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Discussion Starter · #121 ·
Sharpening past the DMT.

I decided to see if I could improve on my dmt sharpness. The good news, I did. The bad news, I did. It's not a tremendous amount, and not enough to make me go back to waterstones (yet), but I will leave my hard arkansas on the bench from now on.

This is my normal sharpening routine.
1. Hollow grind
2. Hit the edge (do it more and more by hand) on th 3 micron DMT
3. Strop the back
4. Hit the 3 micron DMT again.

So here is with just the 3 micron dmt. Back flatten to the DMT well

EDIT: This first picture is what I started with. It hasn't been flatten yet (at least not by me)
Wood Tool Rectangle Hand tool Wood stain


Brown Handwriting Wood Rectangle Font


Food Helmet Eggplant Ingredient Wood


Polishing the back on the felt wheel with green compound and sharpening with the hard arkansas stone ( I saw a slight difference from the dmt to the arkansas)
Plane Wood Metal Automotive exterior Hardwood


Same sequence….
Wood Hand tool Gas Metal Hardwood


Wood Handwriting Natural material Cuisine Ingredient


I did this with 4 different hand planes. The 2 shown, the Stanley #18, The sargent 710, and a Bedrock 604 and a Stanley 60 1/2.

All showed a subtle difference. The biggest difference was with the polishing of the back. Sharpening the bevel was barley distinguishable but I could see a slight difference in the resistance.

If, from the dmt, you polished the back with the felt, then sharpened with the dmt, the difference would be almost unnoticeable from sharpening with the arkansas. I'd have to do it a few more times to really know for sure, but my gut tells me the arkasas would have a slight edge.
It does make sense Mike, and to further support your theory, I've restore quit a few that had never been sharpened.

But then there is the flip side. The plane where the blade is well worn and been sharpened many many times, and never flatten on the back. A normal person would have given up if the plane didn't do what it was suppose to.

But then, I spent many years using hand planes, sharpening on a belt sander, thinking that was good. All it meant was everything was sanded after.
 

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Sharpening past the DMT.

I decided to see if I could improve on my dmt sharpness. The good news, I did. The bad news, I did. It's not a tremendous amount, and not enough to make me go back to waterstones (yet), but I will leave my hard arkansas on the bench from now on.

This is my normal sharpening routine.
1. Hollow grind
2. Hit the edge (do it more and more by hand) on th 3 micron DMT
3. Strop the back
4. Hit the 3 micron DMT again.

So here is with just the 3 micron dmt. Back flatten to the DMT well

EDIT: This first picture is what I started with. It hasn't been flatten yet (at least not by me)
Wood Tool Rectangle Hand tool Wood stain


Brown Handwriting Wood Rectangle Font


Food Helmet Eggplant Ingredient Wood


Polishing the back on the felt wheel with green compound and sharpening with the hard arkansas stone ( I saw a slight difference from the dmt to the arkansas)
Plane Wood Metal Automotive exterior Hardwood


Same sequence….
Wood Hand tool Gas Metal Hardwood


Wood Handwriting Natural material Cuisine Ingredient


I did this with 4 different hand planes. The 2 shown, the Stanley #18, The sargent 710, and a Bedrock 604 and a Stanley 60 1/2.

All showed a subtle difference. The biggest difference was with the polishing of the back. Sharpening the bevel was barley distinguishable but I could see a slight difference in the resistance.

If, from the dmt, you polished the back with the felt, then sharpened with the dmt, the difference would be almost unnoticeable from sharpening with the arkansas. I'd have to do it a few more times to really know for sure, but my gut tells me the arkasas would have a slight edge.
From the tools I have of Grand and Great Grand Dads before me, it seems the family mantra was, If it cuts wood, it's good. But of course, those gents were generalists rather than jointers or furniture makers when it came to hand tools.

Point being, not everyone knew everything about sharpening 75 years ago, simply by virtue of living back then.

Wish I had an old plane of the family's. Bet the back wouldn't show signs of being worked…

Thanks, Don, for sharing what you find along the way towards a better edge. Your approaches are reasonable and attainaible.
 

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In Loving Memory
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8,391 Posts
Sharpening past the DMT.

I decided to see if I could improve on my dmt sharpness. The good news, I did. The bad news, I did. It's not a tremendous amount, and not enough to make me go back to waterstones (yet), but I will leave my hard arkansas on the bench from now on.

This is my normal sharpening routine.
1. Hollow grind
2. Hit the edge (do it more and more by hand) on th 3 micron DMT
3. Strop the back
4. Hit the 3 micron DMT again.

So here is with just the 3 micron dmt. Back flatten to the DMT well

EDIT: This first picture is what I started with. It hasn't been flatten yet (at least not by me)
Wood Tool Rectangle Hand tool Wood stain


Brown Handwriting Wood Rectangle Font


Food Helmet Eggplant Ingredient Wood


Polishing the back on the felt wheel with green compound and sharpening with the hard arkansas stone ( I saw a slight difference from the dmt to the arkansas)
Plane Wood Metal Automotive exterior Hardwood


Same sequence….
Wood Hand tool Gas Metal Hardwood


Wood Handwriting Natural material Cuisine Ingredient


I did this with 4 different hand planes. The 2 shown, the Stanley #18, The sargent 710, and a Bedrock 604 and a Stanley 60 1/2.

All showed a subtle difference. The biggest difference was with the polishing of the back. Sharpening the bevel was barley distinguishable but I could see a slight difference in the resistance.

If, from the dmt, you polished the back with the felt, then sharpened with the dmt, the difference would be almost unnoticeable from sharpening with the arkansas. I'd have to do it a few more times to really know for sure, but my gut tells me the arkasas would have a slight edge.
I bought a nice Stanley no. 5 around 1981 and used it occasionally until 1996 when I became interested in woodworking as a hobby, and probably a few years after that, I finally learned to sharpen properly (slow learner I guess). There wasn't an awful lot of info out there when I began and unfortunately I was focused mostly on power tools at the time, but my Stanley was (somewhat) usable though far from sweet. I must admit that I didn't really know what sharp was, except for the knife I kept well honed and used a lot while I was in the Navy. I sharpened all my lath tools except for the skew chisel on the bench grinder and still do as they cut just fine that way.

I was at my local woodworkers store where I bought my first bandsaw, combo machine and other power tools one day and I saw a whole box full of Stanley and maybe some other brands of well used no. 4 smoothers. I asked if they were for sale and they told me they had been sent from school wood shop for sharpening. I was amazed that students weren't taught to sharpen their tools since any wood working depended on it. It looked to me that the store had just given them a fresh bevel with a bench grinder and not even honed at all! A case of putting the cart in front of the horse if you ask me.
 

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Sharpening past the DMT.

I decided to see if I could improve on my dmt sharpness. The good news, I did. The bad news, I did. It's not a tremendous amount, and not enough to make me go back to waterstones (yet), but I will leave my hard arkansas on the bench from now on.

This is my normal sharpening routine.
1. Hollow grind
2. Hit the edge (do it more and more by hand) on th 3 micron DMT
3. Strop the back
4. Hit the 3 micron DMT again.

So here is with just the 3 micron dmt. Back flatten to the DMT well

EDIT: This first picture is what I started with. It hasn't been flatten yet (at least not by me)
Wood Tool Rectangle Hand tool Wood stain


Brown Handwriting Wood Rectangle Font


Food Helmet Eggplant Ingredient Wood


Polishing the back on the felt wheel with green compound and sharpening with the hard arkansas stone ( I saw a slight difference from the dmt to the arkansas)
Plane Wood Metal Automotive exterior Hardwood


Same sequence….
Wood Hand tool Gas Metal Hardwood


Wood Handwriting Natural material Cuisine Ingredient


I did this with 4 different hand planes. The 2 shown, the Stanley #18, The sargent 710, and a Bedrock 604 and a Stanley 60 1/2.

All showed a subtle difference. The biggest difference was with the polishing of the back. Sharpening the bevel was barley distinguishable but I could see a slight difference in the resistance.

If, from the dmt, you polished the back with the felt, then sharpened with the dmt, the difference would be almost unnoticeable from sharpening with the arkansas. I'd have to do it a few more times to really know for sure, but my gut tells me the arkasas would have a slight edge.
I always get facinated by these compares, it seem that we have many options that acually work, and so it is mostely to make a choice of what we like and what we can get friendly with.
Thank you for the efford.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

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Sharpening past the DMT.

I decided to see if I could improve on my dmt sharpness. The good news, I did. The bad news, I did. It's not a tremendous amount, and not enough to make me go back to waterstones (yet), but I will leave my hard arkansas on the bench from now on.

This is my normal sharpening routine.
1. Hollow grind
2. Hit the edge (do it more and more by hand) on th 3 micron DMT
3. Strop the back
4. Hit the 3 micron DMT again.

So here is with just the 3 micron dmt. Back flatten to the DMT well

EDIT: This first picture is what I started with. It hasn't been flatten yet (at least not by me)
Wood Tool Rectangle Hand tool Wood stain


Brown Handwriting Wood Rectangle Font


Food Helmet Eggplant Ingredient Wood


Polishing the back on the felt wheel with green compound and sharpening with the hard arkansas stone ( I saw a slight difference from the dmt to the arkansas)
Plane Wood Metal Automotive exterior Hardwood


Same sequence….
Wood Hand tool Gas Metal Hardwood


Wood Handwriting Natural material Cuisine Ingredient


I did this with 4 different hand planes. The 2 shown, the Stanley #18, The sargent 710, and a Bedrock 604 and a Stanley 60 1/2.

All showed a subtle difference. The biggest difference was with the polishing of the back. Sharpening the bevel was barley distinguishable but I could see a slight difference in the resistance.

If, from the dmt, you polished the back with the felt, then sharpened with the dmt, the difference would be almost unnoticeable from sharpening with the arkansas. I'd have to do it a few more times to really know for sure, but my gut tells me the arkasas would have a slight edge.
great post Don, thanks for putting it together. Any thought of trying the same test on end grain?
 

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Discussion Starter · #126 ·
Sharpening past the DMT.

I decided to see if I could improve on my dmt sharpness. The good news, I did. The bad news, I did. It's not a tremendous amount, and not enough to make me go back to waterstones (yet), but I will leave my hard arkansas on the bench from now on.

