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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pattern Routing Challenge

Few months ago I built an octagonal table (not my design) and did not assemble it because I was not satisfied with the legs. I also had problems with the finish.

Problem #1: The finish

The Wood used is white oak and because it's so porous I never got a flat top.
I kept builling layer of polyuratane but that did not work.

I Sanded off the finish.

I then put on 1 layer, leave it to dry, sand it down but not completely.
Put the second and the third following the same procedure.
That kind of filled the ravines but it still was not really good.

So I stripped down and applied a mixture of talk powder and poly.
That was disaster. I filled the pores allright but I ended up with a white ghost color all over.
I spent a lot of time sanding my top to clean it.

I guess I needed to treat the talk powder with something (?) to get rid of the white color.

I the learned of crystalac wood filler thanks to a review on LJ; I bought it but have not tried it yet.

Problem #2: Pattern routing the 4 legs

I use my template, trace it on the leg then scroll saw the inside (also jig saw).
I then do a pattern routing on the router table.

I got 3 legs that chattered on me I guess due to vibrations.

The first picture (without the top) shows roughly what the base should look like.



Leg picture before inside routing and after routing



Parts of broken legs



I was using :

New strait spiral bit 1/2" from whiteside
Porter Cable 3-1/4 hp router set for 19000 RPM (also tried 23000
)

I still got 3 legs chatered.

I try "small bites", upcut but that did not work.

What is the best way to patern route those legs on the inside. Although the wood is kind of thin after the scroll saw, there must be a way.

Hand sanding is tedious; I did hand sand the first one to make the template.

Comments / ideas highly needed!
 

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Pattern Routing Challenge

Few months ago I built an octagonal table (not my design) and did not assemble it because I was not satisfied with the legs. I also had problems with the finish.

Problem #1: The finish

The Wood used is white oak and because it's so porous I never got a flat top.
I kept builling layer of polyuratane but that did not work.

I Sanded off the finish.

I then put on 1 layer, leave it to dry, sand it down but not completely.
Put the second and the third following the same procedure.
That kind of filled the ravines but it still was not really good.

So I stripped down and applied a mixture of talk powder and poly.
That was disaster. I filled the pores allright but I ended up with a white ghost color all over.
I spent a lot of time sanding my top to clean it.

I guess I needed to treat the talk powder with something (?) to get rid of the white color.

I the learned of crystalac wood filler thanks to a review on LJ; I bought it but have not tried it yet.

Problem #2: Pattern routing the 4 legs

I use my template, trace it on the leg then scroll saw the inside (also jig saw).
I then do a pattern routing on the router table.

I got 3 legs that chattered on me I guess due to vibrations.

The first picture (without the top) shows roughly what the base should look like.



Leg picture before inside routing and after routing



Parts of broken legs



I was using :

New strait spiral bit 1/2" from whiteside
Porter Cable 3-1/4 hp router set for 19000 RPM (also tried 23000
)

I still got 3 legs chatered.

I try "small bites", upcut but that did not work.

What is the best way to patern route those legs on the inside. Although the wood is kind of thin after the scroll saw, there must be a way.

Hand sanding is tedious; I did hand sand the first one to make the template.

Comments / ideas highly needed!
looks good
 

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Pattern Routing Challenge

Few months ago I built an octagonal table (not my design) and did not assemble it because I was not satisfied with the legs. I also had problems with the finish.

Problem #1: The finish

The Wood used is white oak and because it's so porous I never got a flat top.
I kept builling layer of polyuratane but that did not work.

I Sanded off the finish.

I then put on 1 layer, leave it to dry, sand it down but not completely.
Put the second and the third following the same procedure.
That kind of filled the ravines but it still was not really good.

So I stripped down and applied a mixture of talk powder and poly.
That was disaster. I filled the pores allright but I ended up with a white ghost color all over.
I spent a lot of time sanding my top to clean it.

I guess I needed to treat the talk powder with something (?) to get rid of the white color.

I the learned of crystalac wood filler thanks to a review on LJ; I bought it but have not tried it yet.

