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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1st steps

Its time once again to do a big time tune up on the old Rockwell Model 10.

Due to the number of threads on tuning up old saws that I've seen, plus the number of people who think its impossible to keep a contractor saw in alignment I figured I would share my method, which is built up of a couple of different articles and discussions I've read/had over the years.

Unfortunately this first chuck I've already done and didn't think to take pictures, but it is fairly easy.

Clean off a workstation on a bench or countertop. I have a couple granite surface plates 12×18 and 1 will come in handy for this. If you don't have one, a good flat workbench or countertop should suffice.

The 1st steps are to take the "guts" out. Arbor, tie rods, the whole assembly.

Step 1. Remove the blade and splitter.

Step 2. Remove the height adjustment Hand wheel. Just take the locking portion off and pull straight out. I like to have the arbor at 1/2 height to keep it out of the way. At this time make sure the bevel adjustment wheel isn't locked down.

Step 3. Take off the belt and motor bracket. 2 set screws hold the motor mount to the tie rods.

Step 4. Remove the rear trunion. Hold onto the mating part while you do this and remove the 2 bolts that hold the rear trunion in place. A little wiggling should get it off the male mating part. Put the bolts and trunion on the table top.

Step 5. Reach around the side to the bevel adjustment wheel and turn it towards 45 degrees to get the worm disengaged from the guts.

Step 6. Pull Straight back and move the guts to your work station.

Step 7. Remove the bolts from the front trunion. The way that the bevel adjustment hooks upto this trunion makes it not worth the effort to remove it fully, however you want to be able to clean the entire thing with a nylon or old tooth brush.

At this time if you have not done so already, goto the hardware store and buy replacement bolts for the trunions. 4 grade 5 or grade 8 bolts and 4 lock washers. The old ones are now junk. The lock washers are the Number 1 reason that my saw holds its alignment.

More to come, hopefully this time with pictures. I have the guts on the bench now.
 

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1st steps

Its time once again to do a big time tune up on the old Rockwell Model 10.

Due to the number of threads on tuning up old saws that I've seen, plus the number of people who think its impossible to keep a contractor saw in alignment I figured I would share my method, which is built up of a couple of different articles and discussions I've read/had over the years.

Unfortunately this first chuck I've already done and didn't think to take pictures, but it is fairly easy.

Clean off a workstation on a bench or countertop. I have a couple granite surface plates 12×18 and 1 will come in handy for this. If you don't have one, a good flat workbench or countertop should suffice.

The 1st steps are to take the "guts" out. Arbor, tie rods, the whole assembly.

Step 1. Remove the blade and splitter.

Step 2. Remove the height adjustment Hand wheel. Just take the locking portion off and pull straight out. I like to have the arbor at 1/2 height to keep it out of the way. At this time make sure the bevel adjustment wheel isn't locked down.

Step 3. Take off the belt and motor bracket. 2 set screws hold the motor mount to the tie rods.

Step 4. Remove the rear trunion. Hold onto the mating part while you do this and remove the 2 bolts that hold the rear trunion in place. A little wiggling should get it off the male mating part. Put the bolts and trunion on the table top.

Step 5. Reach around the side to the bevel adjustment wheel and turn it towards 45 degrees to get the worm disengaged from the guts.

Step 6. Pull Straight back and move the guts to your work station.

Step 7. Remove the bolts from the front trunion. The way that the bevel adjustment hooks upto this trunion makes it not worth the effort to remove it fully, however you want to be able to clean the entire thing with a nylon or old tooth brush.

At this time if you have not done so already, goto the hardware store and buy replacement bolts for the trunions. 4 grade 5 or grade 8 bolts and 4 lock washers. The old ones are now junk. The lock washers are the Number 1 reason that my saw holds its alignment.

More to come, hopefully this time with pictures. I have the guts on the bench now.
I have a Rockwell model 10 that needs a proper tune up. I look forward to following your blog. Thanks for sharing!
 

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1st steps

Its time once again to do a big time tune up on the old Rockwell Model 10.

Due to the number of threads on tuning up old saws that I've seen, plus the number of people who think its impossible to keep a contractor saw in alignment I figured I would share my method, which is built up of a couple of different articles and discussions I've read/had over the years.