This is my normal sharpening routine.
1. Hollow grind
2. Hit the edge (do it more and more by hand) on th 3 micron DMT
3. Strop the back
4. Hit the 3 micron DMT again.

So here is with just the 3 micron dmt. Back flatten to the DMT well

EDIT: This first picture is what I started with. It hasn't been flatten yet (at least not by me)
Wood Tool Rectangle Hand tool Wood stain


Brown Handwriting Wood Rectangle Font


Food Helmet Eggplant Ingredient Wood


Polishing the back on the felt wheel with green compound and sharpening with the hard arkansas stone ( I saw a slight difference from the dmt to the arkansas)
Plane Wood Metal Automotive exterior Hardwood


Same sequence….
Wood Hand tool Gas Metal Hardwood


Wood Handwriting Natural material Cuisine Ingredient


I did this with 4 different hand planes. The 2 shown, the Stanley #18, The sargent 710, and a Bedrock 604 and a Stanley 60 1/2.

All showed a subtle difference. The biggest difference was with the polishing of the back. Sharpening the bevel was barley distinguishable but I could see a slight difference in the resistance.

If, from the dmt, you polished the back with the felt, then sharpened with the dmt, the difference would be almost unnoticeable from sharpening with the arkansas. I'd have to do it a few more times to really know for sure, but my gut tells me the arkasas would have a slight edge.
Mauricio, that's a good idea. I'll add it to my to-do list.
 

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Sharpening past the DMT.

I decided to see if I could improve on my dmt sharpness. The good news, I did. The bad news, I did. It's not a tremendous amount, and not enough to make me go back to waterstones (yet), but I will leave my hard arkansas on the bench from now on.

This is my normal sharpening routine.
1. Hollow grind
2. Hit the edge (do it more and more by hand) on th 3 micron DMT
3. Strop the back
4. Hit the 3 micron DMT again.

So here is with just the 3 micron dmt. Back flatten to the DMT well

EDIT: This first picture is what I started with. It hasn't been flatten yet (at least not by me)
Wood Tool Rectangle Hand tool Wood stain


Brown Handwriting Wood Rectangle Font


Food Helmet Eggplant Ingredient Wood


Polishing the back on the felt wheel with green compound and sharpening with the hard arkansas stone ( I saw a slight difference from the dmt to the arkansas)
Plane Wood Metal Automotive exterior Hardwood


Same sequence….
Wood Hand tool Gas Metal Hardwood


Wood Handwriting Natural material Cuisine Ingredient


I did this with 4 different hand planes. The 2 shown, the Stanley #18, The sargent 710, and a Bedrock 604 and a Stanley 60 1/2.

All showed a subtle difference. The biggest difference was with the polishing of the back. Sharpening the bevel was barley distinguishable but I could see a slight difference in the resistance.

If, from the dmt, you polished the back with the felt, then sharpened with the dmt, the difference would be almost unnoticeable from sharpening with the arkansas. I'd have to do it a few more times to really know for sure, but my gut tells me the arkasas would have a slight edge.
Interesting Thread. I use my 8k DMT for pllane irons, but use a black arkie rock for carving knives.
During a carving project, I strop the knife or gouge often during use. Hit the edge a few licks every 3-5 minutes.
Edges seem to last longer between actual honing.

Have even experimented with stropping smoother irons. Seems to help some especially on gnarly wood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #128 ·
Tuning it up Bench plane style

I brought this magnificent (note the dripping sarcasm) piece of machinery home with me during one of my flea market outings. This is a late model Stanley #4. Its painted Blue, made in the US, has a painted cap, a shorter iron than vintage, and no toe on the tote. The knob and tote is painted black, it has an aluminum frog and a pretty cheezy lateral adjuster.

Now….why anyone but someone with a sickness for hand planes like me would buy this plane is a little beyond my understanding, unless it was given to you or almost given to you. A note, I'd rather have one of these than any handyman though, and I'd put them in a pretty close running with a Defiance line hand plane. Again, the Defiance can be made to work well pretty consistently, but it takes a little more love than a Stanley Bailey vintage or equivalent.

For clean up see http://lumberjocks.com/replies/612946

So the following is some advice on how to make almost any plane work well. I'll try to separate out my experience in the differences between these and vintage plane.

Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Jack plane


Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Shoe


If your plane needs a full restoration, as in stripping, painting, and parts replaced, go to either my restoration blog , Making a tote blog, turning a knob blog, or a list of possible places to find parts.

Sharpen it
So here is what you do. First sharpen it. See parts 7 and 10 It doesn't matter what your taste in sharpening is as long as it works for you. It MUST be sharp.

Polish the end of the cap iron
Polish the end of the cap iron This is more important than many people think. It helps with the breaking of the chip.

Check and fix the cap iron if needed. The cap iron must have good contatact with the iron. Any gap at all will collect chips, and clog. Make sure its clean and tight. It should be re-rusted by now with whatever you decided (if it needed it), or you can just wire brush it. I go into more detail here.

Flatten the frog. File the frog flat. I lock it in a vise and hold the file flat while filing it. It doesn't need to be perfect. Some like to polish this as well, but its not really necessary.

Hand Wood Finger Bumper Thumb




here is the aluminum frog flattened. The aluminum actually took a lot to flatten, but flatten quickly because …... well,.......its aluminum. I'm also not thrilled with the amount of contact area on the Blue frog, but in the end, it did work reasonably well.

Musical instrument Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory String instrument accessory Wood


Check the frog seating
Also check the frog seating. I very seldom have to do this on a vintage plane, but once in a while one does not seat properly. You can use valve grinding compound and usually it doesn't take much. In my latest restore I used a block of wood and sand paper.

Automotive lighting Sleeve Purple Motor vehicle Denim


Water Wood Paint Grey Rectangle


The best way to tell if it needs seating is as your tightening the screws, or just force the frog down on the seat. You should feel no rocking. You can also use some machinist blue to ensure you're getting good contact with the two parts.

Next flatten the sole. Use a piece of granite or a table saw top. If it proves to be real bad, I'll start it on the belt sander, like I do the sides, but I always finish it on the flatter surface of the table saw. Turn the plane front and push in all directions to keep it flat and even.

For longer planes, use sand paper from a role or cut a belt for the task.

Note, I've found the older the plane, the less flattening it'll need. You'd think just the opposite would be true with advancements in manufacturing, but anything made after the 60's usually makes it to the belt sander. The Blue stanley took longer than most I've ever done.

Vehicle door Gas Automotive lighting Gadget Bumper


Purple Wood Audio equipment Flooring Gas


Wood Automotive lighting Flooring Rectangle Floor


As I'm putting everything together I give it a coat of Fluid Film to keep the rust away.
Plane Block plane Wood Tin can Rebate plane


Or Wax it
Brown Wood Hardwood Metal Circle


The knob and Tote

You will decide how much the knob and tote needs but here are a few tricks to help.

I chuck the knob in the drill press.

Wood Floor Flooring Lamp Gas


Grind the head so it fits in the hole (were possible). Put a washer on the bottom of the knob.



I use a bolt with a 1/4" Philips head that's been ground down slightly so it fits inside the knob where the brass nut goes. Tighten it down with a washer and chuck it in the drill press. Only chuck it hand tight so you don't trash the threads.



Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Gas


Sand it with 60 grit if it still has a varnish or hard finish. then up through 500 (or more if desired) grit. If it had an oil finish I'll start with 220 grit. First few coats of BLO goes on with steel wool while in the drill press. If the existing finish is hard, it is usually easier to scrape it first.

This also helps with waxing. You can spin it fast enough in a drill press to heat the wax.

For the tote, I haven't found an easier way than possibly scraping if its a hard finish, and sanding as you would any other piece of wood.

Finish the wood with boiled linseed oil (BLO). If its a really dry old piece, soak it in the BLO overnight.

Troubleshooting.

If the mouth is to wide, its pretty hard to fix. You can slide the frog ahead just so far. If its still to wide, you have a couple of options.
1. Turn the plane into a jack
2. Buy a thicker iron.
3. Make it a paper weight.

I've test with shimming and haven't had a whole lot of luck.

Chatter
1. make sure its sharp
2. make sure your not taking to big of a bite. Thin down the shavings.
3. check the frog for both flatness, make sure the screws are tight, and make sure its seating well.
4. Don't go buy a thicker iron thinking it will fix it.

Then enjoy the results
Plane Smoothing plane Shoulder plane Hand tool Wood


I hope it helps and thanks for stopping by.

dw
 

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Tuning it up Bench plane style

I brought this magnificent (note the dripping sarcasm) piece of machinery home with me during one of my flea market outings. This is a late model Stanley #4. Its painted Blue, made in the US, has a painted cap, a shorter iron than vintage, and no toe on the tote. The knob and tote is painted black, it has an aluminum frog and a pretty cheezy lateral adjuster.

Now….why anyone but someone with a sickness for hand planes like me would buy this plane is a little beyond my understanding, unless it was given to you or almost given to you. A note, I'd rather have one of these than any handyman though, and I'd put them in a pretty close running with a Defiance line hand plane. Again, the Defiance can be made to work well pretty consistently, but it takes a little more love than a Stanley Bailey vintage or equivalent.

For clean up see http://lumberjocks.com/replies/612946

So the following is some advice on how to make almost any plane work well. I'll try to separate out my experience in the differences between these and vintage plane.

Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Jack plane


Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Shoe


If your plane needs a full restoration, as in stripping, painting, and parts replaced, go to either my restoration blog , Making a tote blog, turning a knob blog, or a list of possible places to find parts.

Sharpen it
So here is what you do. First sharpen it. See parts 7 and 10 It doesn't matter what your taste in sharpening is as long as it works for you. It MUST be sharp.

Polish the end of the cap iron
Polish the end of the cap iron This is more important than many people think. It helps with the breaking of the chip.

Check and fix the cap iron if needed. The cap iron must have good contatact with the iron. Any gap at all will collect chips, and clog. Make sure its clean and tight. It should be re-rusted by now with whatever you decided (if it needed it), or you can just wire brush it. I go into more detail here.

