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Reality Check

This entry is a little on the philosophical side. It is about expectation and reality (one of which is quite easy to achieve).

I guess that each of us is entitled to become good at something in our lives if we work hard and I can't complain as I think I was able to become a pretty good boat builder. The trouble is I want more. I want to be a pretty good marqueteur now …. but I want to be able to start at 60+ and still achieve it. We're just never satisfied are we.

I took photos of some of my cuts as I was working on my jewellery box today and as a practice in humility and as a reality caution to others with similar aspirations, I will share them with you along with a few excuses / reasons for the results.

These are what qualify in my world as good cuts (in a packet of three layers of 1/16" Araracanga). I was as careful as I feel I can be and had good light. The curves are smooth and the cuts are close to the line (1/100") and they would be just fine in Boulle or painting in wood styles but I'm doing piece by piece here. My best is borderline acceptable. My respect for Patrice is growing by the minute.

In the first one, my blade is getting dull and it is well out of the "good" range. My standard of "good" is based on how much red line shows inside of the cut. That signifies that the piece is too big and may not fit. Red line outside, while no better from a cutting quality standpoint, is preferable because the piece will fit and the error can be hidden relatively easily with mastic. The wavy line at the bottom is evidence of the dull blade. Araracanga is very hard and eats blades.

Art Font Pattern Rectangle Paint


The second is with a fresh blade and is much better. I have to accept that this as about as good as it gets for me.

Textile Art Font Wood Pattern


The third is in between, about my average ability. When I was cutting this, I thought it was near perfect. Even looking at it without enlargement it looks very good to me. (here comes one of those excuses) I think it may be more of an eyesight issue than a dexterity issue.

Textile Rectangle Wood Art Pattern


When I have cut piece by piece in the past, I have had better results and had actually started to think I was getting to be a quite acceptable cutter but when I stepped into the ring with these thick, very hard veneers all the rules seemed to change. Here are some of my early observations about this material.

1) Cutting: It seems that these veneers, besides being thicker are a quantum step harder than even the hardest sliced veneers I have used in the past. I wonder if this has to do with the extreme soaking / boiling etc. administered to the logs before slicing. It seems to be much harder to follow a fine line on the sawn veneer packets.

2) Fitting: In thinner sliced material, when you need to "squeeze" a slightly oversize piece in, The piece and its background both seem to give a little and you can sort of mash it in. Not so much with a 1/16" Ebony ground and a 1/16" Araracanga piece. If it is too big, you file it down or re-cut it.

3) Blade damage Thick sawn veneer seems to be harder on blades, not only in terms of dulling faster, but also in twisting the blade. This may again pertain to their hardness.

Here's an example from yesterday. I had just changed to a new blade. I started at the hole on the left, cut the arc at the top, and went back and did the vein in the petal. Then I went back to the right end of the arc and started to do a rotation away from the piece to get a sharp corner. As I started the rotation, I lost my grip on the piece and it swung freely (gravity) about 180 degrees. This was in the middle of the blade, not at an end. As you can see, the blade was toast. It was absolutely impossible to follow any kind of line at all with it. Again, I have done this more times than I want to admit in the sliced veneer packets and, while the blade was compromised, I have never seen this dramatic of a change before.

Vertebrate Mammal Wood Art Fawn


I won't go on with this little rant except to say that as a hobbyist who came to marquetry after retirement I have to temper my expectations with a good dose of reality and cut myself a little slack if I want to enjoy my hobby. It is a good life lesson for me and I don't mind sharing it. When all assembled, filled, and polished, this piece will look very good to the average onlooker and I have to be happy with that. Another marqueteur, or anyone with a magnifying glass, won't be so easily fooled.

Thanks for looking in

Paul
I have been thinking about trying my hand at marquetry and your latest project was just the push I needed to move forward.

Thanks for taking time to share your work and your trials. If you are like many of us, one needs new challenges to keep ourselves motivated and to expand our knowledge. The ones that never say never and anything is doable.

I like that.

P.S. I use these "Mag-Safe Whole Lens Magnifying safety glasses":http://www.envirosafetyproducts.com/magnifying-safety-glasses-magnifying-safety-glass.htmls. You can get them in several different magnifications, and they fit really well.
 

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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
 

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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
I see patience and a beautiful project developing made of small pieces that make my eyes water just watching .
You have the patience of a saint and a skilled and seasoned craftsman .
I am starting to understand why thick veneer is of benefit in a project with small pieces like this that are just slightly larger than sawdust .
Sand Shading is interesting and is something to keep in mind as it may be useful elsewhere.

Klaus
 

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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
I wouldn't want to try this but I sure am enjoying watching your progress..
 

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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
Very nice Paul, You sure have improved since the wine box you brought to class..
 