Unfortunately this first chuck I've already done and didn't think to take pictures, but it is fairly easy.

Clean off a workstation on a bench or countertop. I have a couple granite surface plates 12×18 and 1 will come in handy for this. If you don't have one, a good flat workbench or countertop should suffice.

The 1st steps are to take the "guts" out. Arbor, tie rods, the whole assembly.

Step 1. Remove the blade and splitter.

Step 2. Remove the height adjustment Hand wheel. Just take the locking portion off and pull straight out. I like to have the arbor at 1/2 height to keep it out of the way. At this time make sure the bevel adjustment wheel isn't locked down.

Step 3. Take off the belt and motor bracket. 2 set screws hold the motor mount to the tie rods.

Step 4. Remove the rear trunion. Hold onto the mating part while you do this and remove the 2 bolts that hold the rear trunion in place. A little wiggling should get it off the male mating part. Put the bolts and trunion on the table top.

Step 5. Reach around the side to the bevel adjustment wheel and turn it towards 45 degrees to get the worm disengaged from the guts.

Step 6. Pull Straight back and move the guts to your work station.

Step 7. Remove the bolts from the front trunion. The way that the bevel adjustment hooks upto this trunion makes it not worth the effort to remove it fully, however you want to be able to clean the entire thing with a nylon or old tooth brush.

At this time if you have not done so already, goto the hardware store and buy replacement bolts for the trunions. 4 grade 5 or grade 8 bolts and 4 lock washers. The old ones are now junk. The lock washers are the Number 1 reason that my saw holds its alignment.

More to come, hopefully this time with pictures. I have the guts on the bench now.
thanks for the info
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Cleanup and finishing

With the guts removed and on the flat surface



You can detect of the 2 bars are out of alignment by attempting to rock them. This is similar to the Delta method but we rock the bars not a flat piece of wood on the bars.

If they are out of alignment clamp down the bars and loosen the 2 nuts on the rear side.



Once the 2 nuts are loosened, make sure no sawdust is jammed behind them, loosen both clamps then reclamp and double check that the arbor is 90 degrees to the flat surface with a small engineers square.

Once everything is lined up, tighten the heck out of both nuts.

Go back the the saw and clean the front trunnion. Both the U shaped area and the worm gear and the guide surfaces next to the worm gear are the main areas of concern. Get them good and clean and spray them down with a dry lube.

Install your good graded bolts with lock washers.



You'll notice that the grade 8 1 inch are a tad larger than the originals. This should not be a problem with the lock washer added to the mix. Install new cut washers these are thicker than regular washers and shouldn't distort (trunnion, cut washer, lockwasher, bolt head)

Loosely install the 2 bolts on the front trunnion. Then reinstall the guts, this takes a little jimmying and watch out for the degree pointer getting jammed up.

Once you have the guts installed in the front trunnion use a clamp to hold it in place, then install the rear trunion and clamp that in place as well.



By keeping everything clamped we can tighten down the bolts to the alignment phase and ensure that we are keeping everything in position, nothing should move after we tighten down the bolts.

Reinstall the motor at this point, alignment without the motor and belt installed is worthless.

Align by whatever your usual means is. I don't own PALS, or a 100 dollar aligning kit. I simply have a 15 dollar dial indicator shoved into a piece of wood. I get it to about .002ish and that's good enough.

Be careful when you tighten the trunnions down, the alignment can shift based on the force applied to the bolt head, I mix pulling the wrench with pushing the wrench to minimize the disturbance from this action.

Tighten the heck out of these bolts, my saw will move long before I get to the strip out the cast iron area of torque. While I want to caution you to not strip out the bolt holes, this is the area most people skimp on and is the cause of most alignment difficulties after bevel cuts.

Here is a 45 degree test cut I did after doing this procedure. I only had 1 side jointed so it's not sitting very well on the table top.



Re check your alignment after setting to 45 degrees. If it moved you didn't tighten it down enough. I cannot find a torque value recommend by anyone on tightening them. I would love a real number to give someone without ruining my saw to see what the max value is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Cleanup and finishing

With the guts removed and on the flat surface



You can detect of the 2 bars are out of alignment by attempting to rock them. This is similar to the Delta method but we rock the bars not a flat piece of wood on the bars.