Problem #2: Pattern routing the 4 legs

I use my template, trace it on the leg then scroll saw the inside (also jig saw).
I then do a pattern routing on the router table.

I got 3 legs that chattered on me I guess due to vibrations.

The first picture (without the top) shows roughly what the base should look like.



Leg picture before inside routing and after routing



Parts of broken legs



I was using :

New strait spiral bit 1/2" from whiteside
Porter Cable 3-1/4 hp router set for 19000 RPM (also tried 23000
)

I still got 3 legs chatered.

I try "small bites", upcut but that did not work.

What is the best way to patern route those legs on the inside. Although the wood is kind of thin after the scroll saw, there must be a way.

Hand sanding is tedious; I did hand sand the first one to make the template.

Comments / ideas highly needed!
I looked at this this morning and wasn't exactly sure how to answer--When you're old like me, it takes a while to get the brain in gear. So, here goes. I couldn't really think of anything you did wrong on the routing, but I did think of a possible solution. Could you do your inside routing before you do the outside shaping. This way, there is much more bulk on the legs, so maybe you do get the chatter like you did with the thinner pieces.
Of course you would have to start fresh-but maybe it is something to consider. Also, be aware of grain direction when routing. This could cause blow out and other problems

Fillings the pores--I have used a filler like you mentioned. That is a good choice. I used it on an Ash bass guitar I built. There is also paste wood filler that comes in natural and stain colors that has also worked well for me in the past. If you want more info-just ask.

Hope some of this helps

Kent
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Pattern Routing Challenge

Few months ago I built an octagonal table (not my design) and did not assemble it because I was not satisfied with the legs. I also had problems with the finish.

Problem #1: The finish

The Wood used is white oak and because it's so porous I never got a flat top.
I kept builling layer of polyuratane but that did not work.

I Sanded off the finish.

I then put on 1 layer, leave it to dry, sand it down but not completely.
Put the second and the third following the same procedure.
That kind of filled the ravines but it still was not really good.

So I stripped down and applied a mixture of talk powder and poly.
That was disaster. I filled the pores allright but I ended up with a white ghost color all over.
I spent a lot of time sanding my top to clean it.

I guess I needed to treat the talk powder with something (?) to get rid of the white color.

I the learned of crystalac wood filler thanks to a review on LJ; I bought it but have not tried it yet.

Problem #2: Pattern routing the 4 legs

I use my template, trace it on the leg then scroll saw the inside (also jig saw).
I then do a pattern routing on the router table.

I got 3 legs that chattered on me I guess due to vibrations.

The first picture (without the top) shows roughly what the base should look like.



Leg picture before inside routing and after routing



Parts of broken legs



I was using :

New strait spiral bit 1/2" from whiteside
Porter Cable 3-1/4 hp router set for 19000 RPM (also tried 23000
)

I still got 3 legs chatered.

I try "small bites", upcut but that did not work.

What is the best way to patern route those legs on the inside. Although the wood is kind of thin after the scroll saw, there must be a way.

Hand sanding is tedious; I did hand sand the first one to make the template.

Comments / ideas highly needed!
Thanks Dub560.

Kent thanks for the suggestion. I can certainly route the inside then the outside.
I think I have to bandsaw the outside shape closer the final shape, like 1/32 then do outside template routing. That way I am taking away very litle material.

I am probably going to have the same thickness after the bandsaw and before the routing but it is certainly worth a try.

One thing I did pay attention too much to is grain direction changes. I think you are right; I will mark the grain changes with the pencil and change routing direction as the grain changes.

I am certainly going to try that
 

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Pattern Routing Challenge

Few months ago I built an octagonal table (not my design) and did not assemble it because I was not satisfied with the legs. I also had problems with the finish.

Problem #1: The finish

The Wood used is white oak and because it's so porous I never got a flat top.
I kept builling layer of polyuratane but that did not work.

I Sanded off the finish.

I then put on 1 layer, leave it to dry, sand it down but not completely.
Put the second and the third following the same procedure.
That kind of filled the ravines but it still was not really good.