Flatten the frog. File the frog flat. I lock it in a vise and hold the file flat while filing it. It doesn't need to be perfect. Some like to polish this as well, but its not really necessary.

Hand Wood Finger Bumper Thumb




here is the aluminum frog flattened. The aluminum actually took a lot to flatten, but flatten quickly because …... well,.......its aluminum. I'm also not thrilled with the amount of contact area on the Blue frog, but in the end, it did work reasonably well.

Musical instrument Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory String instrument accessory Wood


Check the frog seating
Also check the frog seating. I very seldom have to do this on a vintage plane, but once in a while one does not seat properly. You can use valve grinding compound and usually it doesn't take much. In my latest restore I used a block of wood and sand paper.

Automotive lighting Sleeve Purple Motor vehicle Denim


Water Wood Paint Grey Rectangle


The best way to tell if it needs seating is as your tightening the screws, or just force the frog down on the seat. You should feel no rocking. You can also use some machinist blue to ensure you're getting good contact with the two parts.

Next flatten the sole. Use a piece of granite or a table saw top. If it proves to be real bad, I'll start it on the belt sander, like I do the sides, but I always finish it on the flatter surface of the table saw. Turn the plane front and push in all directions to keep it flat and even.

For longer planes, use sand paper from a role or cut a belt for the task.

Note, I've found the older the plane, the less flattening it'll need. You'd think just the opposite would be true with advancements in manufacturing, but anything made after the 60's usually makes it to the belt sander. The Blue stanley took longer than most I've ever done.

Vehicle door Gas Automotive lighting Gadget Bumper


Purple Wood Audio equipment Flooring Gas


Wood Automotive lighting Flooring Rectangle Floor


As I'm putting everything together I give it a coat of Fluid Film to keep the rust away.
Plane Block plane Wood Tin can Rebate plane


Or Wax it
Brown Wood Hardwood Metal Circle


The knob and Tote

You will decide how much the knob and tote needs but here are a few tricks to help.

I chuck the knob in the drill press.

Wood Floor Flooring Lamp Gas


Grind the head so it fits in the hole (were possible). Put a washer on the bottom of the knob.



I use a bolt with a 1/4" Philips head that's been ground down slightly so it fits inside the knob where the brass nut goes. Tighten it down with a washer and chuck it in the drill press. Only chuck it hand tight so you don't trash the threads.



Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Gas


Sand it with 60 grit if it still has a varnish or hard finish. then up through 500 (or more if desired) grit. If it had an oil finish I'll start with 220 grit. First few coats of BLO goes on with steel wool while in the drill press. If the existing finish is hard, it is usually easier to scrape it first.

This also helps with waxing. You can spin it fast enough in a drill press to heat the wax.

For the tote, I haven't found an easier way than possibly scraping if its a hard finish, and sanding as you would any other piece of wood.

Finish the wood with boiled linseed oil (BLO). If its a really dry old piece, soak it in the BLO overnight.

Troubleshooting.

If the mouth is to wide, its pretty hard to fix. You can slide the frog ahead just so far. If its still to wide, you have a couple of options.
1. Turn the plane into a jack
2. Buy a thicker iron.
3. Make it a paper weight.

I've test with shimming and haven't had a whole lot of luck.

Chatter
1. make sure its sharp
2. make sure your not taking to big of a bite. Thin down the shavings.
3. check the frog for both flatness, make sure the screws are tight, and make sure its seating well.
4. Don't go buy a thicker iron thinking it will fix it.

Then enjoy the results
Plane Smoothing plane Shoulder plane Hand tool Wood


I hope it helps and thanks for stopping by.

dw
They might be "just some planes restored" to you Don, but they're works of art to the rest of us.
 

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Tuning it up Bench plane style

I brought this magnificent (note the dripping sarcasm) piece of machinery home with me during one of my flea market outings. This is a late model Stanley #4. Its painted Blue, made in the US, has a painted cap, a shorter iron than vintage, and no toe on the tote. The knob and tote is painted black, it has an aluminum frog and a pretty cheezy lateral adjuster.

Now….why anyone but someone with a sickness for hand planes like me would buy this plane is a little beyond my understanding, unless it was given to you or almost given to you. A note, I'd rather have one of these than any handyman though, and I'd put them in a pretty close running with a Defiance line hand plane. Again, the Defiance can be made to work well pretty consistently, but it takes a little more love than a Stanley Bailey vintage or equivalent.

For clean up see http://lumberjocks.com/replies/612946

So the following is some advice on how to make almost any plane work well. I'll try to separate out my experience in the differences between these and vintage plane.

Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Jack plane


Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Shoe


If your plane needs a full restoration, as in stripping, painting, and parts replaced, go to either my restoration blog , Making a tote blog, turning a knob blog, or a list of possible places to find parts.

Sharpen it
So here is what you do. First sharpen it. See parts 7 and 10 It doesn't matter what your taste in sharpening is as long as it works for you. It MUST be sharp.

Polish the end of the cap iron
Polish the end of the cap iron This is more important than many people think. It helps with the breaking of the chip.

Check and fix the cap iron if needed. The cap iron must have good contatact with the iron. Any gap at all will collect chips, and clog. Make sure its clean and tight. It should be re-rusted by now with whatever you decided (if it needed it), or you can just wire brush it. I go into more detail here.

Flatten the frog. File the frog flat. I lock it in a vise and hold the file flat while filing it. It doesn't need to be perfect. Some like to polish this as well, but its not really necessary.

Hand Wood Finger Bumper Thumb




here is the aluminum frog flattened. The aluminum actually took a lot to flatten, but flatten quickly because …... well,.......its aluminum. I'm also not thrilled with the amount of contact area on the Blue frog, but in the end, it did work reasonably well.

Musical instrument Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory String instrument accessory Wood


Check the frog seating
Also check the frog seating. I very seldom have to do this on a vintage plane, but once in a while one does not seat properly. You can use valve grinding compound and usually it doesn't take much. In my latest restore I used a block of wood and sand paper.

Automotive lighting Sleeve Purple Motor vehicle Denim


Water Wood Paint Grey Rectangle


The best way to tell if it needs seating is as your tightening the screws, or just force the frog down on the seat. You should feel no rocking. You can also use some machinist blue to ensure you're getting good contact with the two parts.

Next flatten the sole. Use a piece of granite or a table saw top. If it proves to be real bad, I'll start it on the belt sander, like I do the sides, but I always finish it on the flatter surface of the table saw. Turn the plane front and push in all directions to keep it flat and even.

For longer planes, use sand paper from a role or cut a belt for the task.

Note, I've found the older the plane, the less flattening it'll need. You'd think just the opposite would be true with advancements in manufacturing, but anything made after the 60's usually makes it to the belt sander. The Blue stanley took longer than most I've ever done.

Vehicle door Gas Automotive lighting Gadget Bumper


Purple Wood Audio equipment Flooring Gas


Wood Automotive lighting Flooring Rectangle Floor


As I'm putting everything together I give it a coat of Fluid Film to keep the rust away.
Plane Block plane Wood Tin can Rebate plane


Or Wax it
Brown Wood Hardwood Metal Circle


The knob and Tote

You will decide how much the knob and tote needs but here are a few tricks to help.

I chuck the knob in the drill press.

Wood Floor Flooring Lamp Gas


Grind the head so it fits in the hole (were possible). Put a washer on the bottom of the knob.



I use a bolt with a 1/4" Philips head that's been ground down slightly so it fits inside the knob where the brass nut goes. Tighten it down with a washer and chuck it in the drill press. Only chuck it hand tight so you don't trash the threads.



Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Gas


Sand it with 60 grit if it still has a varnish or hard finish. then up through 500 (or more if desired) grit. If it had an oil finish I'll start with 220 grit. First few coats of BLO goes on with steel wool while in the drill press. If the existing finish is hard, it is usually easier to scrape it first.

This also helps with waxing. You can spin it fast enough in a drill press to heat the wax.

For the tote, I haven't found an easier way than possibly scraping if its a hard finish, and sanding as you would any other piece of wood.

Finish the wood with boiled linseed oil (BLO). If its a really dry old piece, soak it in the BLO overnight.

Troubleshooting.

If the mouth is to wide, its pretty hard to fix. You can slide the frog ahead just so far. If its still to wide, you have a couple of options.
1. Turn the plane into a jack
2. Buy a thicker iron.
3. Make it a paper weight.

I've test with shimming and haven't had a whole lot of luck.

Chatter
1. make sure its sharp
2. make sure your not taking to big of a bite. Thin down the shavings.
3. check the frog for both flatness, make sure the screws are tight, and make sure its seating well.
4. Don't go buy a thicker iron thinking it will fix it.

Then enjoy the results
Plane Smoothing plane Shoulder plane Hand tool Wood


I hope it helps and thanks for stopping by.

dw
yep some good ole instruction, on a subject that6 i am lacking in, thats a bunch don…the more i use my planes the more i fall in love with them, and wish i would have learned earlier…but now its onward and forward, and im really enjoying them.
 

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Tuning it up Bench plane style

I brought this magnificent (note the dripping sarcasm) piece of machinery home with me during one of my flea market outings. This is a late model Stanley #4. Its painted Blue, made in the US, has a painted cap, a shorter iron than vintage, and no toe on the tote. The knob and tote is painted black, it has an aluminum frog and a pretty cheezy lateral adjuster.

Now….why anyone but someone with a sickness for hand planes like me would buy this plane is a little beyond my understanding, unless it was given to you or almost given to you. A note, I'd rather have one of these than any handyman though, and I'd put them in a pretty close running with a Defiance line hand plane. Again, the Defiance can be made to work well pretty consistently, but it takes a little more love than a Stanley Bailey vintage or equivalent.

For clean up see http://lumberjocks.com/replies/612946

So the following is some advice on how to make almost any plane work well. I'll try to separate out my experience in the differences between these and vintage plane.

Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Jack plane


Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Shoe


If your plane needs a full restoration, as in stripping, painting, and parts replaced, go to either my restoration blog , Making a tote blog, turning a knob blog, or a list of possible places to find parts.

Sharpen it
So here is what you do. First sharpen it. See parts 7 and 10 It doesn't matter what your taste in sharpening is as long as it works for you. It MUST be sharp.

