LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Hello all, I was wondering if anyone could provide some insight on Stanley planes from 1900-1920. I've been looking to buy an old #5 as a first plane to learn about the process. Is it common to find these with 90% or more of the japanning remaining? I know there are copies out there, but i've done my research on what to look for and the ones I've come across have all the proper characteristics, but they're in excellent shape. I just don't want to buy a reproduction. After 100 years can they be that well taken care of? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,645 Posts
I have a No. 7 with patent date at 1864, which based on some online dating tool puts it at around 1880. Besides a little rust on the frog, the plane has I'd say 99% of its original japanning on it…at least from what I can tell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,400 Posts
i have several pre wwII stanley hand planes with 90 to 95 % japanning left, i am a hugh fan of old stanleys, they are easy to get working as long as there isn't to much rust or pitting. the only thing i have upgraded are my blades, a nice thick hock blade and you can throw up really thin shavings.as for price that will depend on the condition, but i haven't paided more then 40 or 45 bucks for mine, then a little tlc and you have a great plane for life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
"After 100 years can they be that well taken care of?"

If a hand plane has been used for the past 100 years chances are great that it is in great shape. However, it is usually that the plane has not seen the light of day for decades or longer.

Aside from rust or a pitted sole, these guys respond quickly to a little TLC. And there is nothing like the gentle sound of a well tuned hand plane gracefully gliding across a board, peeling off the thinnest possible ribbons of wood.

It's a wonderful experience. And most #5's are a bargain in the $20-$30 range. Just avoid one that has seen a lot of corrosion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the information. This is the one I've been looking at, it has the correct patent dates, beautiful rosewood tote and knob, correct lateral adjuster, and original iron (as far as I can tell), and almost all the japanning reamains. I wouldn't mind if some more experienced eyes took a look, but please don't take it, I'm attempting to buy my first plane here. Thanks.
http://cgi.ebay.com/VINTAGE-STANLEY-BAILEY-5-PLANE-BEAUTIFUL-LOW-KNOB_W0QQitemZ160396173201QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item25585b5f91
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
815 Posts
I have a number of Stanley planes in my shop (I am not a collector…I am not a collector) and This one looks great. It has the look of a restored plane, but unless you're a purist collector, that's not an issue. They are great tools in the shop. If they look good, too, so much the better. I know some will say it's good to replace the blade with a thicker one, and no doubt that's a good idea, I've been using them with the original blades & they work just fine. I've never felt the need to buy a new high end plane because of how well they work. -SST
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top