So I stripped down and applied a mixture of talk powder and poly.
That was disaster. I filled the pores allright but I ended up with a white ghost color all over.
I spent a lot of time sanding my top to clean it.

I guess I needed to treat the talk powder with something (?) to get rid of the white color.

I the learned of crystalac wood filler thanks to a review on LJ; I bought it but have not tried it yet.

Problem #2: Pattern routing the 4 legs

I use my template, trace it on the leg then scroll saw the inside (also jig saw).
I then do a pattern routing on the router table.

I got 3 legs that chattered on me I guess due to vibrations.

The first picture (without the top) shows roughly what the base should look like.



Leg picture before inside routing and after routing



Parts of broken legs



I was using :

New strait spiral bit 1/2" from whiteside
Porter Cable 3-1/4 hp router set for 19000 RPM (also tried 23000
)

I still got 3 legs chatered.

I try "small bites", upcut but that did not work.

What is the best way to patern route those legs on the inside. Although the wood is kind of thin after the scroll saw, there must be a way.

Hand sanding is tedious; I did hand sand the first one to make the template.

Comments / ideas highly needed!
You are on the right track. I make hand mirrors with a template and the less I have to take off with the pattern bit the better. 1/32 is a good target especially at the point where you are routing end grain. On outside curves I even use a sanding station to get "very" close to the final profile without messing up my template. Oak tends to "grab" because of the open grain, but as you know all woods have their strengths, weaknesses and cost.

Good Luck…and by the way if you are a beginner you really shouldn't take pictures of other peoples projects and post them as your own….kidding obviously, what I see in that top photo was not made by a "beginner", time to give yourself some credit…:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Pattern Routing Challenge

Few months ago I built an octagonal table (not my design) and did not assemble it because I was not satisfied with the legs. I also had problems with the finish.

Problem #1: The finish

The Wood used is white oak and because it's so porous I never got a flat top.
I kept builling layer of polyuratane but that did not work.

I Sanded off the finish.

I then put on 1 layer, leave it to dry, sand it down but not completely.
Put the second and the third following the same procedure.
That kind of filled the ravines but it still was not really good.

So I stripped down and applied a mixture of talk powder and poly.
That was disaster. I filled the pores allright but I ended up with a white ghost color all over.
I spent a lot of time sanding my top to clean it.

I guess I needed to treat the talk powder with something (?) to get rid of the white color.

I the learned of crystalac wood filler thanks to a review on LJ; I bought it but have not tried it yet.

Problem #2: Pattern routing the 4 legs

I use my template, trace it on the leg then scroll saw the inside (also jig saw).
I then do a pattern routing on the router table.

I got 3 legs that chattered on me I guess due to vibrations.

The first picture (without the top) shows roughly what the base should look like.



Leg picture before inside routing and after routing



Parts of broken legs



I was using :

New strait spiral bit 1/2" from whiteside
Porter Cable 3-1/4 hp router set for 19000 RPM (also tried 23000
)

I still got 3 legs chatered.

I try "small bites", upcut but that did not work.

What is the best way to patern route those legs on the inside. Although the wood is kind of thin after the scroll saw, there must be a way.

Hand sanding is tedious; I did hand sand the first one to make the template.

Comments / ideas highly needed!
Retseih, Thanks for the input.

I fully agree, oak "grab" quite a bit. I think my biggest problem is to learn to slow down when needed and do it right. I tend to rush projects and mess them up.
I must say that I have not tried your idea of sanding a little between the bandsaw and the flush bit.

I will try that. I think between Ken's input and yours I should be able to get those legs done.

There are a lot of talented people on this site. Their work reflect a lot of accumulated experience, talent and patience. I am still a small pupy. I will need many many years to get there.

I will post progress.
Thanks for your input much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Some progress

I made some progress on routing the legs for my octagonal table that I blogged about last time.
Some of you remember that the oak was "grabing" on the router bit and the leg would shatter.
http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18200

From the advise I got, I set the following goal in my last blog:
-Scroll saw /jigsaw very close to the cut line
-Sand some
-Pay attention to grain direction changes
-Pattern route the leg

Well I stuck close to the above outline and the wood did not shatter.

