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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Photographing long or tall projects.

Since a lot of us produce "longer", or taller, items that we want to post on LJ's, we typically end up having to take the photo from a distance so that the entire object can be included. The resulting photo ends up not showing the finer details of your work.
This type of scenario applies to some of my own pieces, such as carved walking staffs, or canes, but there is a free tool to help us get around this problem, and I expect that it is already installed on your PC with either Windows 7 or 8.
Effectively, we will be looking at creating a "Panoramic" view of your project so that you can show it from end to end, (or top to bottom), complete with the details. Once you get the process working for you, you will also be able to use it for vacation photos and nature scenes . . . but let's get to it.

First, take a series of 2 or more photos that overlap, and copy them to a suitable folder on your PC. The series can be horizontal or vertical, but the overlap areas need to have matching details so that the software can match the photos correctly. Don't worry if the series of photos are slightly different in exposure, you will adjust that later.
You also don't need to worry about your originals. They will remain untouched since the resulting Panoramic photo will be a totally new file.

Step 1 - Using your File Explorer, go to the folder where you have saved your photos, and double-click on the first photo in the series that will be used for the Panorama. This example uses 2 photos.
Product Font Rectangle Screenshot Electronic device


Step 2 - The photo should open in the Windows Photo Viewer.
Sky Tree Plant Font Biome


Go to the "Open" control on the menu bar, and select "Photo Gallery".
Product Rectangle Font World Terrestrial plant


Step 3 - When your image opens in Photo Gallery, click on the "Edit, organize, or share" on the menu bar.
Property Photograph Product Plant Tree


The next view will show you all of the photos in the folder where your series was saved, and you can select the ones that you want to include in the Panorama.

Step 4 - As you pause your mouse cursor over each photo, you will see a checkbox appear next to the top left corner of the photo. Click the checkbox to select the photo, and repeat this for each of the photos in the series. It doesn't matter what order you select them in, the software seems to sort them out correctly.
Rectangle Font Line Screenshot Technology


Step 5 - Once you have selected all of the photos in the series (I'm only using 2 in this example), click on "Create" on the menu bar, then click on "Panorama" and you will see a progress bar as the Panorama is created.
Product Rectangle Organism Font Slope


Step 6 - If the software has problems matching your photos you will see a message appear, but you should normally get a "Save" screen where you can name the Panorama, and also decide which folder you want to save it in (the default folder will be the same one that the original photos are in).
Product Font Screenshot Software Technology


Step 7a - You will now see the Panorama, but there will usually be black sections around the border as shown below. To eliminate these, Click on the "Crop" button, and you will see a superimposed grid (shown below). Use the "handles" at the corners of the grid to drag it to cover as much of the Panorama as possible, while leaving out the black areas as shown in the second photo below. Once you are satisfied with the area covered by the grid, click the "Crop" button once more, and you will see the cropped photo.
Photograph Light Product Car Plant


Plant Car Vehicle Window Sky


Step 7b - If you are happy with the resulting photo, click on the "Close file" button to save your Panorama, and return to the Photo Gallery.
Car Plant Vehicle Tire Wheel


The next posting will cover how to make further adjustments to your Panorama, such as brightness or contrast, straightening, and resizing.

Hope this is of interest.
Best regards.
 

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Photographing long or tall projects.

Since a lot of us produce "longer", or taller, items that we want to post on LJ's, we typically end up having to take the photo from a distance so that the entire object can be included. The resulting photo ends up not showing the finer details of your work.
This type of scenario applies to some of my own pieces, such as carved walking staffs, or canes, but there is a free tool to help us get around this problem, and I expect that it is already installed on your PC with either Windows 7 or 8.
Effectively, we will be looking at creating a "Panoramic" view of your project so that you can show it from end to end, (or top to bottom), complete with the details. Once you get the process working for you, you will also be able to use it for vacation photos and nature scenes . . . but let's get to it.

First, take a series of 2 or more photos that overlap, and copy them to a suitable folder on your PC. The series can be horizontal or vertical, but the overlap areas need to have matching details so that the software can match the photos correctly. Don't worry if the series of photos are slightly different in exposure, you will adjust that later.
You also don't need to worry about your originals. They will remain untouched since the resulting Panoramic photo will be a totally new file.

Step 1 - Using your File Explorer, go to the folder where you have saved your photos, and double-click on the first photo in the series that will be used for the Panorama. This example uses 2 photos.
Product Font Rectangle Screenshot Electronic device


Step 2 - The photo should open in the Windows Photo Viewer.
Sky Tree Plant Font Biome


Go to the "Open" control on the menu bar, and select "Photo Gallery".
Product Rectangle Font World Terrestrial plant


Step 3 - When your image opens in Photo Gallery, click on the "Edit, organize, or share" on the menu bar.
Property Photograph Product Plant Tree


The next view will show you all of the photos in the folder where your series was saved, and you can select the ones that you want to include in the Panorama.

Step 4 - As you pause your mouse cursor over each photo, you will see a checkbox appear next to the top left corner of the photo. Click the checkbox to select the photo, and repeat this for each of the photos in the series. It doesn't matter what order you select them in, the software seems to sort them out correctly.
Rectangle Font Line Screenshot Technology


Step 5 - Once you have selected all of the photos in the series (I'm only using 2 in this example), click on "Create" on the menu bar, then click on "Panorama" and you will see a progress bar as the Panorama is created.
Product Rectangle Organism Font Slope


Step 6 - If the software has problems matching your photos you will see a message appear, but you should normally get a "Save" screen where you can name the Panorama, and also decide which folder you want to save it in (the default folder will be the same one that the original photos are in).
Product Font Screenshot Software Technology


Step 7a - You will now see the Panorama, but there will usually be black sections around the border as shown below. To eliminate these, Click on the "Crop" button, and you will see a superimposed grid (shown below). Use the "handles" at the corners of the grid to drag it to cover as much of the Panorama as possible, while leaving out the black areas as shown in the second photo below. Once you are satisfied with the area covered by the grid, click the "Crop" button once more, and you will see the cropped photo.
Photograph Light Product Car Plant


Plant Car Vehicle Window Sky


Step 7b - If you are happy with the resulting photo, click on the "Close file" button to save your Panorama, and return to the Photo Gallery.
Car Plant Vehicle Tire Wheel


The next posting will cover how to make further adjustments to your Panorama, such as brightness or contrast, straightening, and resizing.

Hope this is of interest.
Best regards.
Hi John,
I used dedicated panorama software in the past but never knew that there was a provided tool in Windows for this. I can see this being useful in a pinch.
Thank you.
 

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7,831 Posts
Photographing long or tall projects.

Since a lot of us produce "longer", or taller, items that we want to post on LJ's, we typically end up having to take the photo from a distance so that the entire object can be included. The resulting photo ends up not showing the finer details of your work.
This type of scenario applies to some of my own pieces, such as carved walking staffs, or canes, but there is a free tool to help us get around this problem, and I expect that it is already installed on your PC with either Windows 7 or 8.
Effectively, we will be looking at creating a "Panoramic" view of your project so that you can show it from end to end, (or top to bottom), complete with the details. Once you get the process working for you, you will also be able to use it for vacation photos and nature scenes . . . but let's get to it.

