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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Disassembly

As some of you know I recently acquired an Oliver 232 table saw. The saw was built sometime between Feb and Sept 1953. It is 3hp 3ph and weighs in around 1200#. It was purchased through a local auction for the sum of $125.

Today I began with the disassembly and cleaning. I removed the table, 200# gone right there. Luckily my weight lifting neighbor was home and gave me a hand removing it. After the top was off I began removing the motor, motor raising mechanism. The motor sits on a plate that is raised with a pinon gear and shaft, it is aligned with dovetailed ways. Its a nice assembly. Here she is with her top off.



The motor came out next, about 100# gone there. It was set on the bench for later cleaning and bearing replacement.



The table with most of the internal parts.



Next came a light wire brushing with a knotted brush on a 4" grinder. It made fairly quick work of removing the paint and rust. I did one side and called it a day.


Tomorrow, hopefully, I will get a cherry picker lift to remove the trunnion asembly. My guess is it is somewhere around 250-300#.

 

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Disassembly

As some of you know I recently acquired an Oliver 232 table saw. The saw was built sometime between Feb and Sept 1953. It is 3hp 3ph and weighs in around 1200#. It was purchased through a local auction for the sum of $125.

Today I began with the disassembly and cleaning. I removed the table, 200# gone right there. Luckily my weight lifting neighbor was home and gave me a hand removing it. After the top was off I began removing the motor, motor raising mechanism. The motor sits on a plate that is raised with a pinon gear and shaft, it is aligned with dovetailed ways. Its a nice assembly. Here she is with her top off.



The motor came out next, about 100# gone there. It was set on the bench for later cleaning and bearing replacement.



The table with most of the internal parts.



Next came a light wire brushing with a knotted brush on a 4" grinder. It made fairly quick work of removing the paint and rust. I did one side and called it a day.


Tomorrow, hopefully, I will get a cherry picker lift to remove the trunnion asembly. My guess is it is somewhere around 250-300#.

Great show and tell. These old Olivers are real beauties when they get a little TLC. I hope you find a fence and miter before the redo is done. Rand
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Disassembly

As some of you know I recently acquired an Oliver 232 table saw. The saw was built sometime between Feb and Sept 1953. It is 3hp 3ph and weighs in around 1200#. It was purchased through a local auction for the sum of $125.

Today I began with the disassembly and cleaning. I removed the table, 200# gone right there. Luckily my weight lifting neighbor was home and gave me a hand removing it. After the top was off I began removing the motor, motor raising mechanism. The motor sits on a plate that is raised with a pinon gear and shaft, it is aligned with dovetailed ways. Its a nice assembly. Here she is with her top off.



The motor came out next, about 100# gone there. It was set on the bench for later cleaning and bearing replacement.



The table with most of the internal parts.



Next came a light wire brushing with a knotted brush on a 4" grinder. It made fairly quick work of removing the paint and rust. I did one side and called it a day.


Tomorrow, hopefully, I will get a cherry picker lift to remove the trunnion asembly. My guess is it is somewhere around 250-300#.

Both of those are hard to come by and when found command a premium price. There is a fence currently on fleebay listed at $450, I don't think I will pay that but ya never know. If I have to I will put a Biesemeyer on it temporarily if I have to so I can use the saw. My other major expense is going to be blades and a dado set. Have you priced a 12" dado? Talk about sticker shock
 

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Disassembly

As some of you know I recently acquired an Oliver 232 table saw. The saw was built sometime between Feb and Sept 1953. It is 3hp 3ph and weighs in around 1200#. It was purchased through a local auction for the sum of $125.

Today I began with the disassembly and cleaning. I removed the table, 200# gone right there. Luckily my weight lifting neighbor was home and gave me a hand removing it. After the top was off I began removing the motor, motor raising mechanism. The motor sits on a plate that is raised with a pinon gear and shaft, it is aligned with dovetailed ways. Its a nice assembly. Here she is with her top off.



The motor came out next, about 100# gone there. It was set on the bench for later cleaning and bearing replacement.



The table with most of the internal parts.



Next came a light wire brushing with a knotted brush on a 4" grinder. It made fairly quick work of removing the paint and rust. I did one side and called it a day.


Tomorrow, hopefully, I will get a cherry picker lift to remove the trunnion asembly. My guess is it is somewhere around 250-300#.

Looks great Ken.

