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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Starting in the middle

I'm already a bit into this project and I'll be nibbling at it for several months. Here's a recap of what's happened so far:

This is what it will ultimately look like. We're not particularly big wine drinkers, so a small bay will just about hold our entire stock of booze. I haven't decided what to do with the doors, but this got me far enough for a cut list on the carcase and veneers. The point of this project is a.) to showcase some Pangapanga that the local yard was liquidating, b.) to test my resawing and veneering skill and c.) to use up some material that I've been accumulating.

My wife had asked for a new set of built-in cabinets in the basement. No sooner do I get home with two sheets of birch and a cut list than does she change her mind. Rather than horsing them back to the borg for a refund, I held on to them. Of course, one rogue 8×4 sheet will prevent access to everything in the garage, to say nothing of two sheets conspiring in tandem. So we definitely needed a project that would put them to good use.



Botanically related to Wenge, the local hardwood dealer was letting this stuff go for 50% off.



Resawn on the table saw using an itsy bitsy circular saw blade. Very thin, very fast and very easy on the motor when pushing through stuff that's as dense as concrete.



Fun with compasses and 1/4" MDF laying out curves for the patterns to make the template to make the…



Triple thicknesses of scrap wafer board to create a bending form for the inlays. My bandsaw still needs a new blade, so these were roughed with a jigsaw.



Even though I've watched it done on TV, this is actually the first time I've ever laminated a curve. Just to be totally off the wall, it's not even wood: Flat aluminum (1/8") and white exterior vinyl trim resawn down to 1/8". Does Gorilla Glue really grab on non-wood materials? We'll see how it turns out tomorrow morning.
 

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Starting in the middle

I'm already a bit into this project and I'll be nibbling at it for several months. Here's a recap of what's happened so far:

This is what it will ultimately look like. We're not particularly big wine drinkers, so a small bay will just about hold our entire stock of booze. I haven't decided what to do with the doors, but this got me far enough for a cut list on the carcase and veneers. The point of this project is a.) to showcase some Pangapanga that the local yard was liquidating, b.) to test my resawing and veneering skill and c.) to use up some material that I've been accumulating.

My wife had asked for a new set of built-in cabinets in the basement. No sooner do I get home with two sheets of birch and a cut list than does she change her mind. Rather than horsing them back to the borg for a refund, I held on to them. Of course, one rogue 8×4 sheet will prevent access to everything in the garage, to say nothing of two sheets conspiring in tandem. So we definitely needed a project that would put them to good use.



Botanically related to Wenge, the local hardwood dealer was letting this stuff go for 50% off.



Resawn on the table saw using an itsy bitsy circular saw blade. Very thin, very fast and very easy on the motor when pushing through stuff that's as dense as concrete.



Fun with compasses and 1/4" MDF laying out curves for the patterns to make the template to make the…



Triple thicknesses of scrap wafer board to create a bending form for the inlays. My bandsaw still needs a new blade, so these were roughed with a jigsaw.



Even though I've watched it done on TV, this is actually the first time I've ever laminated a curve. Just to be totally off the wall, it's not even wood: Flat aluminum (1/8") and white exterior vinyl trim resawn down to 1/8". Does Gorilla Glue really grab on non-wood materials? We'll see how it turns out tomorrow morning.
The design looks very nice and impressive. You may decide on the doors as you go along. I believe its a matter of time and you will be able to complete it.
 

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Starting in the middle

I'm already a bit into this project and I'll be nibbling at it for several months. Here's a recap of what's happened so far:

This is what it will ultimately look like. We're not particularly big wine drinkers, so a small bay will just about hold our entire stock of booze. I haven't decided what to do with the doors, but this got me far enough for a cut list on the carcase and veneers. The point of this project is a.) to showcase some Pangapanga that the local yard was liquidating, b.) to test my resawing and veneering skill and c.) to use up some material that I've been accumulating.