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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
When I see all those little parts in that tray my mind goes blank too much for me. Very interesting blog keep them coming I am enjoying every one.
 

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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
Ah, Pye defined craftsmanship as the workmanship of risk.

In other words, you start to build, and the more time (and money) you have invested, the greater the cost of a mistake.

whether you know it or not, yer into that process.

Have fun and make it work buddy!

Eric
 

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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
Paul,

It certainly is coming along nicely. I'm glad I can enlarge these pictures on the computer though, or I probably couldn't see such tiny pieces!

L/W
 

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In Loving Memory
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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
Thanks for that lesson on sand shading Paul. It looks like you have completely overcome your earlier cutting problems just as I thought you would.The piece you are working on is absolutely stunning. Your color choices could not be better to show off the design. I have to admit that I find it scary seeing those tiny pieces and sand shading them to boot. I can see that 1/16" thick veneer helps with that, but I am wondering if that will be possible with the thin veneers. I also found your lamination very interesting, especially that the glue held in spite of the heat. I am enjoying your blog immensely both to see this beautiful work emerge and also to learn.
 

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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
I'm enjoying following along and trying to get the gist of this. The patience this requires is incredible.
 

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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
Stunning work Paul.
Just stunning.
Thanks for showing us all the steps.

Steve
 

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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
Thanks for this latest instalment. As a real beginner, I appreciate seeing the marquetry process unfold in each post.
 

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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
Looks like things are coming along very nicely Paul.
 

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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
You are the marquetry master Paul
 

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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
Paul, looks like you are making great progress. I thought that you had successfully laminated veneers together in a previous project? Regardless I remember Patrick saying you needed both heat and moisture to reverse HHG, in this case it looks like you are ok because you have the heat but the moisture is not sufficient to cause it to let go. Thanks for the video on your shading technique, I have to get a higher capacity burner because I can't seem to get the sand hot enough to use the spoon technique, even with the thin veneers I have used so far. I hope you are right that the severity of the shading will be lessened with surface sanding. I'm crossing my fingers and my toes!
 

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Sand Shading and Organization

With my colors mostly decided I went about cutting the pieces and dividing them into two groups. One group contained all the "universal" pieces. Those are the pieces that occur in all nine panels. The were assembled in one tray while the pieces that differ from flower to flower were organized in another tray. This second group includes the flower parts themselves and the parts of the leaves that directly contact the flowers. As each flower is different so are the contacting pieces.

The universal tray is mostly the green Poplar leaves and I had a little problem there in that my Poplar was not as thick as the other veneer. It is actually quite thick at 1/28" but that's just not enough. I decided to experiment with laminating two layers. I knew this would work fine as I've done it before but I wasn't sure about the heat of sand shading it.

This is what the laminated pieces look like cut.

Wood Hardwood Font Fashion accessory Tool


Here's a shot of a scrap piece that I practiced on to see if the Poplar would shade before the glue popped. I was happily surprised. it was just fine.

Artifact Wood Fashion accessory Metal Circle


So on to the shading itself. I have to say that much of the organization and segregation of the pieces really took place during the shading exercise. Here is a look at most of the parts organized (poorly at this point) in a storage tray.

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Art


Most of the shading was done in the sand tray as shown below. The temperature varies around the tray, hottest in the center so more delicate parts stay to the outside.

Food Ingredient Cookware and bakeware Cuisine Recipe


Food Ingredient Cuisine Dish Home appliance


I also shade some of the trickier and more delicate pieces with a spoon. using this method you can bring very hot sand up from the bottom of the tray and do lots of damage very quickly. You have to be careful.

I made this little video to show how I shade some of the very smallest bits. I generally don't do this at the same time as the other shading. I like to do it during assembly so I can take the piece directly from the sand and while still on the pick, touch it to the glue brush and install it. I was too busy with the video to do that here.



When all the pieces are shaded the tray looks more like this. This is now the universal tray and only has pieces that will be in all panels.

Insect Font Arthropod Pest Symmetry


Then it is put away to await assembly.

Table Dishware Wood Tableware Serveware


If you are thinking that the shading looks awfully severe in places, it does but when the surface is sanded much of that will go away and they wont look as "burned". ......... I hope ….... :)

Enough for tonight.

Thanks
for looking in.

Paul
I never knew. I thought it was all done with air brush or something.
I can now see that there is FAR more skill sets used in such work.

Thanks again for sharing. It is beautiful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #97 ·
Drawer Front Marquetry Assembly

With all the cutting and sand shading done and all the pieces properly organized, it's time to have some fun. If you've done everything right up to this point, the assembly really is fun as you get to see the marquetry image materialize before your eyes.