Thanks for keeping us posted.

Jerry
 

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Disassembly

As some of you know I recently acquired an Oliver 232 table saw. The saw was built sometime between Feb and Sept 1953. It is 3hp 3ph and weighs in around 1200#. It was purchased through a local auction for the sum of $125.

Today I began with the disassembly and cleaning. I removed the table, 200# gone right there. Luckily my weight lifting neighbor was home and gave me a hand removing it. After the top was off I began removing the motor, motor raising mechanism. The motor sits on a plate that is raised with a pinon gear and shaft, it is aligned with dovetailed ways. Its a nice assembly. Here she is with her top off.



The motor came out next, about 100# gone there. It was set on the bench for later cleaning and bearing replacement.



The table with most of the internal parts.



Next came a light wire brushing with a knotted brush on a 4" grinder. It made fairly quick work of removing the paint and rust. I did one side and called it a day.


Tomorrow, hopefully, I will get a cherry picker lift to remove the trunnion asembly. My guess is it is somewhere around 250-300#.

Ken,
This looks like a fun winter project.
Can't wait to see your progress : )

Lisa
 

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Disassembly

As some of you know I recently acquired an Oliver 232 table saw. The saw was built sometime between Feb and Sept 1953. It is 3hp 3ph and weighs in around 1200#. It was purchased through a local auction for the sum of $125.

Today I began with the disassembly and cleaning. I removed the table, 200# gone right there. Luckily my weight lifting neighbor was home and gave me a hand removing it. After the top was off I began removing the motor, motor raising mechanism. The motor sits on a plate that is raised with a pinon gear and shaft, it is aligned with dovetailed ways. Its a nice assembly. Here she is with her top off.



The motor came out next, about 100# gone there. It was set on the bench for later cleaning and bearing replacement.



The table with most of the internal parts.



Next came a light wire brushing with a knotted brush on a 4" grinder. It made fairly quick work of removing the paint and rust. I did one side and called it a day.


Tomorrow, hopefully, I will get a cherry picker lift to remove the trunnion asembly. My guess is it is somewhere around 250-300#.

Ken, let me tell you if I were doing this, I'd be freaking out about putting the saw back together right now. You're brave.

I have used an oliver with the rack and pinion fences. you can't beat them, for $450 you will not be disappointed, plus, the 232 will look awesome with the original equipment.
 

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Disassembly

As some of you know I recently acquired an Oliver 232 table saw. The saw was built sometime between Feb and Sept 1953. It is 3hp 3ph and weighs in around 1200#. It was purchased through a local auction for the sum of $125.

Today I began with the disassembly and cleaning. I removed the table, 200# gone right there. Luckily my weight lifting neighbor was home and gave me a hand removing it. After the top was off I began removing the motor, motor raising mechanism. The motor sits on a plate that is raised with a pinon gear and shaft, it is aligned with dovetailed ways. Its a nice assembly. Here she is with her top off.



The motor came out next, about 100# gone there. It was set on the bench for later cleaning and bearing replacement.



The table with most of the internal parts.



Next came a light wire brushing with a knotted brush on a 4" grinder. It made fairly quick work of removing the paint and rust. I did one side and called it a day.


Tomorrow, hopefully, I will get a cherry picker lift to remove the trunnion asembly. My guess is it is somewhere around 250-300#.

This is my kind of project. Good luck!!! You know I'll be following along. What a beast!!!
 

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Disassembly

As some of you know I recently acquired an Oliver 232 table saw. The saw was built sometime between Feb and Sept 1953. It is 3hp 3ph and weighs in around 1200#. It was purchased through a local auction for the sum of $125.

Today I began with the disassembly and cleaning. I removed the table, 200# gone right there. Luckily my weight lifting neighbor was home and gave me a hand removing it. After the top was off I began removing the motor, motor raising mechanism. The motor sits on a plate that is raised with a pinon gear and shaft, it is aligned with dovetailed ways. Its a nice assembly. Here she is with her top off.



The motor came out next, about 100# gone there. It was set on the bench for later cleaning and bearing replacement.



The table with most of the internal parts.



Next came a light wire brushing with a knotted brush on a 4" grinder. It made fairly quick work of removing the paint and rust. I did one side and called it a day.


Tomorrow, hopefully, I will get a cherry picker lift to remove the trunnion asembly. My guess is it is somewhere around 250-300#.

