole. I don't know how much more of the cutting I will do tonight, but I will be sure to take more pictures and post tomorrow.
 

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Day 2

I had seen the Wood Whisperer's poker chip trays, and I like them, but they weren't exactly what I wanted, though he did give me a great idea on how to make the trays that were going to hold the chips in my case, but more on that later.

Yesterday I spent the day making sawdust out of some nice looking Padauk and Maple. Here is the 8/4 board of Padauk as it sits on my jointer and some of the bright bright orange chips that came out of it.

Jointing Padauk

Here is the beautiful looking wood after it has been jointed a little. I must say I am really happy with the grain and the color, though I think I will be staining it to get a more reddish color, but I haven't totally made up my mind on that.

Padauk Grain

Padauk Grain 2

I was following the dimensions from my sketchup drawing, and I mindlessly milled all of my stock down to rough and then final dimensions. I had also glued up the bottom and the top so that I could plane them down to final thickness and cut them to their final dimensions

Chip Case Gluing up top and bottom

By the time I was done, I had come to the conclusion that I had made a mistake in my initial drawing. I had originally intended the front/back and sides of the case to be 3/8" thick, and when I got out to the shop and made my maple that thick, I realized that it just wouldn't do for what I wanted. This basically made me go to bed a little bit unhappy with myself. I didn't really want to go spend any significant amount of money on some more maple, but I just didn't think that the 3/" size of the front would work on an almost 21" box. As I was drifting off to sleep, I remembered that I had recently made a purchase of a couple board feet of curly maple that was just shy of 4/4 thick. I thought I just might have enough of that to make the four pieces that I needed, and that definitely allowed me to sleep a little easier.

Unfortunately, I just didn't have enough for all four pieces. I milled up two of them with the intention of making a trip to my Woodcraft store this morning after it opened to pick up some more. Lo and behold, they had enough for me to make my last two pieces and have some left over. I wish that I hadn't had to spend the money, but I think the look will be better with the curly maple and a 1/2" thickness. Now I have all the pieces milled to their correct final size and I can get started on the other work. I had to go run some errands, so I put off the cutting for a bit.

Chip Case Stock Milled up

When I returned home, I started work on the trays to hold the chips. Here is where the Wood Whisperer comes in. His idea of clamping the two trays together and using a forstner bit to the diameter of the chips was very useful. Of course, my chips are 1 9/16" in diameter and anyone who knows hole saws and forstner bits, or at least their normal sizes knows that most stores don't stock this particular size, but I was in luck, Woodcraft had the exact size I needed and it was actually in stock at the store.

Here is the first blank clamped up and the story stick of dimensions on it waiting for me to start drilling.

Chip Trays and storyboard before drilling

Here is me starting drilling the first hole:

Chip Tray Drilling Hole

Here is the first hole finished:

Chip Tray 1st Hole Drilled

Which by the way wasn't as easy as I had expected. My drill press only has somewhere around a 2" quill distance, and of course the blanks are 3 1/2" thick which makes each hole a little bit of a pain, but overall it came out just peachy as you can see by this picture of some poker chips stacked in the hole.

Chip Tray Perfect Fit

Success! Now for 7 more holes. I am writing this in between holes as the Wood Whisperer wisely suggested letting the bit cool down between the drilling of each hole. I don't know how much more of the cutting I will do tonight, but I will be sure to take more pictures and post tomorrow.
Looking forward to the finished box.
Love the smell of padauk
 

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Day 2

I had seen the Wood Whisperer's poker chip trays, and I like them, but they weren't exactly what I wanted, though he did give me a great idea on how to make the trays that were going to hold the chips in my case, but more on that later.

Yesterday I spent the day making sawdust out of some nice looking Padauk and Maple. Here is the 8/4 board of Padauk as it sits on my jointer and some of the bright bright orange chips that came out of it.

Jointing Padauk

Here is the beautiful looking wood after it has been jointed a little. I must say I am really happy with the grain and the color, though I think I will be staining it to get a more reddish color, but I haven't totally made up my mind on that.

Padauk Grain

Padauk Grain 2

I was following the dimensions from my sketchup drawing, and I mindlessly milled all of my stock down to rough and then final dimensions. I had also glued up the bottom and the top so that I could plane them down to final thickness and cut them to their final dimensions

Chip Case Gluing up top and bottom

By the time I was done, I had come to the conclusion that I had made a mistake in my initial drawing. I had originally intended the front/back and sides of the case to be 3/8" thick, and when I got out to the shop and made my maple that thick, I realized that it just wouldn't do for what I wanted. This basically made me go to bed a little bit unhappy with myself. I didn't really want to go spend any significant amount of money on some more maple, but I just didn't think that the 3/" size of the front would work on an almost 21" box. As I was drifting off to sleep, I remembered that I had recently made a purchase of a couple board feet of curly maple that was just shy of 4/4 thick. I thought I just might have enough of that to make the four pieces that I needed, and that definitely allowed me to sleep a little easier.

Unfortunately, I just didn't have enough for all four pieces. I milled up two of them with the intention of making a trip to my Woodcraft store this morning after it opened to pick up some more. Lo and behold, they had enough for me to make my last two pieces and have some left over. I wish that I hadn't had to spend the money, but I think the look will be better with the curly maple and a 1/2" thickness. Now I have all the pieces milled to their correct final size and I can get started on the other work. I had to go run some errands, so I put off the cutting for a bit.

Chip Case Stock Milled up

When I returned home, I started work on the trays to hold the chips. Here is where the Wood Whisperer comes in. His idea of clamping the two trays together and using a forstner bit to the diameter of the chips was very useful. Of course, my chips are 1 9/16" in diameter and anyone who knows hole saws and forstner bits, or at least their normal sizes knows that most stores don't stock this particular size, but I was in luck, Woodcraft had the exact size I needed and it was actually in stock at the store.

Here is the first blank clamped up and the story stick of dimensions on it waiting for me to start drilling.

Chip Trays and storyboard before drilling

Here is me starting drilling the first hole:

Chip Tray Drilling Hole

Here is the first hole finished:

Chip Tray 1st Hole Drilled

Which by the way wasn't as easy as I had expected. My drill press only has somewhere around a 2" quill distance, and of course the blanks are 3 1/2" thick which makes each hole a little bit of a pain, but overall it came out just peachy as you can see by this picture of some poker chips stacked in the hole.

Chip Tray Perfect Fit

Success! Now for 7 more holes. I am writing this in between holes as the Wood Whisperer wisely suggested letting the bit cool down between the drilling of each hole. I don't know how much more of the cutting I will do tonight, but I will be sure to take more pictures and post tomorrow.
VT-
Are you aware that the padauk will oxidize to a much darker brownish orange with exposure to UV light? I wish it would stay bright orange (just as I wish purpleheart would stay bright purple), but even treating it with UV inhibitors will not keep this from happening over time. Just thought I would throw in my two cents before you stain your new piece. Like Sawdust2, I look forward to your progress, as I have those on my long list of things to make too.

BTW, really nice drill press table.
 
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