First, take a series of 2 or more photos that overlap, and copy them to a suitable folder on your PC. The series can be horizontal or vertical, but the overlap areas need to have matching details so that the software can match the photos correctly. Don't worry if the series of photos are slightly different in exposure, you will adjust that later.
You also don't need to worry about your originals. They will remain untouched since the resulting Panoramic photo will be a totally new file.

Step 1 - Using your File Explorer, go to the folder where you have saved your photos, and double-click on the first photo in the series that will be used for the Panorama. This example uses 2 photos.
Product Font Rectangle Screenshot Electronic device


Step 2 - The photo should open in the Windows Photo Viewer.
Sky Tree Plant Font Biome


Go to the "Open" control on the menu bar, and select "Photo Gallery".
Product Rectangle Font World Terrestrial plant


Step 3 - When your image opens in Photo Gallery, click on the "Edit, organize, or share" on the menu bar.
Property Photograph Product Plant Tree


The next view will show you all of the photos in the folder where your series was saved, and you can select the ones that you want to include in the Panorama.

Step 4 - As you pause your mouse cursor over each photo, you will see a checkbox appear next to the top left corner of the photo. Click the checkbox to select the photo, and repeat this for each of the photos in the series. It doesn't matter what order you select them in, the software seems to sort them out correctly.
Rectangle Font Line Screenshot Technology


Step 5 - Once you have selected all of the photos in the series (I'm only using 2 in this example), click on "Create" on the menu bar, then click on "Panorama" and you will see a progress bar as the Panorama is created.
Product Rectangle Organism Font Slope


Step 6 - If the software has problems matching your photos you will see a message appear, but you should normally get a "Save" screen where you can name the Panorama, and also decide which folder you want to save it in (the default folder will be the same one that the original photos are in).
Product Font Screenshot Software Technology


Step 7a - You will now see the Panorama, but there will usually be black sections around the border as shown below. To eliminate these, Click on the "Crop" button, and you will see a superimposed grid (shown below). Use the "handles" at the corners of the grid to drag it to cover as much of the Panorama as possible, while leaving out the black areas as shown in the second photo below. Once you are satisfied with the area covered by the grid, click the "Crop" button once more, and you will see the cropped photo.
Photograph Light Product Car Plant


Plant Car Vehicle Window Sky


Step 7b - If you are happy with the resulting photo, click on the "Close file" button to save your Panorama, and return to the Photo Gallery.
Car Plant Vehicle Tire Wheel


The next posting will cover how to make further adjustments to your Panorama, such as brightness or contrast, straightening, and resizing.

Hope this is of interest.
Best regards.
Thanks John!
 

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13,709 Posts
Photographing long or tall projects.

Since a lot of us produce "longer", or taller, items that we want to post on LJ's, we typically end up having to take the photo from a distance so that the entire object can be included. The resulting photo ends up not showing the finer details of your work.
This type of scenario applies to some of my own pieces, such as carved walking staffs, or canes, but there is a free tool to help us get around this problem, and I expect that it is already installed on your PC with either Windows 7 or 8.
Effectively, we will be looking at creating a "Panoramic" view of your project so that you can show it from end to end, (or top to bottom), complete with the details. Once you get the process working for you, you will also be able to use it for vacation photos and nature scenes . . . but let's get to it.

First, take a series of 2 or more photos that overlap, and copy them to a suitable folder on your PC. The series can be horizontal or vertical, but the overlap areas need to have matching details so that the software can match the photos correctly. Don't worry if the series of photos are slightly different in exposure, you will adjust that later.
You also don't need to worry about your originals. They will remain untouched since the resulting Panoramic photo will be a totally new file.

Step 1 - Using your File Explorer, go to the folder where you have saved your photos, and double-click on the first photo in the series that will be used for the Panorama. This example uses 2 photos.
Product Font Rectangle Screenshot Electronic device


Step 2 - The photo should open in the Windows Photo Viewer.
Sky Tree Plant Font Biome


Go to the "Open" control on the menu bar, and select "Photo Gallery".
Product Rectangle Font World Terrestrial plant


Step 3 - When your image opens in Photo Gallery, click on the "Edit, organize, or share" on the menu bar.
Property Photograph Product Plant Tree


The next view will show you all of the photos in the folder where your series was saved, and you can select the ones that you want to include in the Panorama.

Step 4 - As you pause your mouse cursor over each photo, you will see a checkbox appear next to the top left corner of the photo. Click the checkbox to select the photo, and repeat this for each of the photos in the series. It doesn't matter what order you select them in, the software seems to sort them out correctly.
Rectangle Font Line Screenshot Technology


Step 5 - Once you have selected all of the photos in the series (I'm only using 2 in this example), click on "Create" on the menu bar, then click on "Panorama" and you will see a progress bar as the Panorama is created.
Product Rectangle Organism Font Slope


Step 6 - If the software has problems matching your photos you will see a message appear, but you should normally get a "Save" screen where you can name the Panorama, and also decide which folder you want to save it in (the default folder will be the same one that the original photos are in).
Product Font Screenshot Software Technology


Step 7a - You will now see the Panorama, but there will usually be black sections around the border as shown below. To eliminate these, Click on the "Crop" button, and you will see a superimposed grid (shown below). Use the "handles" at the corners of the grid to drag it to cover as much of the Panorama as possible, while leaving out the black areas as shown in the second photo below. Once you are satisfied with the area covered by the grid, click the "Crop" button once more, and you will see the cropped photo.
Photograph Light Product Car Plant


Plant Car Vehicle Window Sky


Step 7b - If you are happy with the resulting photo, click on the "Close file" button to save your Panorama, and return to the Photo Gallery.
Car Plant Vehicle Tire Wheel


The next posting will cover how to make further adjustments to your Panorama, such as brightness or contrast, straightening, and resizing.

Hope this is of interest.
Best regards.
Thanks, John. This is really cool!
 

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17,103 Posts
Photographing long or tall projects.

Since a lot of us produce "longer", or taller, items that we want to post on LJ's, we typically end up having to take the photo from a distance so that the entire object can be included. The resulting photo ends up not showing the finer details of your work.
This type of scenario applies to some of my own pieces, such as carved walking staffs, or canes, but there is a free tool to help us get around this problem, and I expect that it is already installed on your PC with either Windows 7 or 8.
Effectively, we will be looking at creating a "Panoramic" view of your project so that you can show it from end to end, (or top to bottom), complete with the details. Once you get the process working for you, you will also be able to use it for vacation photos and nature scenes . . . but let's get to it.

First, take a series of 2 or more photos that overlap, and copy them to a suitable folder on your PC. The series can be horizontal or vertical, but the overlap areas need to have matching details so that the software can match the photos correctly. Don't worry if the series of photos are slightly different in exposure, you will adjust that later.
You also don't need to worry about your originals. They will remain untouched since the resulting Panoramic photo will be a totally new file.

Step 1 - Using your File Explorer, go to the folder where you have saved your photos, and double-click on the first photo in the series that will be used for the Panorama. This example uses 2 photos.
Product Font Rectangle Screenshot Electronic device


Step 2 - The photo should open in the Windows Photo Viewer.
Sky Tree Plant Font Biome


Go to the "Open" control on the menu bar, and select "Photo Gallery".
Product Rectangle Font World Terrestrial plant


Step 3 - When your image opens in Photo Gallery, click on the "Edit, organize, or share" on the menu bar.
Property Photograph Product Plant Tree


The next view will show you all of the photos in the folder where your series was saved, and you can select the ones that you want to include in the Panorama.