An Oliver for $125, I may temporarily move to California! With this starting price you will have a tough time
going to far wrong on the finished saw. There is one listed at a reduced price for $3,200. I am having a
tough time here wiping the drool off my keyboard. It looks like you have a week or two of fun ahead of
you on the clean up, painting and assembly, I would offer help, but this is not a machine I know anything
about, except that it is very strong. Hope you have fun with the restoration and the operation.

As ever, Gus the 71 yr young laborer, tryilng to become a carpenters apprentice.
 

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Disassembly

As some of you know I recently acquired an Oliver 232 table saw. The saw was built sometime between Feb and Sept 1953. It is 3hp 3ph and weighs in around 1200#. It was purchased through a local auction for the sum of $125.

Today I began with the disassembly and cleaning. I removed the table, 200# gone right there. Luckily my weight lifting neighbor was home and gave me a hand removing it. After the top was off I began removing the motor, motor raising mechanism. The motor sits on a plate that is raised with a pinon gear and shaft, it is aligned with dovetailed ways. Its a nice assembly. Here she is with her top off.



The motor came out next, about 100# gone there. It was set on the bench for later cleaning and bearing replacement.



The table with most of the internal parts.



Next came a light wire brushing with a knotted brush on a 4" grinder. It made fairly quick work of removing the paint and rust. I did one side and called it a day.


Tomorrow, hopefully, I will get a cherry picker lift to remove the trunnion asembly. My guess is it is somewhere around 250-300#.

Wow.

Ken ?

Thanks for posting the only kind of porn that-IMHO-belongs on this site :)

I'll be watching with rapt attention. I'd LOVE to be able to tackle a project like this !
 

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Disassembly

As some of you know I recently acquired an Oliver 232 table saw. The saw was built sometime between Feb and Sept 1953. It is 3hp 3ph and weighs in around 1200#. It was purchased through a local auction for the sum of $125.

Today I began with the disassembly and cleaning. I removed the table, 200# gone right there. Luckily my weight lifting neighbor was home and gave me a hand removing it. After the top was off I began removing the motor, motor raising mechanism. The motor sits on a plate that is raised with a pinon gear and shaft, it is aligned with dovetailed ways. Its a nice assembly. Here she is with her top off.



The motor came out next, about 100# gone there. It was set on the bench for later cleaning and bearing replacement.



The table with most of the internal parts.



Next came a light wire brushing with a knotted brush on a 4" grinder. It made fairly quick work of removing the paint and rust. I did one side and called it a day.


Tomorrow, hopefully, I will get a cherry picker lift to remove the trunnion asembly. My guess is it is somewhere around 250-300#.

i know, if it turns out like his lathe, we are going to have some fun watching the progress.
 
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Disassembly

As some of you know I recently acquired an Oliver 232 table saw. The saw was built sometime between Feb and Sept 1953. It is 3hp 3ph and weighs in around 1200#. It was purchased through a local auction for the sum of $125.

Today I began with the disassembly and cleaning. I removed the table, 200# gone right there. Luckily my weight lifting neighbor was home and gave me a hand removing it. After the top was off I began removing the motor, motor raising mechanism. The motor sits on a plate that is raised with a pinon gear and shaft, it is aligned with dovetailed ways. Its a nice assembly. Here she is with her top off.



The motor came out next, about 100# gone there. It was set on the bench for later cleaning and bearing replacement.



The table with most of the internal parts.



Next came a light wire brushing with a knotted brush on a 4" grinder. It made fairly quick work of removing the paint and rust. I did one side and called it a day.


Tomorrow, hopefully, I will get a cherry picker lift to remove the trunnion asembly. My guess is it is somewhere around 250-300#.

Thats going to be a great user saw once you is finish.
 

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Disassembly

As some of you know I recently acquired an Oliver 232 table saw. The saw was built sometime between Feb and Sept 1953. It is 3hp 3ph and weighs in around 1200#. It was purchased through a local auction for the sum of $125.

Today I began with the disassembly and cleaning. I removed the table, 200# gone right there. Luckily my weight lifting neighbor was home and gave me a hand removing it. After the top was off I began removing the motor, motor raising mechanism. The motor sits on a plate that is raised with a pinon gear and shaft, it is aligned with dovetailed ways. Its a nice assembly. Here she is with her top off.



The motor came out next, about 100# gone there. It was set on the bench for later cleaning and bearing replacement.