If they are out of alignment clamp down the bars and loosen the 2 nuts on the rear side.



Once the 2 nuts are loosened, make sure no sawdust is jammed behind them, loosen both clamps then reclamp and double check that the arbor is 90 degrees to the flat surface with a small engineers square.

Once everything is lined up, tighten the heck out of both nuts.

Go back the the saw and clean the front trunnion. Both the U shaped area and the worm gear and the guide surfaces next to the worm gear are the main areas of concern. Get them good and clean and spray them down with a dry lube.

Install your good graded bolts with lock washers.



You'll notice that the grade 8 1 inch are a tad larger than the originals. This should not be a problem with the lock washer added to the mix. Install new cut washers these are thicker than regular washers and shouldn't distort (trunnion, cut washer, lockwasher, bolt head)

Loosely install the 2 bolts on the front trunnion. Then reinstall the guts, this takes a little jimmying and watch out for the degree pointer getting jammed up.

Once you have the guts installed in the front trunnion use a clamp to hold it in place, then install the rear trunion and clamp that in place as well.



By keeping everything clamped we can tighten down the bolts to the alignment phase and ensure that we are keeping everything in position, nothing should move after we tighten down the bolts.

Reinstall the motor at this point, alignment without the motor and belt installed is worthless.

Align by whatever your usual means is. I don't own PALS, or a 100 dollar aligning kit. I simply have a 15 dollar dial indicator shoved into a piece of wood. I get it to about .002ish and that's good enough.

Be careful when you tighten the trunnions down, the alignment can shift based on the force applied to the bolt head, I mix pulling the wrench with pushing the wrench to minimize the disturbance from this action.

Tighten the heck out of these bolts, my saw will move long before I get to the strip out the cast iron area of torque. While I want to caution you to not strip out the bolt holes, this is the area most people skimp on and is the cause of most alignment difficulties after bevel cuts.

Here is a 45 degree test cut I did after doing this procedure. I only had 1 side jointed so it's not sitting very well on the table top.



Re check your alignment after setting to 45 degrees. If it moved you didn't tighten it down enough. I cannot find a torque value recommend by anyone on tightening them. I would love a real number to give someone without ruining my saw to see what the max value is.
I want to add that I have a Delta T2 fence and with the large motor mount that I have on my saw I had to grind a little divot on the rear rail to keep the mount from hitting the rail just a hair before I got to 45 degrees.
 

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Cleanup and finishing

With the guts removed and on the flat surface



You can detect of the 2 bars are out of alignment by attempting to rock them. This is similar to the Delta method but we rock the bars not a flat piece of wood on the bars.

If they are out of alignment clamp down the bars and loosen the 2 nuts on the rear side.



Once the 2 nuts are loosened, make sure no sawdust is jammed behind them, loosen both clamps then reclamp and double check that the arbor is 90 degrees to the flat surface with a small engineers square.

Once everything is lined up, tighten the heck out of both nuts.

Go back the the saw and clean the front trunnion. Both the U shaped area and the worm gear and the guide surfaces next to the worm gear are the main areas of concern. Get them good and clean and spray them down with a dry lube.

Install your good graded bolts with lock washers.



You'll notice that the grade 8 1 inch are a tad larger than the originals. This should not be a problem with the lock washer added to the mix. Install new cut washers these are thicker than regular washers and shouldn't distort (trunnion, cut washer, lockwasher, bolt head)

Loosely install the 2 bolts on the front trunnion. Then reinstall the guts, this takes a little jimmying and watch out for the degree pointer getting jammed up.

Once you have the guts installed in the front trunnion use a clamp to hold it in place, then install the rear trunion and clamp that in place as well.



By keeping everything clamped we can tighten down the bolts to the alignment phase and ensure that we are keeping everything in position, nothing should move after we tighten down the bolts.

Reinstall the motor at this point, alignment without the motor and belt installed is worthless.

Align by whatever your usual means is. I don't own PALS, or a 100 dollar aligning kit. I simply have a 15 dollar dial indicator shoved into a piece of wood. I get it to about .002ish and that's good enough.