Step 4 - As you pause your mouse cursor over each photo, you will see a checkbox appear next to the top left corner of the photo. Click the checkbox to select the photo, and repeat this for each of the photos in the series. It doesn't matter what order you select them in, the software seems to sort them out correctly.
Rectangle Font Line Screenshot Technology


Step 5 - Once you have selected all of the photos in the series (I'm only using 2 in this example), click on "Create" on the menu bar, then click on "Panorama" and you will see a progress bar as the Panorama is created.
Product Rectangle Organism Font Slope


Step 6 - If the software has problems matching your photos you will see a message appear, but you should normally get a "Save" screen where you can name the Panorama, and also decide which folder you want to save it in (the default folder will be the same one that the original photos are in).
Product Font Screenshot Software Technology


Step 7a - You will now see the Panorama, but there will usually be black sections around the border as shown below. To eliminate these, Click on the "Crop" button, and you will see a superimposed grid (shown below). Use the "handles" at the corners of the grid to drag it to cover as much of the Panorama as possible, while leaving out the black areas as shown in the second photo below. Once you are satisfied with the area covered by the grid, click the "Crop" button once more, and you will see the cropped photo.
Photograph Light Product Car Plant


Plant Car Vehicle Window Sky


Step 7b - If you are happy with the resulting photo, click on the "Close file" button to save your Panorama, and return to the Photo Gallery.
Car Plant Vehicle Tire Wheel


The next posting will cover how to make further adjustments to your Panorama, such as brightness or contrast, straightening, and resizing.

Hope this is of interest.
Best regards.
This is a great feature John. Thanks for making us aware of it and also showing how to use it. I wonder if there is something similar in my MAC?
 

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Registered
Joined
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17,103 Posts
Photographing long or tall projects.

Since a lot of us produce "longer", or taller, items that we want to post on LJ's, we typically end up having to take the photo from a distance so that the entire object can be included. The resulting photo ends up not showing the finer details of your work.
This type of scenario applies to some of my own pieces, such as carved walking staffs, or canes, but there is a free tool to help us get around this problem, and I expect that it is already installed on your PC with either Windows 7 or 8.
Effectively, we will be looking at creating a "Panoramic" view of your project so that you can show it from end to end, (or top to bottom), complete with the details. Once you get the process working for you, you will also be able to use it for vacation photos and nature scenes . . . but let's get to it.

First, take a series of 2 or more photos that overlap, and copy them to a suitable folder on your PC. The series can be horizontal or vertical, but the overlap areas need to have matching details so that the software can match the photos correctly. Don't worry if the series of photos are slightly different in exposure, you will adjust that later.
You also don't need to worry about your originals. They will remain untouched since the resulting Panoramic photo will be a totally new file.

Step 1 - Using your File Explorer, go to the folder where you have saved your photos, and double-click on the first photo in the series that will be used for the Panorama. This example uses 2 photos.
Product Font Rectangle Screenshot Electronic device


Step 2 - The photo should open in the Windows Photo Viewer.
Sky Tree Plant Font Biome


Go to the "Open" control on the menu bar, and select "Photo Gallery".
Product Rectangle Font World Terrestrial plant


Step 3 - When your image opens in Photo Gallery, click on the "Edit, organize, or share" on the menu bar.
Property Photograph Product Plant Tree


The next view will show you all of the photos in the folder where your series was saved, and you can select the ones that you want to include in the Panorama.

Step 4 - As you pause your mouse cursor over each photo, you will see a checkbox appear next to the top left corner of the photo. Click the checkbox to select the photo, and repeat this for each of the photos in the series. It doesn't matter what order you select them in, the software seems to sort them out correctly.
Rectangle Font Line Screenshot Technology


Step 5 - Once you have selected all of the photos in the series (I'm only using 2 in this example), click on "Create" on the menu bar, then click on "Panorama" and you will see a progress bar as the Panorama is created.
Product Rectangle Organism Font Slope


Step 6 - If the software has problems matching your photos you will see a message appear, but you should normally get a "Save" screen where you can name the Panorama, and also decide which folder you want to save it in (the default folder will be the same one that the original photos are in).
Product Font Screenshot Software Technology


Step 7a - You will now see the Panorama, but there will usually be black sections around the border as shown below. To eliminate these, Click on the "Crop" button, and you will see a superimposed grid (shown below). Use the "handles" at the corners of the grid to drag it to cover as much of the Panorama as possible, while leaving out the black areas as shown in the second photo below. Once you are satisfied with the area covered by the grid, click the "Crop" button once more, and you will see the cropped photo.
Photograph Light Product Car Plant


Plant Car Vehicle Window Sky


Step 7b - If you are happy with the resulting photo, click on the "Close file" button to save your Panorama, and return to the Photo Gallery.
Car Plant Vehicle Tire Wheel


The next posting will cover how to make further adjustments to your Panorama, such as brightness or contrast, straightening, and resizing.

Hope this is of interest.
Best regards.
My grandson was visiting today and he showed me that I had a panorama feature on my Iphone. You just select pan, click to start taking the photo, moving the camera to shoot the scene, click when done and it gets uploaded automatically to the MAC photo gallery as a finished panoramic photo. Very cool and easy. Thanks much John for bringing this up in your post as I otherwise wouldn't have looked into it and found out that I had such a great feature available.
 

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9,248 Posts
Photographing long or tall projects.

Since a lot of us produce "longer", or taller, items that we want to post on LJ's, we typically end up having to take the photo from a distance so that the entire object can be included. The resulting photo ends up not showing the finer details of your work.
This type of scenario applies to some of my own pieces, such as carved walking staffs, or canes, but there is a free tool to help us get around this problem, and I expect that it is already installed on your PC with either Windows 7 or 8.
Effectively, we will be looking at creating a "Panoramic" view of your project so that you can show it from end to end, (or top to bottom), complete with the details. Once you get the process working for you, you will also be able to use it for vacation photos and nature scenes . . . but let's get to it.

First, take a series of 2 or more photos that overlap, and copy them to a suitable folder on your PC. The series can be horizontal or vertical, but the overlap areas need to have matching details so that the software can match the photos correctly. Don't worry if the series of photos are slightly different in exposure, you will adjust that later.
You also don't need to worry about your originals. They will remain untouched since the resulting Panoramic photo will be a totally new file.

Step 1 - Using your File Explorer, go to the folder where you have saved your photos, and double-click on the first photo in the series that will be used for the Panorama. This example uses 2 photos.
Product Font Rectangle Screenshot Electronic device


Step 2 - The photo should open in the Windows Photo Viewer.
Sky Tree Plant Font Biome


Go to the "Open" control on the menu bar, and select "Photo Gallery".
Product Rectangle Font World Terrestrial plant


Step 3 - When your image opens in Photo Gallery, click on the "Edit, organize, or share" on the menu bar.
Property Photograph Product Plant Tree


The next view will show you all of the photos in the folder where your series was saved, and you can select the ones that you want to include in the Panorama.