I still have few small "nics" that will go with sanding and 1 bigger one that will require some thinking or maybe filling.

I started on the scrollsaw and after 3 blades I cut out the inside. I obviously could not use the bandsaw because of the enclosed areas. I lost 3 blades partly because the thickness and hardness of the Oak, my inexperience with scrollsaws and also the wrong type of blades. The blades I have on hand were rated up to 1/2 inch; I am using 4/4 oak for this project.

Some of you will see that I deviated a little with the scrollsaw and created a small problem area.



I sanded some area where I was not close to the routing line as I wanted to take very little material with the router.



I then headed to the router table. I decided to use a bushing for 2 reasons:
-the templale I have (made by a friend with a CNC router) was wider than I wanted.
-I wanted my piece to be on the top so I can see grain direction changes.

With the bushing, instead a flush top bearing bit, I achieved those 2 goals



The reasult was pretty good.



Now time to cut out the outside of the leg on the bandsaw and some more flush pattern routing (top bearing bit this time):





The final result turned out pretty good. I got some damages as you see in the picture below. the call for dinner resonate through the house and I had to finish so I miss the grain direction change. I also chamfered the edges.
Wood filler maybe, epoxy with saw dust, open to ideas…



The two small circled area, I think I can sand; they are not deep.
The bigger area need some serious thinking.

Advise and criticism are welcome as always, that how I learn. Any thoughts please do not hesitate.
I never blocked anyone and never will.

Thanks for looking.
 

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Some progress

I made some progress on routing the legs for my octagonal table that I blogged about last time.
Some of you remember that the oak was "grabing" on the router bit and the leg would shatter.
http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18200

From the advise I got, I set the following goal in my last blog:
-Scroll saw /jigsaw very close to the cut line
-Sand some
-Pay attention to grain direction changes
-Pattern route the leg

Well I stuck close to the above outline and the wood did not shatter.

I still have few small "nics" that will go with sanding and 1 bigger one that will require some thinking or maybe filling.

I started on the scrollsaw and after 3 blades I cut out the inside. I obviously could not use the bandsaw because of the enclosed areas. I lost 3 blades partly because the thickness and hardness of the Oak, my inexperience with scrollsaws and also the wrong type of blades. The blades I have on hand were rated up to 1/2 inch; I am using 4/4 oak for this project.

Some of you will see that I deviated a little with the scrollsaw and created a small problem area.



I sanded some area where I was not close to the routing line as I wanted to take very little material with the router.



I then headed to the router table. I decided to use a bushing for 2 reasons:
-the templale I have (made by a friend with a CNC router) was wider than I wanted.
-I wanted my piece to be on the top so I can see grain direction changes.

With the bushing, instead a flush top bearing bit, I achieved those 2 goals



The reasult was pretty good.



Now time to cut out the outside of the leg on the bandsaw and some more flush pattern routing (top bearing bit this time):





The final result turned out pretty good. I got some damages as you see in the picture below. the call for dinner resonate through the house and I had to finish so I miss the grain direction change. I also chamfered the edges.
Wood filler maybe, epoxy with saw dust, open to ideas…



The two small circled area, I think I can sand; they are not deep.
The bigger area need some serious thinking.

Advise and criticism are welcome as always, that how I learn. Any thoughts please do not hesitate.
I never blocked anyone and never will.

Thanks for looking.
this wood be very difficult to fix with out seeing the fix. what if you fix them all the same way ( run a contrasting strip of wood on the outside of all legs.) or maybe it may just require starting over?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Some progress

I made some progress on routing the legs for my octagonal table that I blogged about last time.
Some of you remember that the oak was "grabing" on the router bit and the leg would shatter.
http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18200

From the advise I got, I set the following goal in my last blog:
-Scroll saw /jigsaw very close to the cut line
-Sand some
-Pay attention to grain direction changes
-Pattern route the leg

Well I stuck close to the above outline and the wood did not shatter.

I still have few small "nics" that will go with sanding and 1 bigger one that will require some thinking or maybe filling.