Polish the end of the cap iron
Polish the end of the cap iron This is more important than many people think. It helps with the breaking of the chip.

Check and fix the cap iron if needed. The cap iron must have good contatact with the iron. Any gap at all will collect chips, and clog. Make sure its clean and tight. It should be re-rusted by now with whatever you decided (if it needed it), or you can just wire brush it. I go into more detail here.

Flatten the frog. File the frog flat. I lock it in a vise and hold the file flat while filing it. It doesn't need to be perfect. Some like to polish this as well, but its not really necessary.

Hand Wood Finger Bumper Thumb




here is the aluminum frog flattened. The aluminum actually took a lot to flatten, but flatten quickly because …... well,.......its aluminum. I'm also not thrilled with the amount of contact area on the Blue frog, but in the end, it did work reasonably well.

Musical instrument Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory String instrument accessory Wood


Check the frog seating
Also check the frog seating. I very seldom have to do this on a vintage plane, but once in a while one does not seat properly. You can use valve grinding compound and usually it doesn't take much. In my latest restore I used a block of wood and sand paper.

Automotive lighting Sleeve Purple Motor vehicle Denim


Water Wood Paint Grey Rectangle


The best way to tell if it needs seating is as your tightening the screws, or just force the frog down on the seat. You should feel no rocking. You can also use some machinist blue to ensure you're getting good contact with the two parts.

Next flatten the sole. Use a piece of granite or a table saw top. If it proves to be real bad, I'll start it on the belt sander, like I do the sides, but I always finish it on the flatter surface of the table saw. Turn the plane front and push in all directions to keep it flat and even.

For longer planes, use sand paper from a role or cut a belt for the task.

Note, I've found the older the plane, the less flattening it'll need. You'd think just the opposite would be true with advancements in manufacturing, but anything made after the 60's usually makes it to the belt sander. The Blue stanley took longer than most I've ever done.

Vehicle door Gas Automotive lighting Gadget Bumper


Purple Wood Audio equipment Flooring Gas


Wood Automotive lighting Flooring Rectangle Floor


As I'm putting everything together I give it a coat of Fluid Film to keep the rust away.
Plane Block plane Wood Tin can Rebate plane


Or Wax it
Brown Wood Hardwood Metal Circle


The knob and Tote

You will decide how much the knob and tote needs but here are a few tricks to help.

I chuck the knob in the drill press.

Wood Floor Flooring Lamp Gas


Grind the head so it fits in the hole (were possible). Put a washer on the bottom of the knob.



I use a bolt with a 1/4" Philips head that's been ground down slightly so it fits inside the knob where the brass nut goes. Tighten it down with a washer and chuck it in the drill press. Only chuck it hand tight so you don't trash the threads.



Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Gas


Sand it with 60 grit if it still has a varnish or hard finish. then up through 500 (or more if desired) grit. If it had an oil finish I'll start with 220 grit. First few coats of BLO goes on with steel wool while in the drill press. If the existing finish is hard, it is usually easier to scrape it first.

This also helps with waxing. You can spin it fast enough in a drill press to heat the wax.

For the tote, I haven't found an easier way than possibly scraping if its a hard finish, and sanding as you would any other piece of wood.

Finish the wood with boiled linseed oil (BLO). If its a really dry old piece, soak it in the BLO overnight.

Troubleshooting.

If the mouth is to wide, its pretty hard to fix. You can slide the frog ahead just so far. If its still to wide, you have a couple of options.
1. Turn the plane into a jack
2. Buy a thicker iron.
3. Make it a paper weight.

I've test with shimming and haven't had a whole lot of luck.

Chatter
1. make sure its sharp
2. make sure your not taking to big of a bite. Thin down the shavings.
3. check the frog for both flatness, make sure the screws are tight, and make sure its seating well.
4. Don't go buy a thicker iron thinking it will fix it.

Then enjoy the results
Plane Smoothing plane Shoulder plane Hand tool Wood


I hope it helps and thanks for stopping by.

dw
Don I always pick up a few tips and tricks.
Great tutorial.
 

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Tuning it up Bench plane style

I brought this magnificent (note the dripping sarcasm) piece of machinery home with me during one of my flea market outings. This is a late model Stanley #4. Its painted Blue, made in the US, has a painted cap, a shorter iron than vintage, and no toe on the tote. The knob and tote is painted black, it has an aluminum frog and a pretty cheezy lateral adjuster.

Now….why anyone but someone with a sickness for hand planes like me would buy this plane is a little beyond my understanding, unless it was given to you or almost given to you. A note, I'd rather have one of these than any handyman though, and I'd put them in a pretty close running with a Defiance line hand plane. Again, the Defiance can be made to work well pretty consistently, but it takes a little more love than a Stanley Bailey vintage or equivalent.

For clean up see http://lumberjocks.com/replies/612946

So the following is some advice on how to make almost any plane work well. I'll try to separate out my experience in the differences between these and vintage plane.

Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Jack plane


Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Shoe


If your plane needs a full restoration, as in stripping, painting, and parts replaced, go to either my restoration blog , Making a tote blog, turning a knob blog, or a list of possible places to find parts.

Sharpen it
So here is what you do. First sharpen it. See parts 7 and 10 It doesn't matter what your taste in sharpening is as long as it works for you. It MUST be sharp.

Polish the end of the cap iron
Polish the end of the cap iron This is more important than many people think. It helps with the breaking of the chip.

Check and fix the cap iron if needed. The cap iron must have good contatact with the iron. Any gap at all will collect chips, and clog. Make sure its clean and tight. It should be re-rusted by now with whatever you decided (if it needed it), or you can just wire brush it. I go into more detail here.

Flatten the frog. File the frog flat. I lock it in a vise and hold the file flat while filing it. It doesn't need to be perfect. Some like to polish this as well, but its not really necessary.

Hand Wood Finger Bumper Thumb




here is the aluminum frog flattened. The aluminum actually took a lot to flatten, but flatten quickly because …... well,.......its aluminum. I'm also not thrilled with the amount of contact area on the Blue frog, but in the end, it did work reasonably well.

Musical instrument Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory String instrument accessory Wood


Check the frog seating
Also check the frog seating. I very seldom have to do this on a vintage plane, but once in a while one does not seat properly. You can use valve grinding compound and usually it doesn't take much. In my latest restore I used a block of wood and sand paper.

Automotive lighting Sleeve Purple Motor vehicle Denim


Water Wood Paint Grey Rectangle


The best way to tell if it needs seating is as your tightening the screws, or just force the frog down on the seat. You should feel no rocking. You can also use some machinist blue to ensure you're getting good contact with the two parts.

Next flatten the sole. Use a piece of granite or a table saw top. If it proves to be real bad, I'll start it on the belt sander, like I do the sides, but I always finish it on the flatter surface of the table saw. Turn the plane front and push in all directions to keep it flat and even.

For longer planes, use sand paper from a role or cut a belt for the task.

Note, I've found the older the plane, the less flattening it'll need. You'd think just the opposite would be true with advancements in manufacturing, but anything made after the 60's usually makes it to the belt sander. The Blue stanley took longer than most I've ever done.

Vehicle door Gas Automotive lighting Gadget Bumper


Purple Wood Audio equipment Flooring Gas


Wood Automotive lighting Flooring Rectangle Floor


As I'm putting everything together I give it a coat of Fluid Film to keep the rust away.
Plane Block plane Wood Tin can Rebate plane


Or Wax it
Brown Wood Hardwood Metal Circle


The knob and Tote

You will decide how much the knob and tote needs but here are a few tricks to help.

I chuck the knob in the drill press.

Wood Floor Flooring Lamp Gas


Grind the head so it fits in the hole (were possible). Put a washer on the bottom of the knob.



I use a bolt with a 1/4" Philips head that's been ground down slightly so it fits inside the knob where the brass nut goes. Tighten it down with a washer and chuck it in the drill press. Only chuck it hand tight so you don't trash the threads.



Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Gas


Sand it with 60 grit if it still has a varnish or hard finish. then up through 500 (or more if desired) grit. If it had an oil finish I'll start with 220 grit. First few coats of BLO goes on with steel wool while in the drill press. If the existing finish is hard, it is usually easier to scrape it first.

This also helps with waxing. You can spin it fast enough in a drill press to heat the wax.

For the tote, I haven't found an easier way than possibly scraping if its a hard finish, and sanding as you would any other piece of wood.

Finish the wood with boiled linseed oil (BLO). If its a really dry old piece, soak it in the BLO overnight.

Troubleshooting.

If the mouth is to wide, its pretty hard to fix. You can slide the frog ahead just so far. If its still to wide, you have a couple of options.
1. Turn the plane into a jack
2. Buy a thicker iron.
3. Make it a paper weight.

I've test with shimming and haven't had a whole lot of luck.

Chatter
1. make sure its sharp
2. make sure your not taking to big of a bite. Thin down the shavings.
3. check the frog for both flatness, make sure the screws are tight, and make sure its seating well.
4. Don't go buy a thicker iron thinking it will fix it.

Then enjoy the results
Plane Smoothing plane Shoulder plane Hand tool Wood


I hope it helps and thanks for stopping by.

dw
Thanks for sharing your knowledge. I have learned a lot from your threads and posts in my time on this site. I appreciate it, and I am thankful for your efforts in posting this type of stuff.
 

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Tuning it up Bench plane style

I brought this magnificent (note the dripping sarcasm) piece of machinery home with me during one of my flea market outings. This is a late model Stanley #4. Its painted Blue, made in the US, has a painted cap, a shorter iron than vintage, and no toe on the tote. The knob and tote is painted black, it has an aluminum frog and a pretty cheezy lateral adjuster.

Now….why anyone but someone with a sickness for hand planes like me would buy this plane is a little beyond my understanding, unless it was given to you or almost given to you. A note, I'd rather have one of these than any handyman though, and I'd put them in a pretty close running with a Defiance line hand plane. Again, the Defiance can be made to work well pretty consistently, but it takes a little more love than a Stanley Bailey vintage or equivalent.

For clean up see http://lumberjocks.com/replies/612946

So the following is some advice on how to make almost any plane work well. I'll try to separate out my experience in the differences between these and vintage plane.

Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Jack plane


Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Shoe


If your plane needs a full restoration, as in stripping, painting, and parts replaced, go to either my restoration blog , Making a tote blog, turning a knob blog, or a list of possible places to find parts.

Sharpen it
So here is what you do. First sharpen it. See parts 7 and 10 It doesn't matter what your taste in sharpening is as long as it works for you. It MUST be sharp.

Polish the end of the cap iron
Polish the end of the cap iron This is more important than many people think. It helps with the breaking of the chip.

Check and fix the cap iron if needed. The cap iron must have good contatact with the iron. Any gap at all will collect chips, and clog. Make sure its clean and tight. It should be re-rusted by now with whatever you decided (if it needed it), or you can just wire brush it. I go into more detail here.

Flatten the frog. File the frog flat. I lock it in a vise and hold the file flat while filing it. It doesn't need to be perfect. Some like to polish this as well, but its not really necessary.

Hand Wood Finger Bumper Thumb




here is the aluminum frog flattened. The aluminum actually took a lot to flatten, but flatten quickly because …... well,.......its aluminum. I'm also not thrilled with the amount of contact area on the Blue frog, but in the end, it did work reasonably well.

Musical instrument Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory String instrument accessory Wood


Check the frog seating
Also check the frog seating. I very seldom have to do this on a vintage plane, but once in a while one does not seat properly. You can use valve grinding compound and usually it doesn't take much. In my latest restore I used a block of wood and sand paper.

Automotive lighting Sleeve Purple Motor vehicle Denim


Water Wood Paint Grey Rectangle


The best way to tell if it needs seating is as your tightening the screws, or just force the frog down on the seat. You should feel no rocking. You can also use some machinist blue to ensure you're getting good contact with the two parts.

Next flatten the sole. Use a piece of granite or a table saw top. If it proves to be real bad, I'll start it on the belt sander, like I do the sides, but I always finish it on the flatter surface of the table saw. Turn the plane front and push in all directions to keep it flat and even.

For longer planes, use sand paper from a role or cut a belt for the task.

Note, I've found the older the plane, the less flattening it'll need. You'd think just the opposite would be true with advancements in manufacturing, but anything made after the 60's usually makes it to the belt sander. The Blue stanley took longer than most I've ever done.

Vehicle door Gas Automotive lighting Gadget Bumper


Purple Wood Audio equipment Flooring Gas


Wood Automotive lighting Flooring Rectangle Floor


As I'm putting everything together I give it a coat of Fluid Film to keep the rust away.
Plane Block plane Wood Tin can Rebate plane


Or Wax it
Brown Wood Hardwood Metal Circle


The knob and Tote

You will decide how much the knob and tote needs but here are a few tricks to help.

I chuck the knob in the drill press.

Wood Floor Flooring Lamp Gas


Grind the head so it fits in the hole (were possible). Put a washer on the bottom of the knob.



I use a bolt with a 1/4" Philips head that's been ground down slightly so it fits inside the knob where the brass nut goes. Tighten it down with a washer and chuck it in the drill press. Only chuck it hand tight so you don't trash the threads.



Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Gas


Sand it with 60 grit if it still has a varnish or hard finish. then up through 500 (or more if desired) grit. If it had an oil finish I'll start with 220 grit. First few coats of BLO goes on with steel wool while in the drill press. If the existing finish is hard, it is usually easier to scrape it first.

This also helps with waxing. You can spin it fast enough in a drill press to heat the wax.

For the tote, I haven't found an easier way than possibly scraping if its a hard finish, and sanding as you would any other piece of wood.

Finish the wood with boiled linseed oil (BLO). If its a really dry old piece, soak it in the BLO overnight.

Troubleshooting.

If the mouth is to wide, its pretty hard to fix. You can slide the frog ahead just so far. If its still to wide, you have a couple of options.
1. Turn the plane into a jack
2. Buy a thicker iron.
3. Make it a paper weight.

I've test with shimming and haven't had a whole lot of luck.

Chatter
1. make sure its sharp
2. make sure your not taking to big of a bite. Thin down the shavings.
3. check the frog for both flatness, make sure the screws are tight, and make sure its seating well.
4. Don't go buy a thicker iron thinking it will fix it.

Then enjoy the results
Plane Smoothing plane Shoulder plane Hand tool Wood


I hope it helps and thanks for stopping by.

dw
Thanks for the free tutorial Don, always good to receive advice from folks who know what they are talking about.

Cheers

David
 

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Tuning it up Bench plane style

I brought this magnificent (note the dripping sarcasm) piece of machinery home with me during one of my flea market outings. This is a late model Stanley #4. Its painted Blue, made in the US, has a painted cap, a shorter iron than vintage, and no toe on the tote. The knob and tote is painted black, it has an aluminum frog and a pretty cheezy lateral adjuster.

Now….why anyone but someone with a sickness for hand planes like me would buy this plane is a little beyond my understanding, unless it was given to you or almost given to you. A note, I'd rather have one of these than any handyman though, and I'd put them in a pretty close running with a Defiance line hand plane. Again, the Defiance can be made to work well pretty consistently, but it takes a little more love than a Stanley Bailey vintage or equivalent.

For clean up see http://lumberjocks.com/replies/612946

So the following is some advice on how to make almost any plane work well. I'll try to separate out my experience in the differences between these and vintage plane.





If your plane needs a full restoration, as in stripping, painting, and parts replaced, go to either my restoration blog , Making a tote blog, turning a knob blog, or a list of possible places to find parts.

Sharpen it
So here is what you do. First sharpen it. See parts 7 and 10 It doesn't matter what your taste in sharpening is as long as it works for you. It MUST be sharp.

Polish the end of the cap iron
Polish the end of the cap iron This is more important than many people think. It helps with the breaking of the chip.

Check and fix the cap iron if needed. The cap iron must have good contatact with the iron. Any gap at all will collect chips, and clog. Make sure its clean and tight. It should be re-rusted by now with whatever you decided (if it needed it), or you can just wire brush it. I go into more detail here.

Flatten the frog. File the frog flat. I lock it in a vise and hold the file flat while filing it. It doesn't need to be perfect. Some like to polish this as well, but its not really necessary.





here is the aluminum frog flattened. The aluminum actually took a lot to flatten, but flatten quickly because …... well,.......its aluminum. I'm also not thrilled with the amount of contact area on the Blue frog, but in the end, it did work reasonably well.



Check the frog seating
Also check the frog seating. I very seldom have to do this on a vintage plane, but once in a while one does not seat properly. You can use valve grinding compound and usually it doesn't take much. In my latest restore I used a block of wood and sand paper.





The best way to tell if it needs seating is as your tightening the screws, or just force the frog down on the seat. You should feel no rocking. You can also use some machinist blue to ensure you're getting good contact with the two parts.

Next flatten the sole. Use a piece of granite or a table saw top. If it proves to be real bad, I'll start it on the belt sander, like I do the sides, but I always finish it on the flatter surface of the table saw. Turn the plane front and push in all directions to keep it flat and even.

For longer planes, use sand paper from a role or cut a belt for the task.

Note, I've found the older the plane, the less flattening it'll need. You'd think just the opposite would be true with advancements in manufacturing, but anything made after the 60's usually makes it to the belt sander. The Blue stanley took longer than most I've ever done.







As I'm putting everything together I give it a coat of Fluid Film to keep the rust away.


Or Wax it


The knob and Tote

You will decide how much the knob and tote needs but here are a few tricks to help.

I chuck the knob in the drill press.



Grind the head so it fits in the hole (were possible). Put a washer on the bottom of the knob.



I use a bolt with a 1/4" Philips head that's been ground down slightly so it fits inside the knob where the brass nut goes. Tighten it down with a washer and chuck it in the drill press. Only chuck it hand tight so you don't trash the threads.





Sand it with 60 grit if it still has a varnish or hard finish. then up through 500 (or more if desired) grit. If it had an oil finish I'll start with 220 grit. First few coats of BLO goes on with steel wool while in the drill press. If the existing finish is hard, it is usually easier to scrape it first.

This also helps with waxing. You can spin it fast enough in a drill press to heat the wax.

For the tote, I haven't found an easier way than possibly scraping if its a hard finish, and sanding as you would any other piece of wood.

Finish the wood with boiled linseed oil (BLO). If its a really dry old piece, soak it in the BLO overnight.

Troubleshooting.

If the mouth is to wide, its pretty hard to fix. You can slide the frog ahead just so far. If its still to wide, you have a couple of options.
1. Turn the plane into a jack
2. Buy a thicker iron.
3. Make it a paper weight.

I've test with shimming and haven't had a whole lot of luck.

Chatter
1. make sure its sharp
2. make sure your not taking to big of a bite. Thin down the shavings.
3. check the frog for both flatness, make sure the screws are tight, and make sure its seating well.
4. Don't go buy a thicker iron thinking it will fix it.

Then enjoy the results


I hope it helps and thanks for stopping by.

dw
Fine job saving Old Blue, you are to commended for your dedicated efforts. At least it appears to have slotted screws; I draw the line at any plane having phillips head screws. :)

Excellent tutorial as usual, Don Yoda. Nice pics, too. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #135 ·
Tuning it up Bench plane style

I brought this magnificent (note the dripping sarcasm) piece of machinery home with me during one of my flea market outings. This is a late model Stanley #4. Its painted Blue, made in the US, has a painted cap, a shorter iron than vintage, and no toe on the tote. The knob and tote is painted black, it has an aluminum frog and a pretty cheezy lateral adjuster.

Now….why anyone but someone with a sickness for hand planes like me would buy this plane is a little beyond my understanding, unless it was given to you or almost given to you. A note, I'd rather have one of these than any handyman though, and I'd put them in a pretty close running with a Defiance line hand plane. Again, the Defiance can be made to work well pretty consistently, but it takes a little more love than a Stanley Bailey vintage or equivalent.

For clean up see http://lumberjocks.com/replies/612946

So the following is some advice on how to make almost any plane work well. I'll try to separate out my experience in the differences between these and vintage plane.

Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Jack plane


Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Shoe


If your plane needs a full restoration, as in stripping, painting, and parts replaced, go to either my restoration blog , Making a tote blog, turning a knob blog, or a list of possible places to find parts.

Sharpen it
So here is what you do. First sharpen it. See parts 7 and 10 It doesn't matter what your taste in sharpening is as long as it works for you. It MUST be sharp.