Before I get into that however, a couple of notes on things I've learned so far on this project.

The first is the eyesight / cutting accuracy issue that I had when started using this hard veneer. I did a little research online on the subject of magnifiers and realized that the reason my headband magnifier wasn't working for me was that the focal length was wrong for the work I was doing. Further, that the strength of the magnifier could be altered with reading glasses worn in conjunction with it. It turns out that my headgear, although not marked, is probably a 3 diopter magnifier with a focal length in the 12" area. By adding 1.25 reading glasses I get a 4.25 with a focal length of about ten inches and better magnification. More importantly, once I could see, the cuts got better.

Vertebrate Art Organism Font Pink


The second was that removing bridges, especially those that supported very small "islands" was difficult and in many cases counterproductive. The photos below show the first background I cut and the last. You can see that I used fewer bridges and smaller bridges in the second. These were much easier and quicker to remove.

Brown Rectangle Wood Art Font


Rectangle Creative arts Wood Font Art


As for the assembly itself, I used French kraft paper type mounting boards and hot hide glue, working from my two previously organized trays. It all went quite smoothly with only a few pieces needing a little filing to fit. I glued in all the parts except the flowers which I assembled dry. I'll explain why they aren't glued later.

Here's a little video of some of the assembly.



Each mounting board carries three drawer fronts. They represent the three backgrounds with the three flowers, each set has two flowers so the sets are AB,AC,BC. I will now print the pictures below, cut the individual drawer fronts apart and arrange them in the actual order that they will be installed. Here's the part about not gluing the flowers …....... when I get them arranged I will for the first time get a real look at how well the flower colors are distributed and I will be able to change any that I don't like.

I did do a color distribution exercise upon which I based the colors I used but I still want to see the real thing before I glue things down. I've included a photo of the preliminary distribution exercise.

Brown Rectangle Textile Font Wood


Rectangle Textile Wood Font Flooring


Rectangle Textile Motif Flooring Font


Rectangle Orange Pink Red Material property


That's it for now. Next up is to make final decisions on the flowers and get them glued in and then on to making some drawers for them to mount on.

Thanks for looking in.

Paul
 

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3,082 Posts
Drawer Front Marquetry Assembly

With all the cutting and sand shading done and all the pieces properly organized, it's time to have some fun. If you've done everything right up to this point, the assembly really is fun as you get to see the marquetry image materialize before your eyes.

Before I get into that however, a couple of notes on things I've learned so far on this project.

The first is the eyesight / cutting accuracy issue that I had when started using this hard veneer. I did a little research online on the subject of magnifiers and realized that the reason my headband magnifier wasn't working for me was that the focal length was wrong for the work I was doing. Further, that the strength of the magnifier could be altered with reading glasses worn in conjunction with it. It turns out that my headgear, although not marked, is probably a 3 diopter magnifier with a focal length in the 12" area. By adding 1.25 reading glasses I get a 4.25 with a focal length of about ten inches and better magnification. More importantly, once I could see, the cuts got better.

Vertebrate Art Organism Font Pink


The second was that removing bridges, especially those that supported very small "islands" was difficult and in many cases counterproductive. The photos below show the first background I cut and the last. You can see that I used fewer bridges and smaller bridges in the second. These were much easier and quicker to remove.

Brown Rectangle Wood Art Font


Rectangle Creative arts Wood Font Art


As for the assembly itself, I used French kraft paper type mounting boards and hot hide glue, working from my two previously organized trays. It all went quite smoothly with only a few pieces needing a little filing to fit. I glued in all the parts except the flowers which I assembled dry. I'll explain why they aren't glued later.

Here's a little video of some of the assembly.



Each mounting board carries three drawer fronts. They represent the three backgrounds with the three flowers, each set has two flowers so the sets are AB,AC,BC. I will now print the pictures below, cut the individual drawer fronts apart and arrange them in the actual order that they will be installed. Here's the part about not gluing the flowers …....... when I get them arranged I will for the first time get a real look at how well the flower colors are distributed and I will be able to change any that I don't like.

I did do a color distribution exercise upon which I based the colors I used but I still want to see the real thing before I glue things down. I've included a photo of the preliminary distribution exercise.

Brown Rectangle Textile Font Wood


Rectangle Textile Wood Font Flooring


Rectangle Textile Motif Flooring Font


Rectangle Orange Pink Red Material property


That's it for now. Next up is to make final decisions on the flowers and get them glued in and then on to making some drawers for them to mount on.

Thanks for looking in.

Paul
Well - that looks first class! I'm enjoying the story.
 

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Drawer Front Marquetry Assembly

With all the cutting and sand shading done and all the pieces properly organized, it's time to have some fun. If you've done everything right up to this point, the assembly really is fun as you get to see the marquetry image materialize before your eyes.