My wife had asked for a new set of built-in cabinets in the basement. No sooner do I get home with two sheets of birch and a cut list than does she change her mind. Rather than horsing them back to the borg for a refund, I held on to them. Of course, one rogue 8×4 sheet will prevent access to everything in the garage, to say nothing of two sheets conspiring in tandem. So we definitely needed a project that would put them to good use.



Botanically related to Wenge, the local hardwood dealer was letting this stuff go for 50% off.



Resawn on the table saw using an itsy bitsy circular saw blade. Very thin, very fast and very easy on the motor when pushing through stuff that's as dense as concrete.



Fun with compasses and 1/4" MDF laying out curves for the patterns to make the template to make the…



Triple thicknesses of scrap wafer board to create a bending form for the inlays. My bandsaw still needs a new blade, so these were roughed with a jigsaw.



Even though I've watched it done on TV, this is actually the first time I've ever laminated a curve. Just to be totally off the wall, it's not even wood: Flat aluminum (1/8") and white exterior vinyl trim resawn down to 1/8". Does Gorilla Glue really grab on non-wood materials? We'll see how it turns out tomorrow morning.
That design is just incredible! Is it yours?
I just love the lines on the legs and the design on the top.
I am anxious to see it finished.
I hope you share your dimensions and process with us.
Ellen
 

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Starting in the middle

I'm already a bit into this project and I'll be nibbling at it for several months. Here's a recap of what's happened so far:

This is what it will ultimately look like. We're not particularly big wine drinkers, so a small bay will just about hold our entire stock of booze. I haven't decided what to do with the doors, but this got me far enough for a cut list on the carcase and veneers. The point of this project is a.) to showcase some Pangapanga that the local yard was liquidating, b.) to test my resawing and veneering skill and c.) to use up some material that I've been accumulating.

My wife had asked for a new set of built-in cabinets in the basement. No sooner do I get home with two sheets of birch and a cut list than does she change her mind. Rather than horsing them back to the borg for a refund, I held on to them. Of course, one rogue 8×4 sheet will prevent access to everything in the garage, to say nothing of two sheets conspiring in tandem. So we definitely needed a project that would put them to good use.



Botanically related to Wenge, the local hardwood dealer was letting this stuff go for 50% off.



Resawn on the table saw using an itsy bitsy circular saw blade. Very thin, very fast and very easy on the motor when pushing through stuff that's as dense as concrete.



Fun with compasses and 1/4" MDF laying out curves for the patterns to make the template to make the…



Triple thicknesses of scrap wafer board to create a bending form for the inlays. My bandsaw still needs a new blade, so these were roughed with a jigsaw.



Even though I've watched it done on TV, this is actually the first time I've ever laminated a curve. Just to be totally off the wall, it's not even wood: Flat aluminum (1/8") and white exterior vinyl trim resawn down to 1/8". Does Gorilla Glue really grab on non-wood materials? We'll see how it turns out tomorrow morning.
Robert, I really like the design you have for the carcass. Very nice. I just finished designing and building a chest, coffee table and end table using Wenge. (8/4). Heavy, dense and brittle, but was beautiful when finished. Good luck…....you're off to a good start.
 

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Starting in the middle

I'm already a bit into this project and I'll be nibbling at it for several months. Here's a recap of what's happened so far:

This is what it will ultimately look like. We're not particularly big wine drinkers, so a small bay will just about hold our entire stock of booze. I haven't decided what to do with the doors, but this got me far enough for a cut list on the carcase and veneers. The point of this project is a.) to showcase some Pangapanga that the local yard was liquidating, b.) to test my resawing and veneering skill and c.) to use up some material that I've been accumulating.

My wife had asked for a new set of built-in cabinets in the basement. No sooner do I get home with two sheets of birch and a cut list than does she change her mind. Rather than horsing them back to the borg for a refund, I held on to them. Of course, one rogue 8×4 sheet will prevent access to everything in the garage, to say nothing of two sheets conspiring in tandem. So we definitely needed a project that would put them to good use.



Botanically related to Wenge, the local hardwood dealer was letting this stuff go for 50% off.



Resawn on the table saw using an itsy bitsy circular saw blade. Very thin, very fast and very easy on the motor when pushing through stuff that's as dense as concrete.