Polish the end of the cap iron
Polish the end of the cap iron This is more important than many people think. It helps with the breaking of the chip.

Check and fix the cap iron if needed. The cap iron must have good contatact with the iron. Any gap at all will collect chips, and clog. Make sure its clean and tight. It should be re-rusted by now with whatever you decided (if it needed it), or you can just wire brush it. I go into more detail here.

Flatten the frog. File the frog flat. I lock it in a vise and hold the file flat while filing it. It doesn't need to be perfect. Some like to polish this as well, but its not really necessary.

Hand Wood Finger Bumper Thumb




here is the aluminum frog flattened. The aluminum actually took a lot to flatten, but flatten quickly because …... well,.......its aluminum. I'm also not thrilled with the amount of contact area on the Blue frog, but in the end, it did work reasonably well.

Musical instrument Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory String instrument accessory Wood


Check the frog seating
Also check the frog seating. I very seldom have to do this on a vintage plane, but once in a while one does not seat properly. You can use valve grinding compound and usually it doesn't take much. In my latest restore I used a block of wood and sand paper.

Automotive lighting Sleeve Purple Motor vehicle Denim


Water Wood Paint Grey Rectangle


The best way to tell if it needs seating is as your tightening the screws, or just force the frog down on the seat. You should feel no rocking. You can also use some machinist blue to ensure you're getting good contact with the two parts.

Next flatten the sole. Use a piece of granite or a table saw top. If it proves to be real bad, I'll start it on the belt sander, like I do the sides, but I always finish it on the flatter surface of the table saw. Turn the plane front and push in all directions to keep it flat and even.

For longer planes, use sand paper from a role or cut a belt for the task.

Note, I've found the older the plane, the less flattening it'll need. You'd think just the opposite would be true with advancements in manufacturing, but anything made after the 60's usually makes it to the belt sander. The Blue stanley took longer than most I've ever done.

Vehicle door Gas Automotive lighting Gadget Bumper


Purple Wood Audio equipment Flooring Gas


Wood Automotive lighting Flooring Rectangle Floor


As I'm putting everything together I give it a coat of Fluid Film to keep the rust away.
Plane Block plane Wood Tin can Rebate plane


Or Wax it
Brown Wood Hardwood Metal Circle


The knob and Tote

You will decide how much the knob and tote needs but here are a few tricks to help.

I chuck the knob in the drill press.

Wood Floor Flooring Lamp Gas


Grind the head so it fits in the hole (were possible). Put a washer on the bottom of the knob.



I use a bolt with a 1/4" Philips head that's been ground down slightly so it fits inside the knob where the brass nut goes. Tighten it down with a washer and chuck it in the drill press. Only chuck it hand tight so you don't trash the threads.



Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Gas


Sand it with 60 grit if it still has a varnish or hard finish. then up through 500 (or more if desired) grit. If it had an oil finish I'll start with 220 grit. First few coats of BLO goes on with steel wool while in the drill press. If the existing finish is hard, it is usually easier to scrape it first.

This also helps with waxing. You can spin it fast enough in a drill press to heat the wax.

For the tote, I haven't found an easier way than possibly scraping if its a hard finish, and sanding as you would any other piece of wood.

Finish the wood with boiled linseed oil (BLO). If its a really dry old piece, soak it in the BLO overnight.

Troubleshooting.

If the mouth is to wide, its pretty hard to fix. You can slide the frog ahead just so far. If its still to wide, you have a couple of options.
1. Turn the plane into a jack
2. Buy a thicker iron.
3. Make it a paper weight.

I've test with shimming and haven't had a whole lot of luck.

Chatter
1. make sure its sharp
2. make sure your not taking to big of a bite. Thin down the shavings.
3. check the frog for both flatness, make sure the screws are tight, and make sure its seating well.
4. Don't go buy a thicker iron thinking it will fix it.

Then enjoy the results
Plane Smoothing plane Shoulder plane Hand tool Wood


I hope it helps and thanks for stopping by.

dw
Thanks everyone.

Andy, I had to change the series. I wrote this in a layover, so I may have rushed a bit, although with the delays, I had plenty of time.
 

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Tuning it up Bench plane style

I brought this magnificent (note the dripping sarcasm) piece of machinery home with me during one of my flea market outings. This is a late model Stanley #4. Its painted Blue, made in the US, has a painted cap, a shorter iron than vintage, and no toe on the tote. The knob and tote is painted black, it has an aluminum frog and a pretty cheezy lateral adjuster.

Now….why anyone but someone with a sickness for hand planes like me would buy this plane is a little beyond my understanding, unless it was given to you or almost given to you. A note, I'd rather have one of these than any handyman though, and I'd put them in a pretty close running with a Defiance line hand plane. Again, the Defiance can be made to work well pretty consistently, but it takes a little more love than a Stanley Bailey vintage or equivalent.

For clean up see http://lumberjocks.com/replies/612946

So the following is some advice on how to make almost any plane work well. I'll try to separate out my experience in the differences between these and vintage plane.

Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Jack plane


Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Shoe


If your plane needs a full restoration, as in stripping, painting, and parts replaced, go to either my restoration blog , Making a tote blog, turning a knob blog, or a list of possible places to find parts.

Sharpen it
So here is what you do. First sharpen it. See parts 7 and 10 It doesn't matter what your taste in sharpening is as long as it works for you. It MUST be sharp.

Polish the end of the cap iron
Polish the end of the cap iron This is more important than many people think. It helps with the breaking of the chip.

Check and fix the cap iron if needed. The cap iron must have good contatact with the iron. Any gap at all will collect chips, and clog. Make sure its clean and tight. It should be re-rusted by now with whatever you decided (if it needed it), or you can just wire brush it. I go into more detail here.

Flatten the frog. File the frog flat. I lock it in a vise and hold the file flat while filing it. It doesn't need to be perfect. Some like to polish this as well, but its not really necessary.

Hand Wood Finger Bumper Thumb




here is the aluminum frog flattened. The aluminum actually took a lot to flatten, but flatten quickly because …... well,.......its aluminum. I'm also not thrilled with the amount of contact area on the Blue frog, but in the end, it did work reasonably well.

Musical instrument Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory String instrument accessory Wood


Check the frog seating
Also check the frog seating. I very seldom have to do this on a vintage plane, but once in a while one does not seat properly. You can use valve grinding compound and usually it doesn't take much. In my latest restore I used a block of wood and sand paper.

Automotive lighting Sleeve Purple Motor vehicle Denim


Water Wood Paint Grey Rectangle


The best way to tell if it needs seating is as your tightening the screws, or just force the frog down on the seat. You should feel no rocking. You can also use some machinist blue to ensure you're getting good contact with the two parts.

Next flatten the sole. Use a piece of granite or a table saw top. If it proves to be real bad, I'll start it on the belt sander, like I do the sides, but I always finish it on the flatter surface of the table saw. Turn the plane front and push in all directions to keep it flat and even.

For longer planes, use sand paper from a role or cut a belt for the task.

Note, I've found the older the plane, the less flattening it'll need. You'd think just the opposite would be true with advancements in manufacturing, but anything made after the 60's usually makes it to the belt sander. The Blue stanley took longer than most I've ever done.

Vehicle door Gas Automotive lighting Gadget Bumper


Purple Wood Audio equipment Flooring Gas


Wood Automotive lighting Flooring Rectangle Floor


As I'm putting everything together I give it a coat of Fluid Film to keep the rust away.
Plane Block plane Wood Tin can Rebate plane


Or Wax it
Brown Wood Hardwood Metal Circle


The knob and Tote

You will decide how much the knob and tote needs but here are a few tricks to help.

I chuck the knob in the drill press.

Wood Floor Flooring Lamp Gas


Grind the head so it fits in the hole (were possible). Put a washer on the bottom of the knob.



I use a bolt with a 1/4" Philips head that's been ground down slightly so it fits inside the knob where the brass nut goes. Tighten it down with a washer and chuck it in the drill press. Only chuck it hand tight so you don't trash the threads.



Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Gas


Sand it with 60 grit if it still has a varnish or hard finish. then up through 500 (or more if desired) grit. If it had an oil finish I'll start with 220 grit. First few coats of BLO goes on with steel wool while in the drill press. If the existing finish is hard, it is usually easier to scrape it first.

This also helps with waxing. You can spin it fast enough in a drill press to heat the wax.

For the tote, I haven't found an easier way than possibly scraping if its a hard finish, and sanding as you would any other piece of wood.

Finish the wood with boiled linseed oil (BLO). If its a really dry old piece, soak it in the BLO overnight.

Troubleshooting.

If the mouth is to wide, its pretty hard to fix. You can slide the frog ahead just so far. If its still to wide, you have a couple of options.
1. Turn the plane into a jack
2. Buy a thicker iron.
3. Make it a paper weight.

I've test with shimming and haven't had a whole lot of luck.

Chatter
1. make sure its sharp
2. make sure your not taking to big of a bite. Thin down the shavings.
3. check the frog for both flatness, make sure the screws are tight, and make sure its seating well.
4. Don't go buy a thicker iron thinking it will fix it.

Then enjoy the results
Plane Smoothing plane Shoulder plane Hand tool Wood


I hope it helps and thanks for stopping by.

dw
Thanks Don.
 

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Tuning it up Bench plane style

I brought this magnificent (note the dripping sarcasm) piece of machinery home with me during one of my flea market outings. This is a late model Stanley #4. Its painted Blue, made in the US, has a painted cap, a shorter iron than vintage, and no toe on the tote. The knob and tote is painted black, it has an aluminum frog and a pretty cheezy lateral adjuster.

Now….why anyone but someone with a sickness for hand planes like me would buy this plane is a little beyond my understanding, unless it was given to you or almost given to you. A note, I'd rather have one of these than any handyman though, and I'd put them in a pretty close running with a Defiance line hand plane. Again, the Defiance can be made to work well pretty consistently, but it takes a little more love than a Stanley Bailey vintage or equivalent.

For clean up see http://lumberjocks.com/replies/612946

So the following is some advice on how to make almost any plane work well. I'll try to separate out my experience in the differences between these and vintage plane.

Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Jack plane


Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Shoe


If your plane needs a full restoration, as in stripping, painting, and parts replaced, go to either my restoration blog , Making a tote blog, turning a knob blog, or a list of possible places to find parts.

Sharpen it
So here is what you do. First sharpen it. See parts 7 and 10 It doesn't matter what your taste in sharpening is as long as it works for you. It MUST be sharp.

Polish the end of the cap iron
Polish the end of the cap iron This is more important than many people think. It helps with the breaking of the chip.

Check and fix the cap iron if needed. The cap iron must have good contatact with the iron. Any gap at all will collect chips, and clog. Make sure its clean and tight. It should be re-rusted by now with whatever you decided (if it needed it), or you can just wire brush it. I go into more detail here.

Flatten the frog. File the frog flat. I lock it in a vise and hold the file flat while filing it. It doesn't need to be perfect. Some like to polish this as well, but its not really necessary.

Hand Wood Finger Bumper Thumb




here is the aluminum frog flattened. The aluminum actually took a lot to flatten, but flatten quickly because …... well,.......its aluminum. I'm also not thrilled with the amount of contact area on the Blue frog, but in the end, it did work reasonably well.

Musical instrument Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory String instrument accessory Wood


Check the frog seating
Also check the frog seating. I very seldom have to do this on a vintage plane, but once in a while one does not seat properly. You can use valve grinding compound and usually it doesn't take much. In my latest restore I used a block of wood and sand paper.

Automotive lighting Sleeve Purple Motor vehicle Denim


Water Wood Paint Grey Rectangle


The best way to tell if it needs seating is as your tightening the screws, or just force the frog down on the seat. You should feel no rocking. You can also use some machinist blue to ensure you're getting good contact with the two parts.

Next flatten the sole. Use a piece of granite or a table saw top. If it proves to be real bad, I'll start it on the belt sander, like I do the sides, but I always finish it on the flatter surface of the table saw. Turn the plane front and push in all directions to keep it flat and even.

For longer planes, use sand paper from a role or cut a belt for the task.

Note, I've found the older the plane, the less flattening it'll need. You'd think just the opposite would be true with advancements in manufacturing, but anything made after the 60's usually makes it to the belt sander. The Blue stanley took longer than most I've ever done.

Vehicle door Gas Automotive lighting Gadget Bumper


Purple Wood Audio equipment Flooring Gas


Wood Automotive lighting Flooring Rectangle Floor


As I'm putting everything together I give it a coat of Fluid Film to keep the rust away.
Plane Block plane Wood Tin can Rebate plane


Or Wax it
Brown Wood Hardwood Metal Circle


The knob and Tote

You will decide how much the knob and tote needs but here are a few tricks to help.

I chuck the knob in the drill press.

Wood Floor Flooring Lamp Gas


Grind the head so it fits in the hole (were possible). Put a washer on the bottom of the knob.



I use a bolt with a 1/4" Philips head that's been ground down slightly so it fits inside the knob where the brass nut goes. Tighten it down with a washer and chuck it in the drill press. Only chuck it hand tight so you don't trash the threads.



Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Gas


Sand it with 60 grit if it still has a varnish or hard finish. then up through 500 (or more if desired) grit. If it had an oil finish I'll start with 220 grit. First few coats of BLO goes on with steel wool while in the drill press. If the existing finish is hard, it is usually easier to scrape it first.

This also helps with waxing. You can spin it fast enough in a drill press to heat the wax.

For the tote, I haven't found an easier way than possibly scraping if its a hard finish, and sanding as you would any other piece of wood.

Finish the wood with boiled linseed oil (BLO). If its a really dry old piece, soak it in the BLO overnight.

Troubleshooting.

If the mouth is to wide, its pretty hard to fix. You can slide the frog ahead just so far. If its still to wide, you have a couple of options.
1. Turn the plane into a jack
2. Buy a thicker iron.
3. Make it a paper weight.

I've test with shimming and haven't had a whole lot of luck.

Chatter
1. make sure its sharp
2. make sure your not taking to big of a bite. Thin down the shavings.
3. check the frog for both flatness, make sure the screws are tight, and make sure its seating well.
4. Don't go buy a thicker iron thinking it will fix it.

Then enjoy the results
Plane Smoothing plane Shoulder plane Hand tool Wood


I hope it helps and thanks for stopping by.

dw
Great resource Don, thanks for putting this together.
 

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Tuning it up Bench plane style

I brought this magnificent (note the dripping sarcasm) piece of machinery home with me during one of my flea market outings. This is a late model Stanley #4. Its painted Blue, made in the US, has a painted cap, a shorter iron than vintage, and no toe on the tote. The knob and tote is painted black, it has an aluminum frog and a pretty cheezy lateral adjuster.

Now….why anyone but someone with a sickness for hand planes like me would buy this plane is a little beyond my understanding, unless it was given to you or almost given to you. A note, I'd rather have one of these than any handyman though, and I'd put them in a pretty close running with a Defiance line hand plane. Again, the Defiance can be made to work well pretty consistently, but it takes a little more love than a Stanley Bailey vintage or equivalent.

For clean up see http://lumberjocks.com/replies/612946

So the following is some advice on how to make almost any plane work well. I'll try to separate out my experience in the differences between these and vintage plane.

Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Jack plane


Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Shoe


If your plane needs a full restoration, as in stripping, painting, and parts replaced, go to either my restoration blog , Making a tote blog, turning a knob blog, or a list of possible places to find parts.

Sharpen it
So here is what you do. First sharpen it. See parts 7 and 10 It doesn't matter what your taste in sharpening is as long as it works for you. It MUST be sharp.

Polish the end of the cap iron
Polish the end of the cap iron This is more important than many people think. It helps with the breaking of the chip.

Check and fix the cap iron if needed. The cap iron must have good contatact with the iron. Any gap at all will collect chips, and clog. Make sure its clean and tight. It should be re-rusted by now with whatever you decided (if it needed it), or you can just wire brush it. I go into more detail here.

Flatten the frog. File the frog flat. I lock it in a vise and hold the file flat while filing it. It doesn't need to be perfect. Some like to polish this as well, but its not really necessary.

Hand Wood Finger Bumper Thumb




here is the aluminum frog flattened. The aluminum actually took a lot to flatten, but flatten quickly because …... well,.......its aluminum. I'm also not thrilled with the amount of contact area on the Blue frog, but in the end, it did work reasonably well.

Musical instrument Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory String instrument accessory Wood


Check the frog seating
Also check the frog seating. I very seldom have to do this on a vintage plane, but once in a while one does not seat properly. You can use valve grinding compound and usually it doesn't take much. In my latest restore I used a block of wood and sand paper.

Automotive lighting Sleeve Purple Motor vehicle Denim


Water Wood Paint Grey Rectangle


The best way to tell if it needs seating is as your tightening the screws, or just force the frog down on the seat. You should feel no rocking. You can also use some machinist blue to ensure you're getting good contact with the two parts.

Next flatten the sole. Use a piece of granite or a table saw top. If it proves to be real bad, I'll start it on the belt sander, like I do the sides, but I always finish it on the flatter surface of the table saw. Turn the plane front and push in all directions to keep it flat and even.

For longer planes, use sand paper from a role or cut a belt for the task.

Note, I've found the older the plane, the less flattening it'll need. You'd think just the opposite would be true with advancements in manufacturing, but anything made after the 60's usually makes it to the belt sander. The Blue stanley took longer than most I've ever done.

Vehicle door Gas Automotive lighting Gadget Bumper


Purple Wood Audio equipment Flooring Gas


Wood Automotive lighting Flooring Rectangle Floor


As I'm putting everything together I give it a coat of Fluid Film to keep the rust away.
Plane Block plane Wood Tin can Rebate plane


Or Wax it
Brown Wood Hardwood Metal Circle


The knob and Tote

You will decide how much the knob and tote needs but here are a few tricks to help.

I chuck the knob in the drill press.

Wood Floor Flooring Lamp Gas


Grind the head so it fits in the hole (were possible). Put a washer on the bottom of the knob.



I use a bolt with a 1/4" Philips head that's been ground down slightly so it fits inside the knob where the brass nut goes. Tighten it down with a washer and chuck it in the drill press. Only chuck it hand tight so you don't trash the threads.



Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Gas


Sand it with 60 grit if it still has a varnish or hard finish. then up through 500 (or more if desired) grit. If it had an oil finish I'll start with 220 grit. First few coats of BLO goes on with steel wool while in the drill press. If the existing finish is hard, it is usually easier to scrape it first.

This also helps with waxing. You can spin it fast enough in a drill press to heat the wax.

For the tote, I haven't found an easier way than possibly scraping if its a hard finish, and sanding as you would any other piece of wood.

Finish the wood with boiled linseed oil (BLO). If its a really dry old piece, soak it in the BLO overnight.

Troubleshooting.

If the mouth is to wide, its pretty hard to fix. You can slide the frog ahead just so far. If its still to wide, you have a couple of options.
1. Turn the plane into a jack
2. Buy a thicker iron.
3. Make it a paper weight.

I've test with shimming and haven't had a whole lot of luck.

Chatter
1. make sure its sharp
2. make sure your not taking to big of a bite. Thin down the shavings.
3. check the frog for both flatness, make sure the screws are tight, and make sure its seating well.
4. Don't go buy a thicker iron thinking it will fix it.

Then enjoy the results
Plane Smoothing plane Shoulder plane Hand tool Wood


I hope it helps and thanks for stopping by.

dw
Excellent tutorial Don.
 

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Tuning it up Bench plane style

I brought this magnificent (note the dripping sarcasm) piece of machinery home with me during one of my flea market outings. This is a late model Stanley #4. Its painted Blue, made in the US, has a painted cap, a shorter iron than vintage, and no toe on the tote. The knob and tote is painted black, it has an aluminum frog and a pretty cheezy lateral adjuster.

Now….why anyone but someone with a sickness for hand planes like me would buy this plane is a little beyond my understanding, unless it was given to you or almost given to you. A note, I'd rather have one of these than any handyman though, and I'd put them in a pretty close running with a Defiance line hand plane. Again, the Defiance can be made to work well pretty consistently, but it takes a little more love than a Stanley Bailey vintage or equivalent.