Before I get into that however, a couple of notes on things I've learned so far on this project.

The first is the eyesight / cutting accuracy issue that I had when started using this hard veneer. I did a little research online on the subject of magnifiers and realized that the reason my headband magnifier wasn't working for me was that the focal length was wrong for the work I was doing. Further, that the strength of the magnifier could be altered with reading glasses worn in conjunction with it. It turns out that my headgear, although not marked, is probably a 3 diopter magnifier with a focal length in the 12" area. By adding 1.25 reading glasses I get a 4.25 with a focal length of about ten inches and better magnification. More importantly, once I could see, the cuts got better.

Vertebrate Art Organism Font Pink


The second was that removing bridges, especially those that supported very small "islands" was difficult and in many cases counterproductive. The photos below show the first background I cut and the last. You can see that I used fewer bridges and smaller bridges in the second. These were much easier and quicker to remove.

Brown Rectangle Wood Art Font


Rectangle Creative arts Wood Font Art


As for the assembly itself, I used French kraft paper type mounting boards and hot hide glue, working from my two previously organized trays. It all went quite smoothly with only a few pieces needing a little filing to fit. I glued in all the parts except the flowers which I assembled dry. I'll explain why they aren't glued later.

Here's a little video of some of the assembly.



Each mounting board carries three drawer fronts. They represent the three backgrounds with the three flowers, each set has two flowers so the sets are AB,AC,BC. I will now print the pictures below, cut the individual drawer fronts apart and arrange them in the actual order that they will be installed. Here's the part about not gluing the flowers …....... when I get them arranged I will for the first time get a real look at how well the flower colors are distributed and I will be able to change any that I don't like.

I did do a color distribution exercise upon which I based the colors I used but I still want to see the real thing before I glue things down. I've included a photo of the preliminary distribution exercise.

Brown Rectangle Textile Font Wood


Rectangle Textile Wood Font Flooring


Rectangle Textile Motif Flooring Font


Rectangle Orange Pink Red Material property


That's it for now. Next up is to make final decisions on the flowers and get them glued in and then on to making some drawers for them to mount on.

Thanks for looking in.

Paul
Paul,

Your marquetry is really looking good!

L/W
 

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Drawer Front Marquetry Assembly

With all the cutting and sand shading done and all the pieces properly organized, it's time to have some fun. If you've done everything right up to this point, the assembly really is fun as you get to see the marquetry image materialize before your eyes.

Before I get into that however, a couple of notes on things I've learned so far on this project.

The first is the eyesight / cutting accuracy issue that I had when started using this hard veneer. I did a little research online on the subject of magnifiers and realized that the reason my headband magnifier wasn't working for me was that the focal length was wrong for the work I was doing. Further, that the strength of the magnifier could be altered with reading glasses worn in conjunction with it. It turns out that my headgear, although not marked, is probably a 3 diopter magnifier with a focal length in the 12" area. By adding 1.25 reading glasses I get a 4.25 with a focal length of about ten inches and better magnification. More importantly, once I could see, the cuts got better.

Vertebrate Art Organism Font Pink


The second was that removing bridges, especially those that supported very small "islands" was difficult and in many cases counterproductive. The photos below show the first background I cut and the last. You can see that I used fewer bridges and smaller bridges in the second. These were much easier and quicker to remove.

Brown Rectangle Wood Art Font


Rectangle Creative arts Wood Font Art


As for the assembly itself, I used French kraft paper type mounting boards and hot hide glue, working from my two previously organized trays. It all went quite smoothly with only a few pieces needing a little filing to fit. I glued in all the parts except the flowers which I assembled dry. I'll explain why they aren't glued later.

Here's a little video of some of the assembly.



Each mounting board carries three drawer fronts. They represent the three backgrounds with the three flowers, each set has two flowers so the sets are AB,AC,BC. I will now print the pictures below, cut the individual drawer fronts apart and arrange them in the actual order that they will be installed. Here's the part about not gluing the flowers …....... when I get them arranged I will for the first time get a real look at how well the flower colors are distributed and I will be able to change any that I don't like.

I did do a color distribution exercise upon which I based the colors I used but I still want to see the real thing before I glue things down. I've included a photo of the preliminary distribution exercise.

Brown Rectangle Textile Font Wood


Rectangle Textile Wood Font Flooring


Rectangle Textile Motif Flooring Font


Rectangle Orange Pink Red Material property


That's it for now. Next up is to make final decisions on the flowers and get them glued in and then on to making some drawers for them to mount on.

Thanks for looking in.

Paul
I am watching with excitement anticipating a grand finale .
Paul I just love the colours and design ,what a treat .

Klaus
 

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