Step 4 - As you pause your mouse cursor over each photo, you will see a checkbox appear next to the top left corner of the photo. Click the checkbox to select the photo, and repeat this for each of the photos in the series. It doesn't matter what order you select them in, the software seems to sort them out correctly.
Rectangle Font Line Screenshot Technology


Step 5 - Once you have selected all of the photos in the series (I'm only using 2 in this example), click on "Create" on the menu bar, then click on "Panorama" and you will see a progress bar as the Panorama is created.
Product Rectangle Organism Font Slope


Step 6 - If the software has problems matching your photos you will see a message appear, but you should normally get a "Save" screen where you can name the Panorama, and also decide which folder you want to save it in (the default folder will be the same one that the original photos are in).
Product Font Screenshot Software Technology


Step 7a - You will now see the Panorama, but there will usually be black sections around the border as shown below. To eliminate these, Click on the "Crop" button, and you will see a superimposed grid (shown below). Use the "handles" at the corners of the grid to drag it to cover as much of the Panorama as possible, while leaving out the black areas as shown in the second photo below. Once you are satisfied with the area covered by the grid, click the "Crop" button once more, and you will see the cropped photo.
Photograph Light Product Car Plant


Plant Car Vehicle Window Sky


Step 7b - If you are happy with the resulting photo, click on the "Close file" button to save your Panorama, and return to the Photo Gallery.
Car Plant Vehicle Tire Wheel


The next posting will cover how to make further adjustments to your Panorama, such as brightness or contrast, straightening, and resizing.

Hope this is of interest.
Best regards.
Very good information! :) Thank you!

Sheila
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Photographing long or tall projects.

Since a lot of us produce "longer", or taller, items that we want to post on LJ's, we typically end up having to take the photo from a distance so that the entire object can be included. The resulting photo ends up not showing the finer details of your work.
This type of scenario applies to some of my own pieces, such as carved walking staffs, or canes, but there is a free tool to help us get around this problem, and I expect that it is already installed on your PC with either Windows 7 or 8.
Effectively, we will be looking at creating a "Panoramic" view of your project so that you can show it from end to end, (or top to bottom), complete with the details. Once you get the process working for you, you will also be able to use it for vacation photos and nature scenes . . . but let's get to it.

First, take a series of 2 or more photos that overlap, and copy them to a suitable folder on your PC. The series can be horizontal or vertical, but the overlap areas need to have matching details so that the software can match the photos correctly. Don't worry if the series of photos are slightly different in exposure, you will adjust that later.
You also don't need to worry about your originals. They will remain untouched since the resulting Panoramic photo will be a totally new file.

Step 1 - Using your File Explorer, go to the folder where you have saved your photos, and double-click on the first photo in the series that will be used for the Panorama. This example uses 2 photos.
Product Font Rectangle Screenshot Electronic device


Step 2 - The photo should open in the Windows Photo Viewer.
Sky Tree Plant Font Biome


Go to the "Open" control on the menu bar, and select "Photo Gallery".
Product Rectangle Font World Terrestrial plant


Step 3 - When your image opens in Photo Gallery, click on the "Edit, organize, or share" on the menu bar.
Property Photograph Product Plant Tree


The next view will show you all of the photos in the folder where your series was saved, and you can select the ones that you want to include in the Panorama.

Step 4 - As you pause your mouse cursor over each photo, you will see a checkbox appear next to the top left corner of the photo. Click the checkbox to select the photo, and repeat this for each of the photos in the series. It doesn't matter what order you select them in, the software seems to sort them out correctly.
Rectangle Font Line Screenshot Technology


Step 5 - Once you have selected all of the photos in the series (I'm only using 2 in this example), click on "Create" on the menu bar, then click on "Panorama" and you will see a progress bar as the Panorama is created.
Product Rectangle Organism Font Slope


Step 6 - If the software has problems matching your photos you will see a message appear, but you should normally get a "Save" screen where you can name the Panorama, and also decide which folder you want to save it in (the default folder will be the same one that the original photos are in).
Product Font Screenshot Software Technology


Step 7a - You will now see the Panorama, but there will usually be black sections around the border as shown below. To eliminate these, Click on the "Crop" button, and you will see a superimposed grid (shown below). Use the "handles" at the corners of the grid to drag it to cover as much of the Panorama as possible, while leaving out the black areas as shown in the second photo below. Once you are satisfied with the area covered by the grid, click the "Crop" button once more, and you will see the cropped photo.
Photograph Light Product Car Plant


Plant Car Vehicle Window Sky


Step 7b - If you are happy with the resulting photo, click on the "Close file" button to save your Panorama, and return to the Photo Gallery.
Car Plant Vehicle Tire Wheel


The next posting will cover how to make further adjustments to your Panorama, such as brightness or contrast, straightening, and resizing.

Hope this is of interest.
Best regards.
Glad you all liked it.
The only time that I have had problems with this feature, is when I took about 7 photos for 1 Panoramic view. I selected all 7, and I got an error message saying that the Panorama could not be produced.
So, I selected the first 3 photos, and made them into a Panorama. Then I selected the next 3 photos, and made a second Panorama. I then made the second Panorama and the 7th photo into one photo so that I now had 2 Panoramas from my original 7 photos. Finally, I made my 2 Panoramas into one, and for some reason this multi-step process worked. For our purposes on LJ, I doubt that any of us will have projects that long.

I'll see about getting Part #2 posted soon.

Have a great Friday the 13th.
 

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Photographing long or tall projects.

Since a lot of us produce "longer", or taller, items that we want to post on LJ's, we typically end up having to take the photo from a distance so that the entire object can be included. The resulting photo ends up not showing the finer details of your work.
This type of scenario applies to some of my own pieces, such as carved walking staffs, or canes, but there is a free tool to help us get around this problem, and I expect that it is already installed on your PC with either Windows 7 or 8.
Effectively, we will be looking at creating a "Panoramic" view of your project so that you can show it from end to end, (or top to bottom), complete with the details. Once you get the process working for you, you will also be able to use it for vacation photos and nature scenes . . . but let's get to it.

First, take a series of 2 or more photos that overlap, and copy them to a suitable folder on your PC. The series can be horizontal or vertical, but the overlap areas need to have matching details so that the software can match the photos correctly. Don't worry if the series of photos are slightly different in exposure, you will adjust that later.
You also don't need to worry about your originals. They will remain untouched since the resulting Panoramic photo will be a totally new file.

Step 1 - Using your File Explorer, go to the folder where you have saved your photos, and double-click on the first photo in the series that will be used for the Panorama. This example uses 2 photos.
Product Font Rectangle Screenshot Electronic device


Step 2 - The photo should open in the Windows Photo Viewer.
Sky Tree Plant Font Biome


Go to the "Open" control on the menu bar, and select "Photo Gallery".
Product Rectangle Font World Terrestrial plant


Step 3 - When your image opens in Photo Gallery, click on the "Edit, organize, or share" on the menu bar.
Property Photograph Product Plant Tree


The next view will show you all of the photos in the folder where your series was saved, and you can select the ones that you want to include in the Panorama.