I started on the scrollsaw and after 3 blades I cut out the inside. I obviously could not use the bandsaw because of the enclosed areas. I lost 3 blades partly because the thickness and hardness of the Oak, my inexperience with scrollsaws and also the wrong type of blades. The blades I have on hand were rated up to 1/2 inch; I am using 4/4 oak for this project.

Some of you will see that I deviated a little with the scrollsaw and created a small problem area.



I sanded some area where I was not close to the routing line as I wanted to take very little material with the router.



I then headed to the router table. I decided to use a bushing for 2 reasons:
-the templale I have (made by a friend with a CNC router) was wider than I wanted.
-I wanted my piece to be on the top so I can see grain direction changes.

With the bushing, instead a flush top bearing bit, I achieved those 2 goals



The reasult was pretty good.



Now time to cut out the outside of the leg on the bandsaw and some more flush pattern routing (top bearing bit this time):





The final result turned out pretty good. I got some damages as you see in the picture below. the call for dinner resonate through the house and I had to finish so I miss the grain direction change. I also chamfered the edges.
Wood filler maybe, epoxy with saw dust, open to ideas…



The two small circled area, I think I can sand; they are not deep.
The bigger area need some serious thinking.

Advise and criticism are welcome as always, that how I learn. Any thoughts please do not hesitate.
I never blocked anyone and never will.

Thanks for looking.
Partridge:
That has cross my mind. I contemplated cutting a 1/16 deep inlay accross the width and use sapele or nahogany but got actually aprehensive given the thickness of that segment.
I am not very good at that yet. I would have to try on a scrap with the same thikness and see how it comes out.

Starting over is a possibility but I am most likely going to run into similar things.

Do you think Mixing some epoxy and oak powder from the same wood, aplying the paste and sanding it would work?

Thanks for your input, much appreciated.
 

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Some progress

I made some progress on routing the legs for my octagonal table that I blogged about last time.
Some of you remember that the oak was "grabing" on the router bit and the leg would shatter.
http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18200

From the advise I got, I set the following goal in my last blog:
-Scroll saw /jigsaw very close to the cut line
-Sand some
-Pay attention to grain direction changes
-Pattern route the leg

Well I stuck close to the above outline and the wood did not shatter.

I still have few small "nics" that will go with sanding and 1 bigger one that will require some thinking or maybe filling.

I started on the scrollsaw and after 3 blades I cut out the inside. I obviously could not use the bandsaw because of the enclosed areas. I lost 3 blades partly because the thickness and hardness of the Oak, my inexperience with scrollsaws and also the wrong type of blades. The blades I have on hand were rated up to 1/2 inch; I am using 4/4 oak for this project.

Some of you will see that I deviated a little with the scrollsaw and created a small problem area.



I sanded some area where I was not close to the routing line as I wanted to take very little material with the router.



I then headed to the router table. I decided to use a bushing for 2 reasons:
-the templale I have (made by a friend with a CNC router) was wider than I wanted.
-I wanted my piece to be on the top so I can see grain direction changes.

With the bushing, instead a flush top bearing bit, I achieved those 2 goals



The reasult was pretty good.



Now time to cut out the outside of the leg on the bandsaw and some more flush pattern routing (top bearing bit this time):





The final result turned out pretty good. I got some damages as you see in the picture below. the call for dinner resonate through the house and I had to finish so I miss the grain direction change. I also chamfered the edges.
Wood filler maybe, epoxy with saw dust, open to ideas…



The two small circled area, I think I can sand; they are not deep.
The bigger area need some serious thinking.

Advise and criticism are welcome as always, that how I learn. Any thoughts please do not hesitate.
I never blocked anyone and never will.

Thanks for looking.
I would try to cut away the damaged area and glue in a piece of matching wood. Then reshape. Take some time to get a tight fit and try to make the glue line as faint as possible. Here is a post where I share some of my efforts to do the same…
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Some progress

I made some progress on routing the legs for my octagonal table that I blogged about last time.
Some of you remember that the oak was "grabing" on the router bit and the leg would shatter.
http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18200

From the advise I got, I set the following goal in my last blog:
-Scroll saw /jigsaw very close to the cut line
-Sand some
-Pay attention to grain direction changes
-Pattern route the leg

Well I stuck close to the above outline and the wood did not shatter.