Be careful when you tighten the trunnions down, the alignment can shift based on the force applied to the bolt head, I mix pulling the wrench with pushing the wrench to minimize the disturbance from this action.

Tighten the heck out of these bolts, my saw will move long before I get to the strip out the cast iron area of torque. While I want to caution you to not strip out the bolt holes, this is the area most people skimp on and is the cause of most alignment difficulties after bevel cuts.

Here is a 45 degree test cut I did after doing this procedure. I only had 1 side jointed so it's not sitting very well on the table top.



Re check your alignment after setting to 45 degrees. If it moved you didn't tighten it down enough. I cannot find a torque value recommend by anyone on tightening them. I would love a real number to give someone without ruining my saw to see what the max value is.
Thanks for the info. It reminds me that I need to get that done once I have finished my bench.
 

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Cleanup and finishing

With the guts removed and on the flat surface



You can detect of the 2 bars are out of alignment by attempting to rock them. This is similar to the Delta method but we rock the bars not a flat piece of wood on the bars.

If they are out of alignment clamp down the bars and loosen the 2 nuts on the rear side.



Once the 2 nuts are loosened, make sure no sawdust is jammed behind them, loosen both clamps then reclamp and double check that the arbor is 90 degrees to the flat surface with a small engineers square.

Once everything is lined up, tighten the heck out of both nuts.

Go back the the saw and clean the front trunnion. Both the U shaped area and the worm gear and the guide surfaces next to the worm gear are the main areas of concern. Get them good and clean and spray them down with a dry lube.

Install your good graded bolts with lock washers.



You'll notice that the grade 8 1 inch are a tad larger than the originals. This should not be a problem with the lock washer added to the mix. Install new cut washers these are thicker than regular washers and shouldn't distort (trunnion, cut washer, lockwasher, bolt head)

Loosely install the 2 bolts on the front trunnion. Then reinstall the guts, this takes a little jimmying and watch out for the degree pointer getting jammed up.

Once you have the guts installed in the front trunnion use a clamp to hold it in place, then install the rear trunion and clamp that in place as well.



By keeping everything clamped we can tighten down the bolts to the alignment phase and ensure that we are keeping everything in position, nothing should move after we tighten down the bolts.

Reinstall the motor at this point, alignment without the motor and belt installed is worthless.

Align by whatever your usual means is. I don't own PALS, or a 100 dollar aligning kit. I simply have a 15 dollar dial indicator shoved into a piece of wood. I get it to about .002ish and that's good enough.

Be careful when you tighten the trunnions down, the alignment can shift based on the force applied to the bolt head, I mix pulling the wrench with pushing the wrench to minimize the disturbance from this action.

Tighten the heck out of these bolts, my saw will move long before I get to the strip out the cast iron area of torque. While I want to caution you to not strip out the bolt holes, this is the area most people skimp on and is the cause of most alignment difficulties after bevel cuts.

Here is a 45 degree test cut I did after doing this procedure. I only had 1 side jointed so it's not sitting very well on the table top.



Re check your alignment after setting to 45 degrees. If it moved you didn't tighten it down enough. I cannot find a torque value recommend by anyone on tightening them. I would love a real number to give someone without ruining my saw to see what the max value is.
Marc, thats pretty cool, I've never had to take one of my Delta Contractor's saws apart, but you give me some confidence if I should ever have to, and I'll know who to ask if I have a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Cleanup and finishing

With the guts removed and on the flat surface



You can detect of the 2 bars are out of alignment by attempting to rock them. This is similar to the Delta method but we rock the bars not a flat piece of wood on the bars.

If they are out of alignment clamp down the bars and loosen the 2 nuts on the rear side.



Once the 2 nuts are loosened, make sure no sawdust is jammed behind them, loosen both clamps then reclamp and double check that the arbor is 90 degrees to the flat surface with a small engineers square.

Once everything is lined up, tighten the heck out of both nuts.

Go back the the saw and clean the front trunnion. Both the U shaped area and the worm gear and the guide surfaces next to the worm gear are the main areas of concern. Get them good and clean and spray them down with a dry lube.