Step 4 - As you pause your mouse cursor over each photo, you will see a checkbox appear next to the top left corner of the photo. Click the checkbox to select the photo, and repeat this for each of the photos in the series. It doesn't matter what order you select them in, the software seems to sort them out correctly.
Rectangle Font Line Screenshot Technology


Step 5 - Once you have selected all of the photos in the series (I'm only using 2 in this example), click on "Create" on the menu bar, then click on "Panorama" and you will see a progress bar as the Panorama is created.
Product Rectangle Organism Font Slope


Step 6 - If the software has problems matching your photos you will see a message appear, but you should normally get a "Save" screen where you can name the Panorama, and also decide which folder you want to save it in (the default folder will be the same one that the original photos are in).
Product Font Screenshot Software Technology


Step 7a - You will now see the Panorama, but there will usually be black sections around the border as shown below. To eliminate these, Click on the "Crop" button, and you will see a superimposed grid (shown below). Use the "handles" at the corners of the grid to drag it to cover as much of the Panorama as possible, while leaving out the black areas as shown in the second photo below. Once you are satisfied with the area covered by the grid, click the "Crop" button once more, and you will see the cropped photo.
Photograph Light Product Car Plant


Plant Car Vehicle Window Sky


Step 7b - If you are happy with the resulting photo, click on the "Close file" button to save your Panorama, and return to the Photo Gallery.
Car Plant Vehicle Tire Wheel


The next posting will cover how to make further adjustments to your Panorama, such as brightness or contrast, straightening, and resizing.

Hope this is of interest.
Best regards.
Fine article John. As eluded to by others this feature is available on many cameras and phones but the image quality does not nearly match this method. I've done it with my Galaxy S4 and friends with their Iphones but neither are what I'd call print worthy. This works very well when images are taken from a proper camera, not knocking the camera features on the phones but they are what they are.
 

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Photographing long or tall projects.

Since a lot of us produce "longer", or taller, items that we want to post on LJ's, we typically end up having to take the photo from a distance so that the entire object can be included. The resulting photo ends up not showing the finer details of your work.
This type of scenario applies to some of my own pieces, such as carved walking staffs, or canes, but there is a free tool to help us get around this problem, and I expect that it is already installed on your PC with either Windows 7 or 8.
Effectively, we will be looking at creating a "Panoramic" view of your project so that you can show it from end to end, (or top to bottom), complete with the details. Once you get the process working for you, you will also be able to use it for vacation photos and nature scenes . . . but let's get to it.

First, take a series of 2 or more photos that overlap, and copy them to a suitable folder on your PC. The series can be horizontal or vertical, but the overlap areas need to have matching details so that the software can match the photos correctly. Don't worry if the series of photos are slightly different in exposure, you will adjust that later.
You also don't need to worry about your originals. They will remain untouched since the resulting Panoramic photo will be a totally new file.

Step 1 - Using your File Explorer, go to the folder where you have saved your photos, and double-click on the first photo in the series that will be used for the Panorama. This example uses 2 photos.
Product Font Rectangle Screenshot Electronic device


Step 2 - The photo should open in the Windows Photo Viewer.
Sky Tree Plant Font Biome


Go to the "Open" control on the menu bar, and select "Photo Gallery".
Product Rectangle Font World Terrestrial plant


Step 3 - When your image opens in Photo Gallery, click on the "Edit, organize, or share" on the menu bar.
Property Photograph Product Plant Tree


The next view will show you all of the photos in the folder where your series was saved, and you can select the ones that you want to include in the Panorama.

Step 4 - As you pause your mouse cursor over each photo, you will see a checkbox appear next to the top left corner of the photo. Click the checkbox to select the photo, and repeat this for each of the photos in the series. It doesn't matter what order you select them in, the software seems to sort them out correctly.
Rectangle Font Line Screenshot Technology


Step 5 - Once you have selected all of the photos in the series (I'm only using 2 in this example), click on "Create" on the menu bar, then click on "Panorama" and you will see a progress bar as the Panorama is created.
Product Rectangle Organism Font Slope


Step 6 - If the software has problems matching your photos you will see a message appear, but you should normally get a "Save" screen where you can name the Panorama, and also decide which folder you want to save it in (the default folder will be the same one that the original photos are in).
Product Font Screenshot Software Technology


Step 7a - You will now see the Panorama, but there will usually be black sections around the border as shown below. To eliminate these, Click on the "Crop" button, and you will see a superimposed grid (shown below). Use the "handles" at the corners of the grid to drag it to cover as much of the Panorama as possible, while leaving out the black areas as shown in the second photo below. Once you are satisfied with the area covered by the grid, click the "Crop" button once more, and you will see the cropped photo.
Photograph Light Product Car Plant


Plant Car Vehicle Window Sky


Step 7b - If you are happy with the resulting photo, click on the "Close file" button to save your Panorama, and return to the Photo Gallery.
Car Plant Vehicle Tire Wheel


The next posting will cover how to make further adjustments to your Panorama, such as brightness or contrast, straightening, and resizing.

Hope this is of interest.
Best regards.
Thanks, for taking the time to document and share this….

I think I will do some experimenting….
Finding a worthy subject could be the problem!!!
 

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Photographing long or tall projects.

Since a lot of us produce "longer", or taller, items that we want to post on LJ's, we typically end up having to take the photo from a distance so that the entire object can be included. The resulting photo ends up not showing the finer details of your work.
This type of scenario applies to some of my own pieces, such as carved walking staffs, or canes, but there is a free tool to help us get around this problem, and I expect that it is already installed on your PC with either Windows 7 or 8.
Effectively, we will be looking at creating a "Panoramic" view of your project so that you can show it from end to end, (or top to bottom), complete with the details. Once you get the process working for you, you will also be able to use it for vacation photos and nature scenes . . . but let's get to it.

First, take a series of 2 or more photos that overlap, and copy them to a suitable folder on your PC. The series can be horizontal or vertical, but the overlap areas need to have matching details so that the software can match the photos correctly. Don't worry if the series of photos are slightly different in exposure, you will adjust that later.
You also don't need to worry about your originals. They will remain untouched since the resulting Panoramic photo will be a totally new file.

Step 1 - Using your File Explorer, go to the folder where you have saved your photos, and double-click on the first photo in the series that will be used for the Panorama. This example uses 2 photos.
Product Font Rectangle Screenshot Electronic device


Step 2 - The photo should open in the Windows Photo Viewer.
Sky Tree Plant Font Biome


Go to the "Open" control on the menu bar, and select "Photo Gallery".
Product Rectangle Font World Terrestrial plant


Step 3 - When your image opens in Photo Gallery, click on the "Edit, organize, or share" on the menu bar.
Property Photograph Product Plant Tree


The next view will show you all of the photos in the folder where your series was saved, and you can select the ones that you want to include in the Panorama.