I still have few small "nics" that will go with sanding and 1 bigger one that will require some thinking or maybe filling.

I started on the scrollsaw and after 3 blades I cut out the inside. I obviously could not use the bandsaw because of the enclosed areas. I lost 3 blades partly because the thickness and hardness of the Oak, my inexperience with scrollsaws and also the wrong type of blades. The blades I have on hand were rated up to 1/2 inch; I am using 4/4 oak for this project.

Some of you will see that I deviated a little with the scrollsaw and created a small problem area.



I sanded some area where I was not close to the routing line as I wanted to take very little material with the router.



I then headed to the router table. I decided to use a bushing for 2 reasons:
-the templale I have (made by a friend with a CNC router) was wider than I wanted.
-I wanted my piece to be on the top so I can see grain direction changes.

With the bushing, instead a flush top bearing bit, I achieved those 2 goals



The reasult was pretty good.



Now time to cut out the outside of the leg on the bandsaw and some more flush pattern routing (top bearing bit this time):





The final result turned out pretty good. I got some damages as you see in the picture below. the call for dinner resonate through the house and I had to finish so I miss the grain direction change. I also chamfered the edges.
Wood filler maybe, epoxy with saw dust, open to ideas…



The two small circled area, I think I can sand; they are not deep.
The bigger area need some serious thinking.

Advise and criticism are welcome as always, that how I learn. Any thoughts please do not hesitate.
I never blocked anyone and never will.

Thanks for looking.
Thanks Steve. I am affraid it will come to that. I don't see anyone liking the epoxy idea.

Great blog you wrote there. Good information for fixes.
Impatience has indeed been very expensive for me in time and wood waisted.
 

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Some progress

I made some progress on routing the legs for my octagonal table that I blogged about last time.
Some of you remember that the oak was "grabing" on the router bit and the leg would shatter.
http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18200

From the advise I got, I set the following goal in my last blog:
-Scroll saw /jigsaw very close to the cut line
-Sand some
-Pay attention to grain direction changes
-Pattern route the leg

Well I stuck close to the above outline and the wood did not shatter.

I still have few small "nics" that will go with sanding and 1 bigger one that will require some thinking or maybe filling.

I started on the scrollsaw and after 3 blades I cut out the inside. I obviously could not use the bandsaw because of the enclosed areas. I lost 3 blades partly because the thickness and hardness of the Oak, my inexperience with scrollsaws and also the wrong type of blades. The blades I have on hand were rated up to 1/2 inch; I am using 4/4 oak for this project.

Some of you will see that I deviated a little with the scrollsaw and created a small problem area.



I sanded some area where I was not close to the routing line as I wanted to take very little material with the router.



I then headed to the router table. I decided to use a bushing for 2 reasons:
-the templale I have (made by a friend with a CNC router) was wider than I wanted.
-I wanted my piece to be on the top so I can see grain direction changes.

With the bushing, instead a flush top bearing bit, I achieved those 2 goals



The reasult was pretty good.



Now time to cut out the outside of the leg on the bandsaw and some more flush pattern routing (top bearing bit this time):





The final result turned out pretty good. I got some damages as you see in the picture below. the call for dinner resonate through the house and I had to finish so I miss the grain direction change. I also chamfered the edges.
Wood filler maybe, epoxy with saw dust, open to ideas…



The two small circled area, I think I can sand; they are not deep.
The bigger area need some serious thinking.

Advise and criticism are welcome as always, that how I learn. Any thoughts please do not hesitate.
I never blocked anyone and never will.

Thanks for looking.
Ian, I agree with Steve on this, and I acually like these fixes, it brings some personality.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

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Some progress

I made some progress on routing the legs for my octagonal table that I blogged about last time.
Some of you remember that the oak was "grabing" on the router bit and the leg would shatter.
http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18200

From the advise I got, I set the following goal in my last blog:
-Scroll saw /jigsaw very close to the cut line
-Sand some
-Pay attention to grain direction changes
-Pattern route the leg

Well I stuck close to the above outline and the wood did not shatter.