The table with most of the internal parts.



Next came a light wire brushing with a knotted brush on a 4" grinder. It made fairly quick work of removing the paint and rust. I did one side and called it a day.


Tomorrow, hopefully, I will get a cherry picker lift to remove the trunnion asembly. My guess is it is somewhere around 250-300#.

Any chance to get these photos updated?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sanding, filler and motor tear down

I have been working feverishly on this saw. I have spent quite a few hours wire brushing the castings getting ready for paint. After the majority of the paint and old filler was removed I had to borrow a lift to get the trunnion casting removed. It weighs about 100# and not wanting to injury an already sore back I felt it was safer.






I have applied 2 coats of filler and am ready to do the final sanding. Here she is as of today.



The motor came apart fairly easily. I am replacing all the bearings in the machine. Even though it appears the motor bearings were replaced at some point I do not know the history of the saw and being that the motor is out and the saw apart to me its cheap insurance.







Removing the arbor half did make me pucker a little. Last thing I wanted to do was bend or crack it. But it came off without having to place a wrench on the puller. I screwed it in by hand and off it came.



I removed the key and went after the front cover.


Then came time to remove the front cover and rotor. Slid out without an issue



More puckering




All done. New bearings have been ordered and should be here in a few days. Will update soon as I start painting!!
 

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Sanding, filler and motor tear down

I have been working feverishly on this saw. I have spent quite a few hours wire brushing the castings getting ready for paint. After the majority of the paint and old filler was removed I had to borrow a lift to get the trunnion casting removed. It weighs about 100# and not wanting to injury an already sore back I felt it was safer.






I have applied 2 coats of filler and am ready to do the final sanding. Here she is as of today.



The motor came apart fairly easily. I am replacing all the bearings in the machine. Even though it appears the motor bearings were replaced at some point I do not know the history of the saw and being that the motor is out and the saw apart to me its cheap insurance.







Removing the arbor half did make me pucker a little. Last thing I wanted to do was bend or crack it. But it came off without having to place a wrench on the puller. I screwed it in by hand and off it came.



I removed the key and went after the front cover.


Then came time to remove the front cover and rotor. Slid out without an issue



More puckering




All done. New bearings have been ordered and should be here in a few days. Will update soon as I start painting!!
A TOTAL teardown !

You DAWG !!!

This is going to be one sweet piece of hardware. Glad you're bringing us along for the ride !!
 

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Sanding, filler and motor tear down

I have been working feverishly on this saw. I have spent quite a few hours wire brushing the castings getting ready for paint. After the majority of the paint and old filler was removed I had to borrow a lift to get the trunnion casting removed. It weighs about 100# and not wanting to injury an already sore back I felt it was safer.






I have applied 2 coats of filler and am ready to do the final sanding. Here she is as of today.



The motor came apart fairly easily. I am replacing all the bearings in the machine. Even though it appears the motor bearings were replaced at some point I do not know the history of the saw and being that the motor is out and the saw apart to me its cheap insurance.







Removing the arbor half did make me pucker a little. Last thing I wanted to do was bend or crack it. But it came off without having to place a wrench on the puller. I screwed it in by hand and off it came.



I removed the key and went after the front cover.


Then came time to remove the front cover and rotor. Slid out without an issue



More puckering




All done. New bearings have been ordered and should be here in a few days. Will update soon as I start painting!!
Thanks for all the photos. It's like being there..except for the sweat and anguish. Can't wait for more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Sanding, filler and motor tear down

I have been working feverishly on this saw. I have spent quite a few hours wire brushing the castings getting ready for paint. After the majority of the paint and old filler was removed I had to borrow a lift to get the trunnion casting removed. It weighs about 100# and not wanting to injury an already sore back I felt it was safer.






I have applied 2 coats of filler and am ready to do the final sanding. Here she is as of today.



The motor came apart fairly easily. I am replacing all the bearings in the machine. Even though it appears the motor bearings were replaced at some point I do not know the history of the saw and being that the motor is out and the saw apart to me its cheap insurance.







Removing the arbor half did make me pucker a little. Last thing I wanted to do was bend or crack it. But it came off without having to place a wrench on the puller. I screwed it in by hand and off it came.



I removed the key and went after the front cover.