Step 4 - As you pause your mouse cursor over each photo, you will see a checkbox appear next to the top left corner of the photo. Click the checkbox to select the photo, and repeat this for each of the photos in the series. It doesn't matter what order you select them in, the software seems to sort them out correctly.
Rectangle Font Line Screenshot Technology


Step 5 - Once you have selected all of the photos in the series (I'm only using 2 in this example), click on "Create" on the menu bar, then click on "Panorama" and you will see a progress bar as the Panorama is created.
Product Rectangle Organism Font Slope


Step 6 - If the software has problems matching your photos you will see a message appear, but you should normally get a "Save" screen where you can name the Panorama, and also decide which folder you want to save it in (the default folder will be the same one that the original photos are in).
Product Font Screenshot Software Technology


Step 7a - You will now see the Panorama, but there will usually be black sections around the border as shown below. To eliminate these, Click on the "Crop" button, and you will see a superimposed grid (shown below). Use the "handles" at the corners of the grid to drag it to cover as much of the Panorama as possible, while leaving out the black areas as shown in the second photo below. Once you are satisfied with the area covered by the grid, click the "Crop" button once more, and you will see the cropped photo.
Photograph Light Product Car Plant


Plant Car Vehicle Window Sky


Step 7b - If you are happy with the resulting photo, click on the "Close file" button to save your Panorama, and return to the Photo Gallery.
Car Plant Vehicle Tire Wheel


The next posting will cover how to make further adjustments to your Panorama, such as brightness or contrast, straightening, and resizing.

Hope this is of interest.
Best regards.
I see Microsoft has just released a new version of "ICE" Image Composite Editor- which will also help with this. It can be downloaded from-

http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/downloads/69699e5a-5c91-4b01-898c-ef012cbb07f7/default.aspx
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Photographing long or tall projects.

Since a lot of us produce "longer", or taller, items that we want to post on LJ's, we typically end up having to take the photo from a distance so that the entire object can be included. The resulting photo ends up not showing the finer details of your work.
This type of scenario applies to some of my own pieces, such as carved walking staffs, or canes, but there is a free tool to help us get around this problem, and I expect that it is already installed on your PC with either Windows 7 or 8.
Effectively, we will be looking at creating a "Panoramic" view of your project so that you can show it from end to end, (or top to bottom), complete with the details. Once you get the process working for you, you will also be able to use it for vacation photos and nature scenes . . . but let's get to it.

First, take a series of 2 or more photos that overlap, and copy them to a suitable folder on your PC. The series can be horizontal or vertical, but the overlap areas need to have matching details so that the software can match the photos correctly. Don't worry if the series of photos are slightly different in exposure, you will adjust that later.
You also don't need to worry about your originals. They will remain untouched since the resulting Panoramic photo will be a totally new file.

Step 1 - Using your File Explorer, go to the folder where you have saved your photos, and double-click on the first photo in the series that will be used for the Panorama. This example uses 2 photos.
Product Font Rectangle Screenshot Electronic device


Step 2 - The photo should open in the Windows Photo Viewer.
Sky Tree Plant Font Biome


Go to the "Open" control on the menu bar, and select "Photo Gallery".
Product Rectangle Font World Terrestrial plant


Step 3 - When your image opens in Photo Gallery, click on the "Edit, organize, or share" on the menu bar.
Property Photograph Product Plant Tree


The next view will show you all of the photos in the folder where your series was saved, and you can select the ones that you want to include in the Panorama.

Step 4 - As you pause your mouse cursor over each photo, you will see a checkbox appear next to the top left corner of the photo. Click the checkbox to select the photo, and repeat this for each of the photos in the series. It doesn't matter what order you select them in, the software seems to sort them out correctly.
Rectangle Font Line Screenshot Technology


Step 5 - Once you have selected all of the photos in the series (I'm only using 2 in this example), click on "Create" on the menu bar, then click on "Panorama" and you will see a progress bar as the Panorama is created.
Product Rectangle Organism Font Slope


Step 6 - If the software has problems matching your photos you will see a message appear, but you should normally get a "Save" screen where you can name the Panorama, and also decide which folder you want to save it in (the default folder will be the same one that the original photos are in).
Product Font Screenshot Software Technology


Step 7a - You will now see the Panorama, but there will usually be black sections around the border as shown below. To eliminate these, Click on the "Crop" button, and you will see a superimposed grid (shown below). Use the "handles" at the corners of the grid to drag it to cover as much of the Panorama as possible, while leaving out the black areas as shown in the second photo below. Once you are satisfied with the area covered by the grid, click the "Crop" button once more, and you will see the cropped photo.
Photograph Light Product Car Plant


Plant Car Vehicle Window Sky


Step 7b - If you are happy with the resulting photo, click on the "Close file" button to save your Panorama, and return to the Photo Gallery.
Car Plant Vehicle Tire Wheel


The next posting will cover how to make further adjustments to your Panorama, such as brightness or contrast, straightening, and resizing.

Hope this is of interest.
Best regards.
Thanks Lew. I'll have to take a look at that one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Adjusting Your Photos.

I mentioned in the first part of this Blog that I would be adding some information on Adjusting Your Photos, so here it is. This section starts with "Step 8" as a continuation to the first section, but these instructions can be used independently from the Panorama function in the event that you have any photos that would benefit from adjustments such as exposure, contrast, highlights, dark areas, etc. Once again, I will mention that the required software is already installed on your PC if you have Windows NT, 7, or 8. If you need to find where it is, go back to the first steps of the first part of this series.

Please remember that the Panorama creation process also works well with a vertical series of photos, for those Corner Cabinets, sculptures, etc.

Now for Part 2 . . .

Step 8 - Earlier, I mentioned adjusting the exposure once the photos were combined. To do this, click on the "Fine Tune" button, and you will see a set of controls appear on the right side as shown below. The main one to use first is the "Adjust exposure", and this will permit individual adjustment of brightness, contrast, shadows, and highlights.

Automotive parking light Land vehicle Car Vehicle Plant


Once again, I will say don't worry about doing anything wrong. If you look at the top right corner of the window, you will find a button marked "Revert to original". So, if you end up with an image that you are not happy with, click on this button, and you'll be back to Step 8. Remember that your originals have remained untouched, so you also have the option to go right back to Step 1 and have fun doing this all over again.

Now try the "Contrast" and "Brightness" controls first, then touch up any really dark or light areas by using the "Shadows" and "Highlights" controls to bring them more into balance.
I usually work back and forth between all 4 controls until I'm satisfied.

Product Automotive tire Tire Automotive lighting Font


There is also an "Auto adjust" button on the menu bar that you can try. This will also apply changes such as "straighten". You can use this "Auto adjust" to obtain a starting point, then you can use the manual adjustments just mentioned to do any further changes.
Plant Photograph Car Nature Vehicle


Step 9 - Once you are satisfied with your adjustments, click on the "Close file" button at the top right. This will save the Panorama with the name you previously selected, into the folder that you chose, and you will be returned to that folder.

Rectangle Font Slope Parallel Circle


Step 10 - Double click on the new Panorama photo to admire your results in the Windows Photo Viewer.