I still have few small "nics" that will go with sanding and 1 bigger one that will require some thinking or maybe filling.

I started on the scrollsaw and after 3 blades I cut out the inside. I obviously could not use the bandsaw because of the enclosed areas. I lost 3 blades partly because the thickness and hardness of the Oak, my inexperience with scrollsaws and also the wrong type of blades. The blades I have on hand were rated up to 1/2 inch; I am using 4/4 oak for this project.

Some of you will see that I deviated a little with the scrollsaw and created a small problem area.



I sanded some area where I was not close to the routing line as I wanted to take very little material with the router.



I then headed to the router table. I decided to use a bushing for 2 reasons:
-the templale I have (made by a friend with a CNC router) was wider than I wanted.
-I wanted my piece to be on the top so I can see grain direction changes.

With the bushing, instead a flush top bearing bit, I achieved those 2 goals



The reasult was pretty good.



Now time to cut out the outside of the leg on the bandsaw and some more flush pattern routing (top bearing bit this time):





The final result turned out pretty good. I got some damages as you see in the picture below. the call for dinner resonate through the house and I had to finish so I miss the grain direction change. I also chamfered the edges.
Wood filler maybe, epoxy with saw dust, open to ideas…



The two small circled area, I think I can sand; they are not deep.
The bigger area need some serious thinking.

Advise and criticism are welcome as always, that how I learn. Any thoughts please do not hesitate.
I never blocked anyone and never will.

Thanks for looking.
Do it over and do it right. It's only a piece of wood so far.
You want it to be furniture and your name will be on it.

Lessons learned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Some progress

I made some progress on routing the legs for my octagonal table that I blogged about last time.
Some of you remember that the oak was "grabing" on the router bit and the leg would shatter.
http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18200

From the advise I got, I set the following goal in my last blog:
-Scroll saw /jigsaw very close to the cut line
-Sand some
-Pay attention to grain direction changes
-Pattern route the leg

Well I stuck close to the above outline and the wood did not shatter.

I still have few small "nics" that will go with sanding and 1 bigger one that will require some thinking or maybe filling.

I started on the scrollsaw and after 3 blades I cut out the inside. I obviously could not use the bandsaw because of the enclosed areas. I lost 3 blades partly because the thickness and hardness of the Oak, my inexperience with scrollsaws and also the wrong type of blades. The blades I have on hand were rated up to 1/2 inch; I am using 4/4 oak for this project.

Some of you will see that I deviated a little with the scrollsaw and created a small problem area.



I sanded some area where I was not close to the routing line as I wanted to take very little material with the router.



I then headed to the router table. I decided to use a bushing for 2 reasons:
-the templale I have (made by a friend with a CNC router) was wider than I wanted.
-I wanted my piece to be on the top so I can see grain direction changes.

With the bushing, instead a flush top bearing bit, I achieved those 2 goals



The reasult was pretty good.



Now time to cut out the outside of the leg on the bandsaw and some more flush pattern routing (top bearing bit this time):





The final result turned out pretty good. I got some damages as you see in the picture below. the call for dinner resonate through the house and I had to finish so I miss the grain direction change. I also chamfered the edges.
Wood filler maybe, epoxy with saw dust, open to ideas…



The two small circled area, I think I can sand; they are not deep.
The bigger area need some serious thinking.

Advise and criticism are welcome as always, that how I learn. Any thoughts please do not hesitate.
I never blocked anyone and never will.

Thanks for looking.
Mafe, Bob#2, Thanks for the comments.

It looks like that if I miss any "fix" I may attempt, I would have to redo the piece.
Since I have nothing to loose at this point, I think I will try the easiest route first: I will try too "patch it". That way I practice patching/fixing. If that fails, I will spend another weekend re-cuting and routing. I still have 2 more legs to go anyway.

Thank you all for the ideas!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Success

The octagonal table project is making some progress! I have now successfully routed the leg(not totally satisfied).