Install your good graded bolts with lock washers.



You'll notice that the grade 8 1 inch are a tad larger than the originals. This should not be a problem with the lock washer added to the mix. Install new cut washers these are thicker than regular washers and shouldn't distort (trunnion, cut washer, lockwasher, bolt head)

Loosely install the 2 bolts on the front trunnion. Then reinstall the guts, this takes a little jimmying and watch out for the degree pointer getting jammed up.

Once you have the guts installed in the front trunnion use a clamp to hold it in place, then install the rear trunion and clamp that in place as well.



By keeping everything clamped we can tighten down the bolts to the alignment phase and ensure that we are keeping everything in position, nothing should move after we tighten down the bolts.

Reinstall the motor at this point, alignment without the motor and belt installed is worthless.

Align by whatever your usual means is. I don't own PALS, or a 100 dollar aligning kit. I simply have a 15 dollar dial indicator shoved into a piece of wood. I get it to about .002ish and that's good enough.

Be careful when you tighten the trunnions down, the alignment can shift based on the force applied to the bolt head, I mix pulling the wrench with pushing the wrench to minimize the disturbance from this action.

Tighten the heck out of these bolts, my saw will move long before I get to the strip out the cast iron area of torque. While I want to caution you to not strip out the bolt holes, this is the area most people skimp on and is the cause of most alignment difficulties after bevel cuts.

Here is a 45 degree test cut I did after doing this procedure. I only had 1 side jointed so it's not sitting very well on the table top.



Re check your alignment after setting to 45 degrees. If it moved you didn't tighten it down enough. I cannot find a torque value recommend by anyone on tightening them. I would love a real number to give someone without ruining my saw to see what the max value is.
Thanks,

I don't have a machine I HAVEN'T taken apart. I was that kid that broke his toys to see how they worked and they never worked right again. Thankfully I got past the "never worked right again" part.
 

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957 Posts
Cleanup and finishing

With the guts removed and on the flat surface



You can detect of the 2 bars are out of alignment by attempting to rock them. This is similar to the Delta method but we rock the bars not a flat piece of wood on the bars.

If they are out of alignment clamp down the bars and loosen the 2 nuts on the rear side.



Once the 2 nuts are loosened, make sure no sawdust is jammed behind them, loosen both clamps then reclamp and double check that the arbor is 90 degrees to the flat surface with a small engineers square.

Once everything is lined up, tighten the heck out of both nuts.

Go back the the saw and clean the front trunnion. Both the U shaped area and the worm gear and the guide surfaces next to the worm gear are the main areas of concern. Get them good and clean and spray them down with a dry lube.

Install your good graded bolts with lock washers.



You'll notice that the grade 8 1 inch are a tad larger than the originals. This should not be a problem with the lock washer added to the mix. Install new cut washers these are thicker than regular washers and shouldn't distort (trunnion, cut washer, lockwasher, bolt head)

Loosely install the 2 bolts on the front trunnion. Then reinstall the guts, this takes a little jimmying and watch out for the degree pointer getting jammed up.

Once you have the guts installed in the front trunnion use a clamp to hold it in place, then install the rear trunion and clamp that in place as well.



By keeping everything clamped we can tighten down the bolts to the alignment phase and ensure that we are keeping everything in position, nothing should move after we tighten down the bolts.

Reinstall the motor at this point, alignment without the motor and belt installed is worthless.

Align by whatever your usual means is. I don't own PALS, or a 100 dollar aligning kit. I simply have a 15 dollar dial indicator shoved into a piece of wood. I get it to about .002ish and that's good enough.

Be careful when you tighten the trunnions down, the alignment can shift based on the force applied to the bolt head, I mix pulling the wrench with pushing the wrench to minimize the disturbance from this action.

Tighten the heck out of these bolts, my saw will move long before I get to the strip out the cast iron area of torque. While I want to caution you to not strip out the bolt holes, this is the area most people skimp on and is the cause of most alignment difficulties after bevel cuts.

Here is a 45 degree test cut I did after doing this procedure. I only had 1 side jointed so it's not sitting very well on the table top.