For clean up see http://lumberjocks.com/replies/612946

So the following is some advice on how to make almost any plane work well. I'll try to separate out my experience in the differences between these and vintage plane.

Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Jack plane


Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Shoe


If your plane needs a full restoration, as in stripping, painting, and parts replaced, go to either my restoration blog , Making a tote blog, turning a knob blog, or a list of possible places to find parts.

Sharpen it
So here is what you do. First sharpen it. See parts 7 and 10 It doesn't matter what your taste in sharpening is as long as it works for you. It MUST be sharp.

Polish the end of the cap iron
Polish the end of the cap iron This is more important than many people think. It helps with the breaking of the chip.

Check and fix the cap iron if needed. The cap iron must have good contatact with the iron. Any gap at all will collect chips, and clog. Make sure its clean and tight. It should be re-rusted by now with whatever you decided (if it needed it), or you can just wire brush it. I go into more detail here.

Flatten the frog. File the frog flat. I lock it in a vise and hold the file flat while filing it. It doesn't need to be perfect. Some like to polish this as well, but its not really necessary.

Hand Wood Finger Bumper Thumb




here is the aluminum frog flattened. The aluminum actually took a lot to flatten, but flatten quickly because …... well,.......its aluminum. I'm also not thrilled with the amount of contact area on the Blue frog, but in the end, it did work reasonably well.

Musical instrument Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory String instrument accessory Wood


Check the frog seating
Also check the frog seating. I very seldom have to do this on a vintage plane, but once in a while one does not seat properly. You can use valve grinding compound and usually it doesn't take much. In my latest restore I used a block of wood and sand paper.

Automotive lighting Sleeve Purple Motor vehicle Denim


Water Wood Paint Grey Rectangle


The best way to tell if it needs seating is as your tightening the screws, or just force the frog down on the seat. You should feel no rocking. You can also use some machinist blue to ensure you're getting good contact with the two parts.

Next flatten the sole. Use a piece of granite or a table saw top. If it proves to be real bad, I'll start it on the belt sander, like I do the sides, but I always finish it on the flatter surface of the table saw. Turn the plane front and push in all directions to keep it flat and even.

For longer planes, use sand paper from a role or cut a belt for the task.

Note, I've found the older the plane, the less flattening it'll need. You'd think just the opposite would be true with advancements in manufacturing, but anything made after the 60's usually makes it to the belt sander. The Blue stanley took longer than most I've ever done.

Vehicle door Gas Automotive lighting Gadget Bumper


Purple Wood Audio equipment Flooring Gas


Wood Automotive lighting Flooring Rectangle Floor


As I'm putting everything together I give it a coat of Fluid Film to keep the rust away.
Plane Block plane Wood Tin can Rebate plane


Or Wax it
Brown Wood Hardwood Metal Circle


The knob and Tote

You will decide how much the knob and tote needs but here are a few tricks to help.

I chuck the knob in the drill press.

Wood Floor Flooring Lamp Gas


Grind the head so it fits in the hole (were possible). Put a washer on the bottom of the knob.



I use a bolt with a 1/4" Philips head that's been ground down slightly so it fits inside the knob where the brass nut goes. Tighten it down with a washer and chuck it in the drill press. Only chuck it hand tight so you don't trash the threads.



Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Gas


Sand it with 60 grit if it still has a varnish or hard finish. then up through 500 (or more if desired) grit. If it had an oil finish I'll start with 220 grit. First few coats of BLO goes on with steel wool while in the drill press. If the existing finish is hard, it is usually easier to scrape it first.

This also helps with waxing. You can spin it fast enough in a drill press to heat the wax.

For the tote, I haven't found an easier way than possibly scraping if its a hard finish, and sanding as you would any other piece of wood.

Finish the wood with boiled linseed oil (BLO). If its a really dry old piece, soak it in the BLO overnight.

Troubleshooting.

If the mouth is to wide, its pretty hard to fix. You can slide the frog ahead just so far. If its still to wide, you have a couple of options.
1. Turn the plane into a jack
2. Buy a thicker iron.
3. Make it a paper weight.

I've test with shimming and haven't had a whole lot of luck.

Chatter
1. make sure its sharp
2. make sure your not taking to big of a bite. Thin down the shavings.
3. check the frog for both flatness, make sure the screws are tight, and make sure its seating well.
4. Don't go buy a thicker iron thinking it will fix it.

Then enjoy the results
Plane Smoothing plane Shoulder plane Hand tool Wood


I hope it helps and thanks for stopping by.

dw
Bought a #4 Stanley just like this one for $5.00 at a flea market. Did the restore based on this post. The plane cleaned up quite nicely and after some tweeking and honing it makes some decent ribbons. Ironically the sole is nearly dead flat. I didn't have to do anything but polish and wax it. Thought the blue paint was ugly so I stripped it and painted it flat black using rustoleum oil base paint then clear coated it with semi gloss clear coat. Now it looks more like a Stanley plane. "LOL"!
Going to send this one to my eldest son in Texas.
Plane Bicycle part Automotive design Shoulder plane Composite material
 

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Discussion Starter · #140 ·
Tuning it up Bench plane style

I brought this magnificent (note the dripping sarcasm) piece of machinery home with me during one of my flea market outings. This is a late model Stanley #4. Its painted Blue, made in the US, has a painted cap, a shorter iron than vintage, and no toe on the tote. The knob and tote is painted black, it has an aluminum frog and a pretty cheezy lateral adjuster.

Now….why anyone but someone with a sickness for hand planes like me would buy this plane is a little beyond my understanding, unless it was given to you or almost given to you. A note, I'd rather have one of these than any handyman though, and I'd put them in a pretty close running with a Defiance line hand plane. Again, the Defiance can be made to work well pretty consistently, but it takes a little more love than a Stanley Bailey vintage or equivalent.

For clean up see http://lumberjocks.com/replies/612946

So the following is some advice on how to make almost any plane work well. I'll try to separate out my experience in the differences between these and vintage plane.

Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Jack plane


Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Block plane Shoe


If your plane needs a full restoration, as in stripping, painting, and parts replaced, go to either my restoration blog , Making a tote blog, turning a knob blog, or a list of possible places to find parts.

Sharpen it
So here is what you do. First sharpen it. See parts 7 and 10 It doesn't matter what your taste in sharpening is as long as it works for you. It MUST be sharp.

Polish the end of the cap iron
Polish the end of the cap iron This is more important than many people think. It helps with the breaking of the chip.

Check and fix the cap iron if needed. The cap iron must have good contatact with the iron. Any gap at all will collect chips, and clog. Make sure its clean and tight. It should be re-rusted by now with whatever you decided (if it needed it), or you can just wire brush it. I go into more detail here.

Flatten the frog. File the frog flat. I lock it in a vise and hold the file flat while filing it. It doesn't need to be perfect. Some like to polish this as well, but its not really necessary.

Hand Wood Finger Bumper Thumb




here is the aluminum frog flattened. The aluminum actually took a lot to flatten, but flatten quickly because …... well,.......its aluminum. I'm also not thrilled with the amount of contact area on the Blue frog, but in the end, it did work reasonably well.

Musical instrument Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory String instrument accessory Wood


Check the frog seating
Also check the frog seating. I very seldom have to do this on a vintage plane, but once in a while one does not seat properly. You can use valve grinding compound and usually it doesn't take much. In my latest restore I used a block of wood and sand paper.

Automotive lighting Sleeve Purple Motor vehicle Denim


Water Wood Paint Grey Rectangle


The best way to tell if it needs seating is as your tightening the screws, or just force the frog down on the seat. You should feel no rocking. You can also use some machinist blue to ensure you're getting good contact with the two parts.

Next flatten the sole. Use a piece of granite or a table saw top. If it proves to be real bad, I'll start it on the belt sander, like I do the sides, but I always finish it on the flatter surface of the table saw. Turn the plane front and push in all directions to keep it flat and even.

For longer planes, use sand paper from a role or cut a belt for the task.

Note, I've found the older the plane, the less flattening it'll need. You'd think just the opposite would be true with advancements in manufacturing, but anything made after the 60's usually makes it to the belt sander. The Blue stanley took longer than most I've ever done.

Vehicle door Gas Automotive lighting Gadget Bumper


Purple Wood Audio equipment Flooring Gas


Wood Automotive lighting Flooring Rectangle Floor


As I'm putting everything together I give it a coat of Fluid Film to keep the rust away.
Plane Block plane Wood Tin can Rebate plane


Or Wax it
Brown Wood Hardwood Metal Circle


The knob and Tote

You will decide how much the knob and tote needs but here are a few tricks to help.

I chuck the knob in the drill press.

Wood Floor Flooring Lamp Gas


Grind the head so it fits in the hole (were possible). Put a washer on the bottom of the knob.



I use a bolt with a 1/4" Philips head that's been ground down slightly so it fits inside the knob where the brass nut goes. Tighten it down with a washer and chuck it in the drill press. Only chuck it hand tight so you don't trash the threads.



Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Gas


Sand it with 60 grit if it still has a varnish or hard finish. then up through 500 (or more if desired) grit. If it had an oil finish I'll start with 220 grit. First few coats of BLO goes on with steel wool while in the drill press. If the existing finish is hard, it is usually easier to scrape it first.

This also helps with waxing. You can spin it fast enough in a drill press to heat the wax.

For the tote, I haven't found an easier way than possibly scraping if its a hard finish, and sanding as you would any other piece of wood.

Finish the wood with boiled linseed oil (BLO). If its a really dry old piece, soak it in the BLO overnight.

Troubleshooting.

If the mouth is to wide, its pretty hard to fix. You can slide the frog ahead just so far. If its still to wide, you have a couple of options.
1. Turn the plane into a jack
2. Buy a thicker iron.
3. Make it a paper weight.

I've test with shimming and haven't had a whole lot of luck.

Chatter
1. make sure its sharp
2. make sure your not taking to big of a bite. Thin down the shavings.
3. check the frog for both flatness, make sure the screws are tight, and make sure its seating well.
4. Don't go buy a thicker iron thinking it will fix it.

Then enjoy the results
Plane Smoothing plane Shoulder plane Hand tool Wood


I hope it helps and thanks for stopping by.

dw
Nice job ross
 

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