Plant Sky Vehicle Car Automotive lighting


NOTES:-
• When I try to create my Panorama from the selected photos, I sometimes get an error if I have selected more than 4 or 5 photos. Usually, I can get around this by selecting the first 3 photos, making a Panorama as described, then I make a second Panorama using the rest of the photos, and finally I make a third (final) Panorama by using the 2 Panoramas that I have just created.
• If you want to make any further adjustments to your new Panorama, you can use the "Open" control on the menu bar just as you did in Step 2, then go through whatever additional adjustments you need.
• You can also use the "Edit" process to adjust any single photo that you have (exposure, rotate, straighten, effects, etc.).
• If you want to play with the various features of this process, simply make a copy of the photo that you want to work with, and play with the copy rather than your original.
• Since I enjoy carving walking staffs and canes, some of the items that I photograph really need this feature in order to show a reasonable level of detail on a long item. This permits me to take a series of detailed photos along the length of a staff, then produce a Panorama photo of the entire piece. With this type of photo, I find it best to move along the staff as I take the overlapping photos. If I stand in one spot, and "pan" along (rather than moving along), the final Panorama ends up having distortion due to the angled shots. A final cropping of the Panorama eliminates unwanted background and also helps to reduce the file size if I am posting or E-mailing the photo.

Have fun with your photos.
 

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Adjusting Your Photos.

I mentioned in the first part of this Blog that I would be adding some information on Adjusting Your Photos, so here it is. This section starts with "Step 8" as a continuation to the first section, but these instructions can be used independently from the Panorama function in the event that you have any photos that would benefit from adjustments such as exposure, contrast, highlights, dark areas, etc. Once again, I will mention that the required software is already installed on your PC if you have Windows NT, 7, or 8. If you need to find where it is, go back to the first steps of the first part of this series.

Please remember that the Panorama creation process also works well with a vertical series of photos, for those Corner Cabinets, sculptures, etc.

Now for Part 2 . . .

Step 8 - Earlier, I mentioned adjusting the exposure once the photos were combined. To do this, click on the "Fine Tune" button, and you will see a set of controls appear on the right side as shown below. The main one to use first is the "Adjust exposure", and this will permit individual adjustment of brightness, contrast, shadows, and highlights.

Automotive parking light Land vehicle Car Vehicle Plant


Once again, I will say don't worry about doing anything wrong. If you look at the top right corner of the window, you will find a button marked "Revert to original". So, if you end up with an image that you are not happy with, click on this button, and you'll be back to Step 8. Remember that your originals have remained untouched, so you also have the option to go right back to Step 1 and have fun doing this all over again.

Now try the "Contrast" and "Brightness" controls first, then touch up any really dark or light areas by using the "Shadows" and "Highlights" controls to bring them more into balance.
I usually work back and forth between all 4 controls until I'm satisfied.

Product Automotive tire Tire Automotive lighting Font


There is also an "Auto adjust" button on the menu bar that you can try. This will also apply changes such as "straighten". You can use this "Auto adjust" to obtain a starting point, then you can use the manual adjustments just mentioned to do any further changes.
Plant Photograph Car Nature Vehicle


Step 9 - Once you are satisfied with your adjustments, click on the "Close file" button at the top right. This will save the Panorama with the name you previously selected, into the folder that you chose, and you will be returned to that folder.

Rectangle Font Slope Parallel Circle


Step 10 - Double click on the new Panorama photo to admire your results in the Windows Photo Viewer.

Plant Sky Vehicle Car Automotive lighting


NOTES:-
• When I try to create my Panorama from the selected photos, I sometimes get an error if I have selected more than 4 or 5 photos. Usually, I can get around this by selecting the first 3 photos, making a Panorama as described, then I make a second Panorama using the rest of the photos, and finally I make a third (final) Panorama by using the 2 Panoramas that I have just created.
• If you want to make any further adjustments to your new Panorama, you can use the "Open" control on the menu bar just as you did in Step 2, then go through whatever additional adjustments you need.
• You can also use the "Edit" process to adjust any single photo that you have (exposure, rotate, straighten, effects, etc.).
• If you want to play with the various features of this process, simply make a copy of the photo that you want to work with, and play with the copy rather than your original.
• Since I enjoy carving walking staffs and canes, some of the items that I photograph really need this feature in order to show a reasonable level of detail on a long item. This permits me to take a series of detailed photos along the length of a staff, then produce a Panorama photo of the entire piece. With this type of photo, I find it best to move along the staff as I take the overlapping photos. If I stand in one spot, and "pan" along (rather than moving along), the final Panorama ends up having distortion due to the angled shots. A final cropping of the Panorama eliminates unwanted background and also helps to reduce the file size if I am posting or E-mailing the photo.

Have fun with your photos.
Thanks, John!

The tip about moving instead of panning is really helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Adjusting Your Photos.

I mentioned in the first part of this Blog that I would be adding some information on Adjusting Your Photos, so here it is. This section starts with "Step 8" as a continuation to the first section, but these instructions can be used independently from the Panorama function in the event that you have any photos that would benefit from adjustments such as exposure, contrast, highlights, dark areas, etc. Once again, I will mention that the required software is already installed on your PC if you have Windows NT, 7, or 8. If you need to find where it is, go back to the first steps of the first part of this series.

Please remember that the Panorama creation process also works well with a vertical series of photos, for those Corner Cabinets, sculptures, etc.

Now for Part 2 . . .

Step 8 - Earlier, I mentioned adjusting the exposure once the photos were combined. To do this, click on the "Fine Tune" button, and you will see a set of controls appear on the right side as shown below. The main one to use first is the "Adjust exposure", and this will permit individual adjustment of brightness, contrast, shadows, and highlights.

Automotive parking light Land vehicle Car Vehicle Plant


Once again, I will say don't worry about doing anything wrong. If you look at the top right corner of the window, you will find a button marked "Revert to original". So, if you end up with an image that you are not happy with, click on this button, and you'll be back to Step 8. Remember that your originals have remained untouched, so you also have the option to go right back to Step 1 and have fun doing this all over again.

Now try the "Contrast" and "Brightness" controls first, then touch up any really dark or light areas by using the "Shadows" and "Highlights" controls to bring them more into balance.
I usually work back and forth between all 4 controls until I'm satisfied.

Product Automotive tire Tire Automotive lighting Font


There is also an "Auto adjust" button on the menu bar that you can try. This will also apply changes such as "straighten". You can use this "Auto adjust" to obtain a starting point, then you can use the manual adjustments just mentioned to do any further changes.
Plant Photograph Car Nature Vehicle


Step 9 - Once you are satisfied with your adjustments, click on the "Close file" button at the top right. This will save the Panorama with the name you previously selected, into the folder that you chose, and you will be returned to that folder.

Rectangle Font Slope Parallel Circle


Step 10 - Double click on the new Panorama photo to admire your results in the Windows Photo Viewer.

Plant Sky Vehicle Car Automotive lighting


NOTES:-
• When I try to create my Panorama from the selected photos, I sometimes get an error if I have selected more than 4 or 5 photos. Usually, I can get around this by selecting the first 3 photos, making a Panorama as described, then I make a second Panorama using the rest of the photos, and finally I make a third (final) Panorama by using the 2 Panoramas that I have just created.
• If you want to make any further adjustments to your new Panorama, you can use the "Open" control on the menu bar just as you did in Step 2, then go through whatever additional adjustments you need.
• You can also use the "Edit" process to adjust any single photo that you have (exposure, rotate, straighten, effects, etc.).
• If you want to play with the various features of this process, simply make a copy of the photo that you want to work with, and play with the copy rather than your original.
• Since I enjoy carving walking staffs and canes, some of the items that I photograph really need this feature in order to show a reasonable level of detail on a long item. This permits me to take a series of detailed photos along the length of a staff, then produce a Panorama photo of the entire piece. With this type of photo, I find it best to move along the staff as I take the overlapping photos. If I stand in one spot, and "pan" along (rather than moving along), the final Panorama ends up having distortion due to the angled shots. A final cropping of the Panorama eliminates unwanted background and also helps to reduce the file size if I am posting or E-mailing the photo.