Re check your alignment after setting to 45 degrees. If it moved you didn't tighten it down enough. I cannot find a torque value recommend by anyone on tightening them. I would love a real number to give someone without ruining my saw to see what the max value is.
Marc, I forgot to mention that I couldn't help to notice all the sawdust inside your saw. Have you seen my solution for that ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Cleanup and finishing

With the guts removed and on the flat surface



You can detect of the 2 bars are out of alignment by attempting to rock them. This is similar to the Delta method but we rock the bars not a flat piece of wood on the bars.

If they are out of alignment clamp down the bars and loosen the 2 nuts on the rear side.



Once the 2 nuts are loosened, make sure no sawdust is jammed behind them, loosen both clamps then reclamp and double check that the arbor is 90 degrees to the flat surface with a small engineers square.

Once everything is lined up, tighten the heck out of both nuts.

Go back the the saw and clean the front trunnion. Both the U shaped area and the worm gear and the guide surfaces next to the worm gear are the main areas of concern. Get them good and clean and spray them down with a dry lube.

Install your good graded bolts with lock washers.



You'll notice that the grade 8 1 inch are a tad larger than the originals. This should not be a problem with the lock washer added to the mix. Install new cut washers these are thicker than regular washers and shouldn't distort (trunnion, cut washer, lockwasher, bolt head)

Loosely install the 2 bolts on the front trunnion. Then reinstall the guts, this takes a little jimmying and watch out for the degree pointer getting jammed up.

Once you have the guts installed in the front trunnion use a clamp to hold it in place, then install the rear trunion and clamp that in place as well.



By keeping everything clamped we can tighten down the bolts to the alignment phase and ensure that we are keeping everything in position, nothing should move after we tighten down the bolts.

Reinstall the motor at this point, alignment without the motor and belt installed is worthless.

Align by whatever your usual means is. I don't own PALS, or a 100 dollar aligning kit. I simply have a 15 dollar dial indicator shoved into a piece of wood. I get it to about .002ish and that's good enough.

Be careful when you tighten the trunnions down, the alignment can shift based on the force applied to the bolt head, I mix pulling the wrench with pushing the wrench to minimize the disturbance from this action.

Tighten the heck out of these bolts, my saw will move long before I get to the strip out the cast iron area of torque. While I want to caution you to not strip out the bolt holes, this is the area most people skimp on and is the cause of most alignment difficulties after bevel cuts.

Here is a 45 degree test cut I did after doing this procedure. I only had 1 side jointed so it's not sitting very well on the table top.



Re check your alignment after setting to 45 degrees. If it moved you didn't tighten it down enough. I cannot find a torque value recommend by anyone on tightening them. I would love a real number to give someone without ruining my saw to see what the max value is.
I have but see this http://lumberjocks.com/jocks/marcb/blog/7898

I'm probably not going to be hanging onto the contractor saw much longer.

It will be a sad day when it goes because it is a great saw that has been extremely enjoyable to work with. And a bunch of that is because I would sneak in a cut here and there with out any DC.
 

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Cleanup and finishing

With the guts removed and on the flat surface



You can detect of the 2 bars are out of alignment by attempting to rock them. This is similar to the Delta method but we rock the bars not a flat piece of wood on the bars.

If they are out of alignment clamp down the bars and loosen the 2 nuts on the rear side.



Once the 2 nuts are loosened, make sure no sawdust is jammed behind them, loosen both clamps then reclamp and double check that the arbor is 90 degrees to the flat surface with a small engineers square.

Once everything is lined up, tighten the heck out of both nuts.

Go back the the saw and clean the front trunnion. Both the U shaped area and the worm gear and the guide surfaces next to the worm gear are the main areas of concern. Get them good and clean and spray them down with a dry lube.

Install your good graded bolts with lock washers.



You'll notice that the grade 8 1 inch are a tad larger than the originals. This should not be a problem with the lock washer added to the mix. Install new cut washers these are thicker than regular washers and shouldn't distort (trunnion, cut washer, lockwasher, bolt head)

Loosely install the 2 bolts on the front trunnion. Then reinstall the guts, this takes a little jimmying and watch out for the degree pointer getting jammed up.