Then came time to remove the front cover and rotor. Slid out without an issue



More puckering




All done. New bearings have been ordered and should be here in a few days. Will update soon as I start painting!!
As Mike Holmes would say, "If you're gonna do it, do it right the first time"
 

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Sanding, filler and motor tear down

I have been working feverishly on this saw. I have spent quite a few hours wire brushing the castings getting ready for paint. After the majority of the paint and old filler was removed I had to borrow a lift to get the trunnion casting removed. It weighs about 100# and not wanting to injury an already sore back I felt it was safer.






I have applied 2 coats of filler and am ready to do the final sanding. Here she is as of today.



The motor came apart fairly easily. I am replacing all the bearings in the machine. Even though it appears the motor bearings were replaced at some point I do not know the history of the saw and being that the motor is out and the saw apart to me its cheap insurance.







Removing the arbor half did make me pucker a little. Last thing I wanted to do was bend or crack it. But it came off without having to place a wrench on the puller. I screwed it in by hand and off it came.



I removed the key and went after the front cover.


Then came time to remove the front cover and rotor. Slid out without an issue



More puckering




All done. New bearings have been ordered and should be here in a few days. Will update soon as I start painting!!
What a hog - in a good way. That beast couldn't vibrate if it had to!
 

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Sanding, filler and motor tear down

I have been working feverishly on this saw. I have spent quite a few hours wire brushing the castings getting ready for paint. After the majority of the paint and old filler was removed I had to borrow a lift to get the trunnion casting removed. It weighs about 100# and not wanting to injury an already sore back I felt it was safer.






I have applied 2 coats of filler and am ready to do the final sanding. Here she is as of today.



The motor came apart fairly easily. I am replacing all the bearings in the machine. Even though it appears the motor bearings were replaced at some point I do not know the history of the saw and being that the motor is out and the saw apart to me its cheap insurance.







Removing the arbor half did make me pucker a little. Last thing I wanted to do was bend or crack it. But it came off without having to place a wrench on the puller. I screwed it in by hand and off it came.



I removed the key and went after the front cover.


Then came time to remove the front cover and rotor. Slid out without an issue



More puckering




All done. New bearings have been ordered and should be here in a few days. Will update soon as I start painting!!
I want to see the mobile base for that baby! Rand
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Sanding, filler and motor tear down

I have been working feverishly on this saw. I have spent quite a few hours wire brushing the castings getting ready for paint. After the majority of the paint and old filler was removed I had to borrow a lift to get the trunnion casting removed. It weighs about 100# and not wanting to injury an already sore back I felt it was safer.






I have applied 2 coats of filler and am ready to do the final sanding. Here she is as of today.



The motor came apart fairly easily. I am replacing all the bearings in the machine. Even though it appears the motor bearings were replaced at some point I do not know the history of the saw and being that the motor is out and the saw apart to me its cheap insurance.







Removing the arbor half did make me pucker a little. Last thing I wanted to do was bend or crack it. But it came off without having to place a wrench on the puller. I screwed it in by hand and off it came.



I removed the key and went after the front cover.


Then came time to remove the front cover and rotor. Slid out without an issue



More puckering




All done. New bearings have been ordered and should be here in a few days. Will update soon as I start painting!!
I am still in the planning stage for the mobile base. I think it will be 1/4" thick 2" angle iron welded at 45 degrees at the corners. To that I will weld a bracket for 4" heavy duty casters.
 
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13,555 Posts
Sanding, filler and motor tear down

I have been working feverishly on this saw. I have spent quite a few hours wire brushing the castings getting ready for paint. After the majority of the paint and old filler was removed I had to borrow a lift to get the trunnion casting removed. It weighs about 100# and not wanting to injury an already sore back I felt it was safer.






I have applied 2 coats of filler and am ready to do the final sanding. Here she is as of today.



The motor came apart fairly easily. I am replacing all the bearings in the machine. Even though it appears the motor bearings were replaced at some point I do not know the history of the saw and being that the motor is out and the saw apart to me its cheap insurance.







Removing the arbor half did make me pucker a little. Last thing I wanted to do was bend or crack it. But it came off without having to place a wrench on the puller. I screwed it in by hand and off it came.



I removed the key and went after the front cover.


Then came time to remove the front cover and rotor. Slid out without an issue



More puckering




All done. New bearings have been ordered and should be here in a few days. Will update soon as I start painting!!
Ken, thats a monster of a table saw.
 
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