Have fun with your photos.
Lew - Glad you like it. Might come in handy if you make any 2 person rolling pins? Do they exist? ;)
Have a great day.
 

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Adjusting Your Photos.

I mentioned in the first part of this Blog that I would be adding some information on Adjusting Your Photos, so here it is. This section starts with "Step 8" as a continuation to the first section, but these instructions can be used independently from the Panorama function in the event that you have any photos that would benefit from adjustments such as exposure, contrast, highlights, dark areas, etc. Once again, I will mention that the required software is already installed on your PC if you have Windows NT, 7, or 8. If you need to find where it is, go back to the first steps of the first part of this series.

Please remember that the Panorama creation process also works well with a vertical series of photos, for those Corner Cabinets, sculptures, etc.

Now for Part 2 . . .

Step 8 - Earlier, I mentioned adjusting the exposure once the photos were combined. To do this, click on the "Fine Tune" button, and you will see a set of controls appear on the right side as shown below. The main one to use first is the "Adjust exposure", and this will permit individual adjustment of brightness, contrast, shadows, and highlights.

Automotive parking light Land vehicle Car Vehicle Plant


Once again, I will say don't worry about doing anything wrong. If you look at the top right corner of the window, you will find a button marked "Revert to original". So, if you end up with an image that you are not happy with, click on this button, and you'll be back to Step 8. Remember that your originals have remained untouched, so you also have the option to go right back to Step 1 and have fun doing this all over again.

Now try the "Contrast" and "Brightness" controls first, then touch up any really dark or light areas by using the "Shadows" and "Highlights" controls to bring them more into balance.
I usually work back and forth between all 4 controls until I'm satisfied.

Product Automotive tire Tire Automotive lighting Font


There is also an "Auto adjust" button on the menu bar that you can try. This will also apply changes such as "straighten". You can use this "Auto adjust" to obtain a starting point, then you can use the manual adjustments just mentioned to do any further changes.
Plant Photograph Car Nature Vehicle


Step 9 - Once you are satisfied with your adjustments, click on the "Close file" button at the top right. This will save the Panorama with the name you previously selected, into the folder that you chose, and you will be returned to that folder.

Rectangle Font Slope Parallel Circle


Step 10 - Double click on the new Panorama photo to admire your results in the Windows Photo Viewer.

Plant Sky Vehicle Car Automotive lighting


NOTES:-
• When I try to create my Panorama from the selected photos, I sometimes get an error if I have selected more than 4 or 5 photos. Usually, I can get around this by selecting the first 3 photos, making a Panorama as described, then I make a second Panorama using the rest of the photos, and finally I make a third (final) Panorama by using the 2 Panoramas that I have just created.
• If you want to make any further adjustments to your new Panorama, you can use the "Open" control on the menu bar just as you did in Step 2, then go through whatever additional adjustments you need.
• You can also use the "Edit" process to adjust any single photo that you have (exposure, rotate, straighten, effects, etc.).
• If you want to play with the various features of this process, simply make a copy of the photo that you want to work with, and play with the copy rather than your original.
• Since I enjoy carving walking staffs and canes, some of the items that I photograph really need this feature in order to show a reasonable level of detail on a long item. This permits me to take a series of detailed photos along the length of a staff, then produce a Panorama photo of the entire piece. With this type of photo, I find it best to move along the staff as I take the overlapping photos. If I stand in one spot, and "pan" along (rather than moving along), the final Panorama ends up having distortion due to the angled shots. A final cropping of the Panorama eliminates unwanted background and also helps to reduce the file size if I am posting or E-mailing the photo.

Have fun with your photos.
Thanks John. I found your panorama tricks very useful. I will surely be trying them out soon.
 

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Adjusting Your Photos.

I mentioned in the first part of this Blog that I would be adding some information on Adjusting Your Photos, so here it is. This section starts with "Step 8" as a continuation to the first section, but these instructions can be used independently from the Panorama function in the event that you have any photos that would benefit from adjustments such as exposure, contrast, highlights, dark areas, etc. Once again, I will mention that the required software is already installed on your PC if you have Windows NT, 7, or 8. If you need to find where it is, go back to the first steps of the first part of this series.

Please remember that the Panorama creation process also works well with a vertical series of photos, for those Corner Cabinets, sculptures, etc.

Now for Part 2 . . .

Step 8 - Earlier, I mentioned adjusting the exposure once the photos were combined. To do this, click on the "Fine Tune" button, and you will see a set of controls appear on the right side as shown below. The main one to use first is the "Adjust exposure", and this will permit individual adjustment of brightness, contrast, shadows, and highlights.

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Once again, I will say don't worry about doing anything wrong. If you look at the top right corner of the window, you will find a button marked "Revert to original". So, if you end up with an image that you are not happy with, click on this button, and you'll be back to Step 8. Remember that your originals have remained untouched, so you also have the option to go right back to Step 1 and have fun doing this all over again.

Now try the "Contrast" and "Brightness" controls first, then touch up any really dark or light areas by using the "Shadows" and "Highlights" controls to bring them more into balance.
I usually work back and forth between all 4 controls until I'm satisfied.

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There is also an "Auto adjust" button on the menu bar that you can try. This will also apply changes such as "straighten". You can use this "Auto adjust" to obtain a starting point, then you can use the manual adjustments just mentioned to do any further changes.
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Step 9 - Once you are satisfied with your adjustments, click on the "Close file" button at the top right. This will save the Panorama with the name you previously selected, into the folder that you chose, and you will be returned to that folder.

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Step 10 - Double click on the new Panorama photo to admire your results in the Windows Photo Viewer.

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NOTES:-
• When I try to create my Panorama from the selected photos, I sometimes get an error if I have selected more than 4 or 5 photos. Usually, I can get around this by selecting the first 3 photos, making a Panorama as described, then I make a second Panorama using the rest of the photos, and finally I make a third (final) Panorama by using the 2 Panoramas that I have just created.
• If you want to make any further adjustments to your new Panorama, you can use the "Open" control on the menu bar just as you did in Step 2, then go through whatever additional adjustments you need.
• You can also use the "Edit" process to adjust any single photo that you have (exposure, rotate, straighten, effects, etc.).
• If you want to play with the various features of this process, simply make a copy of the photo that you want to work with, and play with the copy rather than your original.
• Since I enjoy carving walking staffs and canes, some of the items that I photograph really need this feature in order to show a reasonable level of detail on a long item. This permits me to take a series of detailed photos along the length of a staff, then produce a Panorama photo of the entire piece. With this type of photo, I find it best to move along the staff as I take the overlapping photos. If I stand in one spot, and "pan" along (rather than moving along), the final Panorama ends up having distortion due to the angled shots. A final cropping of the Panorama eliminates unwanted background and also helps to reduce the file size if I am posting or E-mailing the photo.

Have fun with your photos.
Nice tips John
 

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