Once you have the guts installed in the front trunnion use a clamp to hold it in place, then install the rear trunion and clamp that in place as well.



By keeping everything clamped we can tighten down the bolts to the alignment phase and ensure that we are keeping everything in position, nothing should move after we tighten down the bolts.

Reinstall the motor at this point, alignment without the motor and belt installed is worthless.

Align by whatever your usual means is. I don't own PALS, or a 100 dollar aligning kit. I simply have a 15 dollar dial indicator shoved into a piece of wood. I get it to about .002ish and that's good enough.

Be careful when you tighten the trunnions down, the alignment can shift based on the force applied to the bolt head, I mix pulling the wrench with pushing the wrench to minimize the disturbance from this action.

Tighten the heck out of these bolts, my saw will move long before I get to the strip out the cast iron area of torque. While I want to caution you to not strip out the bolt holes, this is the area most people skimp on and is the cause of most alignment difficulties after bevel cuts.

Here is a 45 degree test cut I did after doing this procedure. I only had 1 side jointed so it's not sitting very well on the table top.



Re check your alignment after setting to 45 degrees. If it moved you didn't tighten it down enough. I cannot find a torque value recommend by anyone on tightening them. I would love a real number to give someone without ruining my saw to see what the max value is.
Oh comeon, you can't get rid of that old American made saw. Someday when you have a bunch of dadoes to cut you'll wish you had it so you don't have to break down the setup on the W-T. I have two Contractor's saws, a 10" delta, and a 9" Rockwell, the baby to yours, both American made.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Cleanup and finishing

With the guts removed and on the flat surface



You can detect of the 2 bars are out of alignment by attempting to rock them. This is similar to the Delta method but we rock the bars not a flat piece of wood on the bars.

If they are out of alignment clamp down the bars and loosen the 2 nuts on the rear side.



Once the 2 nuts are loosened, make sure no sawdust is jammed behind them, loosen both clamps then reclamp and double check that the arbor is 90 degrees to the flat surface with a small engineers square.

Once everything is lined up, tighten the heck out of both nuts.

Go back the the saw and clean the front trunnion. Both the U shaped area and the worm gear and the guide surfaces next to the worm gear are the main areas of concern. Get them good and clean and spray them down with a dry lube.

Install your good graded bolts with lock washers.



You'll notice that the grade 8 1 inch are a tad larger than the originals. This should not be a problem with the lock washer added to the mix. Install new cut washers these are thicker than regular washers and shouldn't distort (trunnion, cut washer, lockwasher, bolt head)

Loosely install the 2 bolts on the front trunnion. Then reinstall the guts, this takes a little jimmying and watch out for the degree pointer getting jammed up.

Once you have the guts installed in the front trunnion use a clamp to hold it in place, then install the rear trunion and clamp that in place as well.



By keeping everything clamped we can tighten down the bolts to the alignment phase and ensure that we are keeping everything in position, nothing should move after we tighten down the bolts.

Reinstall the motor at this point, alignment without the motor and belt installed is worthless.

Align by whatever your usual means is. I don't own PALS, or a 100 dollar aligning kit. I simply have a 15 dollar dial indicator shoved into a piece of wood. I get it to about .002ish and that's good enough.

Be careful when you tighten the trunnions down, the alignment can shift based on the force applied to the bolt head, I mix pulling the wrench with pushing the wrench to minimize the disturbance from this action.

Tighten the heck out of these bolts, my saw will move long before I get to the strip out the cast iron area of torque. While I want to caution you to not strip out the bolt holes, this is the area most people skimp on and is the cause of most alignment difficulties after bevel cuts.

Here is a 45 degree test cut I did after doing this procedure. I only had 1 side jointed so it's not sitting very well on the table top.



Re check your alignment after setting to 45 degrees. If it moved you didn't tighten it down enough. I cannot find a torque value recommend by anyone on tightening them. I would love a real number to give someone without ruining my saw to see what the max value is.
Your probably right, however I have limited space and lots of tools.

I wouldn't mind passing the saw onto someone getting started who needs to know what quality is before he gets sucked into modern tools.

Now I need to get into the shop to make new feather boards, since none of mine reach on the new saw (I knew there was a down side to that huge top)
 
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