Fun with compasses and 1/4" MDF laying out curves for the patterns to make the template to make the…



Triple thicknesses of scrap wafer board to create a bending form for the inlays. My bandsaw still needs a new blade, so these were roughed with a jigsaw.



Even though I've watched it done on TV, this is actually the first time I've ever laminated a curve. Just to be totally off the wall, it's not even wood: Flat aluminum (1/8") and white exterior vinyl trim resawn down to 1/8". Does Gorilla Glue really grab on non-wood materials? We'll see how it turns out tomorrow morning.
Hi Robert What a bargin on the pangpanga. There is alot of second hand office furniture made from this wood and highly prized by the older generation some even collect the stuff the wood here in SA is also called partridge wood. The desgn tops cant wait to see finished piece. Idea doors opposite to the top.

Kind Regards Roger
 

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Starting in the middle

I'm already a bit into this project and I'll be nibbling at it for several months. Here's a recap of what's happened so far:

This is what it will ultimately look like. We're not particularly big wine drinkers, so a small bay will just about hold our entire stock of booze. I haven't decided what to do with the doors, but this got me far enough for a cut list on the carcase and veneers. The point of this project is a.) to showcase some Pangapanga that the local yard was liquidating, b.) to test my resawing and veneering skill and c.) to use up some material that I've been accumulating.

My wife had asked for a new set of built-in cabinets in the basement. No sooner do I get home with two sheets of birch and a cut list than does she change her mind. Rather than horsing them back to the borg for a refund, I held on to them. Of course, one rogue 8×4 sheet will prevent access to everything in the garage, to say nothing of two sheets conspiring in tandem. So we definitely needed a project that would put them to good use.



Botanically related to Wenge, the local hardwood dealer was letting this stuff go for 50% off.



Resawn on the table saw using an itsy bitsy circular saw blade. Very thin, very fast and very easy on the motor when pushing through stuff that's as dense as concrete.



Fun with compasses and 1/4" MDF laying out curves for the patterns to make the template to make the…



Triple thicknesses of scrap wafer board to create a bending form for the inlays. My bandsaw still needs a new blade, so these were roughed with a jigsaw.



Even though I've watched it done on TV, this is actually the first time I've ever laminated a curve. Just to be totally off the wall, it's not even wood: Flat aluminum (1/8") and white exterior vinyl trim resawn down to 1/8". Does Gorilla Glue really grab on non-wood materials? We'll see how it turns out tomorrow morning.
Unique design can't wait to see how it comes out.
 

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Starting in the middle

I'm already a bit into this project and I'll be nibbling at it for several months. Here's a recap of what's happened so far:

This is what it will ultimately look like. We're not particularly big wine drinkers, so a small bay will just about hold our entire stock of booze. I haven't decided what to do with the doors, but this got me far enough for a cut list on the carcase and veneers. The point of this project is a.) to showcase some Pangapanga that the local yard was liquidating, b.) to test my resawing and veneering skill and c.) to use up some material that I've been accumulating.

My wife had asked for a new set of built-in cabinets in the basement. No sooner do I get home with two sheets of birch and a cut list than does she change her mind. Rather than horsing them back to the borg for a refund, I held on to them. Of course, one rogue 8×4 sheet will prevent access to everything in the garage, to say nothing of two sheets conspiring in tandem. So we definitely needed a project that would put them to good use.



Botanically related to Wenge, the local hardwood dealer was letting this stuff go for 50% off.



Resawn on the table saw using an itsy bitsy circular saw blade. Very thin, very fast and very easy on the motor when pushing through stuff that's as dense as concrete.



Fun with compasses and 1/4" MDF laying out curves for the patterns to make the template to make the…



Triple thicknesses of scrap wafer board to create a bending form for the inlays. My bandsaw still needs a new blade, so these were roughed with a jigsaw.



