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10,319 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
 

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Registered
Joined
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14,490 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
Wow … that's some beautiful lumber. Very thoughtful tip on the material utilization.
 

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Registered
Joined
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118,619 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
Good use of material Gary I look forward to more on your Pie crust. I've started my first pie crust also I thought I would give it a go in poplar first then fallow up with a more suitable figured wood on my second one.
 

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Joined
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11,233 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
A very logical way to approach the problem of getting the Mostest out of what you have…

Very good!

How are you going to cut the Special edge sections on the top?

Look like a very nice project…

Will be nice watching the blow-by-blow building process…

Thank you…
 

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Registered
Joined
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11,233 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
heirloomJim,

Did you prepare a 1/4 Pattern and Route it with a router Four times?

If not, how?

Gary, how are you going to attack it?
 

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Registered
Joined
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9,466 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
Man…do a Norm show..take us thru step by step. I'd watch the whole thing. Looking forward to the end results.
 

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Registered
Joined
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8,740 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
very good use of lumber
 

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Premium Member
Joined
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25,671 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
Good move, More than one way to skin a cat :)) Guess I'll have to buddy you to keep track of this. I saw one of these just the other day and thought it would be kool do to!
 

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Registered
Joined
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2,220 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
The ability to see a few steps ahead serves you well. This is a great example of the value of planning your cuts.
 

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Registered
Joined
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35,383 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
Gary: A great way to increase the length of your boards.

Nice job.
 

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Registered
Joined
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1,318 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
Gary,

I have to agree with everyone else very nice tip about making longer boards for circles. Looking forward to your progress on this project.
 

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Registered
Joined
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13,709 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
Gary,

Great to see you you have been able to find some time to get back into the workshop! Looking forward to seeing how you handle the legs/feet on this table!!

Lew
 

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Registered
Joined
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95 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
Gary,
Thanks for posting the idea. I've run into this problem before and I think this is just CLEVER!

Love it!

Charlie Mullins
 

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Registered
Joined
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1,764 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
As always Gary you astound us with your skill and as gary said please do a step by step blog i would love to see this through to the finish

Andy
 

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10,319 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
Joe - I have no idea how I am going to do a particular thing until I get there. We'll just have to find out together.

Thank you all for your kind comments.
 

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Registered
Joined
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8,861 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
A board stretcher! "Unique".

I did something similar to this once for a curved bed headboard.
 

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Registered
Joined
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1,020 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
I love seeing the collection of PC routers. I was feeling a bit guilty about wanting another, smaller one to go with the 7518 I have in my table. Now I have some justification. I can blame it on you :)

Did you use any extra internal support at the glue-lines, like pegs or biscuits? I like the circle technique, too. I'm always disappointed to lose the corners, but this reclaims some, and gives a bigger piece. I could have made my lazy susan a bit bigger. It was 5 equal-length pieces cut from the same board.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
Gary - It was long grain to long grain so I didn't use anything else. Those are 6 of my 7 PC routers. My 7518 stays permanently in my router table. My 7539 usually goes in my Legacy mill.

I have three 690's. It's real nice to have them set up for different things all the time.
 

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Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
Makes sense, Gary. I absolutely love when I have a tool already set up from some previous day's operations. I think probably 80% of my time in the shop is setting up for a cut that takes 30 seconds. That's why I want to do a few multiple-run projects, where I make, say, 10 of something. Set up for 10 minutes, then run 10 boards through, then set up again. It's not much more work to make 5 or 10 of something than it is to make 1 of something, unless it's very intricate, or hand tool based, e.g. hand dovetailing, or planing work.

And of course, the other 80% of my time is spent in cleanup, so I usually let that slide, and the place gets messier and messier.
 

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Joined
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25,671 Posts
Starting with the top.

Here starts something I always wanted to make. A pie crust table. This picture will give you an idea of what it will look like.
.


.
.
Now mine will have a top that looks like this one, but I plan on doing something different for the legs. I will be unique. It's something that just came to me.
.
.

Lets start with the top. I had the perfect piece of 6/4 mahogany that I have been saving for this. The problem is that it was a little too short for the diameter top I wanted to make.

Here is a way to get more from your lumber.

Suppose you are using one piece of lumber to make a round table top, and you want as big a diameter as you can get.

Lets take 3 pieces my example. You could divide the length by 3 and make your cuts. That would work but you are wasting wood. I wanted a 34" diameter top but my lumber was only 97". About 5" short if I were to cut 3 equal pieces

Look at the following example:
.
.


Notice that the center piece is longer than the side pieces. What I did was to mark the center of the piece of lumber and draw a 34" circle. Cutting the pieces apart following the diameter of the circle allows the lenght to overlap making my effective length longer.

Look at how much wood I would have wasted making a straight cut:
.
.


.
.

Now look how much extra lenght I gain. More than the 5" I needed.
.
.

.
.
Here they are glued up. I just use my bench for a flat surface with pieces of wax paper to keep the glue off the bench. I let the squeezed out glue dry completely and scrape it off.
In the background you can see part of my collection of PC routers.
.
.
Our local PBS station runs Norm and Roy; New Yankee & Woodwright on Saturday afternoons. Comparing the technique of a power tool for every move vs. hand tools, I think it is a bit comical at times because Roy would be done before Norm gets setup :))
 
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