Even though I've watched it done on TV, this is actually the first time I've ever laminated a curve. Just to be totally off the wall, it's not even wood: Flat aluminum (1/8") and white exterior vinyl trim resawn down to 1/8". Does Gorilla Glue really grab on non-wood materials? We'll see how it turns out tomorrow morning.
Great design. Can't wait to see the build.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Top laminates and curved inlays

Used the old trick of a straight board and a router to get a glue-able edge on the Panga laminates for the top. One set is gluing already and we'll move on to the next tomorrow.



Pulled open the form and revealed my curved inlay stock for the top also.



I was worried that the aluminum would be too springy, but the glue held just fine. I only need to get two arcs out of this, so there's plenty of room to goof the first cut.
 

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Top laminates and curved inlays

Used the old trick of a straight board and a router to get a glue-able edge on the Panga laminates for the top. One set is gluing already and we'll move on to the next tomorrow.



Pulled open the form and revealed my curved inlay stock for the top also.



I was worried that the aluminum would be too springy, but the glue held just fine. I only need to get two arcs out of this, so there's plenty of room to goof the first cut.
interesting ready for more details seems very cool
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Dances with (de)laminations

New bandsaw blades finally arrived, so it's time to transform one thick inlay into several thin inlays.



One small void deep in the middle of the lamination caused one of the arcs to open up. Theoretically, I could superglue this and put it back in the form. We'll hold onto this as a spare in case I goof one of the others.

The design also calls for two straight inlays, so I cut the vinyl for those before changing the saw setup. Stupid me, I received a sharp reminder of what happens when one's sacrificial push block gets too chewed up. Time to chuck this one and make a new one!



Good thing vinyl is so soft and I was standing off to the side, as this flew across the garage pretty fast. No harm, no foul. Learn a lesson and game on.



Another nasty surprise when I started laying out the arcs on the substrate for the top: Major potato chippage (the far side of this piece is flat on the bench) and a delamination the size of the San Andreas had opened up on one side. Not a battle I want to fight and I've got a spare piece that's big enough, so this one will probably get ripped up as ribs when I put the top together.



After transferring the layout lines, I can place the arcs in their final position. This'll get me paper templates to rough cut the Panga veneers from an earlier post and the hourglass shaped padauk in the middle.



Thanks for all the encouragement. This'll be a long journey into the night and it's nice to have you all along for the trip.
 

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Dances with (de)laminations

New bandsaw blades finally arrived, so it's time to transform one thick inlay into several thin inlays.



One small void deep in the middle of the lamination caused one of the arcs to open up. Theoretically, I could superglue this and put it back in the form. We'll hold onto this as a spare in case I goof one of the others.

The design also calls for two straight inlays, so I cut the vinyl for those before changing the saw setup. Stupid me, I received a sharp reminder of what happens when one's sacrificial push block gets too chewed up. Time to chuck this one and make a new one!



Good thing vinyl is so soft and I was standing off to the side, as this flew across the garage pretty fast. No harm, no foul. Learn a lesson and game on.



Another nasty surprise when I started laying out the arcs on the substrate for the top: Major potato chippage (the far side of this piece is flat on the bench) and a delamination the size of the San Andreas had opened up on one side. Not a battle I want to fight and I've got a spare piece that's big enough, so this one will probably get ripped up as ribs when I put the top together.



After transferring the layout lines, I can place the arcs in their final position. This'll get me paper templates to rough cut the Panga veneers from an earlier post and the hourglass shaped padauk in the middle.



Thanks for all the encouragement. This'll be a long journey into the night and it's nice to have you all along for the trip.
keep on keeping on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
All I want for Christmas...

...is a proper vacuum press. One of my cauls or clamps must have slipped overnight, for I woke this morning to find my table top veneers curled and lifting off the substrate.



My instinct immediately told me this is one for the fireplace, but I'll put the matches aside for a few days while I calm down…this is supposed to be fun, after all. a.) I've only got a few boards invested in this piece so far and b.) I don't want to spend the rest of my life staring at a hass-aft repair-especially when bookmatched grain is involved!-on a table top. All the same, a few days of calm reflection might turn up a less drastic solution.

$#^*@!
 
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