I was encountering some problems during the pattern routing of the legs as I described in my last 2 blogs: http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18200 and http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18452

Some of you have seen the problems I was having and gave advise that were very valuable.
Another valuable resource could be found here:
http://americanwoodworker.com/blogs/tips/archive/2009/10/20/9-tips-for-beating-router-tear-out.aspx

I have attempted to fix some of the tear out I had with a mixture of solutions.

the first solution attempted on one of the legs was to use epoxy and saw dust (from the same wood) the result was pretty good but I did not get the same color. The white Oak got more brown for reason unclear to me yet. Cutting out that small portion of the leg and glueing an equal piece was not successfull. That leg was redone.


On the second leg were the bottom part of it was badly teared, I attempted to cut that portion and re-glue another one, then reroute it. It came out "so-so" so I redid it as well.





The third leg got a crack and a chip out as seen in the picture below. This one I was able to glue it and fill some.



The final result is 4 leg that I can use. I still need to cut 2 rabbets at the top and sand.



I now move to refinishing the table top: That's another challange.
 

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13,957 Posts
Success

The octagonal table project is making some progress! I have now successfully routed the leg(not totally satisfied).

I was encountering some problems during the pattern routing of the legs as I described in my last 2 blogs: http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18200 and http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18452

Some of you have seen the problems I was having and gave advise that were very valuable.
Another valuable resource could be found here:
http://americanwoodworker.com/blogs/tips/archive/2009/10/20/9-tips-for-beating-router-tear-out.aspx

I have attempted to fix some of the tear out I had with a mixture of solutions.

the first solution attempted on one of the legs was to use epoxy and saw dust (from the same wood) the result was pretty good but I did not get the same color. The white Oak got more brown for reason unclear to me yet. Cutting out that small portion of the leg and glueing an equal piece was not successfull. That leg was redone.


On the second leg were the bottom part of it was badly teared, I attempted to cut that portion and re-glue another one, then reroute it. It came out "so-so" so I redid it as well.





The third leg got a crack and a chip out as seen in the picture below. This one I was able to glue it and fill some.



The final result is 4 leg that I can use. I still need to cut 2 rabbets at the top and sand.



I now move to refinishing the table top: That's another challange.
Hi Ian,
Thank you for the tips, I know nothing about routing so this was very recoursefull to me.
Now I really have to work on my router table.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

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Success

The octagonal table project is making some progress! I have now successfully routed the leg(not totally satisfied).

I was encountering some problems during the pattern routing of the legs as I described in my last 2 blogs: http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18200 and http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18452

Some of you have seen the problems I was having and gave advise that were very valuable.
Another valuable resource could be found here:
http://americanwoodworker.com/blogs/tips/archive/2009/10/20/9-tips-for-beating-router-tear-out.aspx

I have attempted to fix some of the tear out I had with a mixture of solutions.

the first solution attempted on one of the legs was to use epoxy and saw dust (from the same wood) the result was pretty good but I did not get the same color. The white Oak got more brown for reason unclear to me yet. Cutting out that small portion of the leg and glueing an equal piece was not successfull. That leg was redone.


On the second leg were the bottom part of it was badly teared, I attempted to cut that portion and re-glue another one, then reroute it. It came out "so-so" so I redid it as well.





The third leg got a crack and a chip out as seen in the picture below. This one I was able to glue it and fill some.



The final result is 4 leg that I can use. I still need to cut 2 rabbets at the top and sand.



I now move to refinishing the table top: That's another challange.
Looks like you're getting the hanghose of it, guy. Those are some wild looking legs. I can't wait to see the finished product.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Success

The octagonal table project is making some progress! I have now successfully routed the leg(not totally satisfied).

I was encountering some problems during the pattern routing of the legs as I described in my last 2 blogs: http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18200 and http://lumberjocks.com/lanwater/blog/18452

Some of you have seen the problems I was having and gave advise that were very valuable.
Another valuable resource could be found here:
http://americanwoodworker.com/blogs/tips/archive/2009/10/20/9-tips-for-beating-router-tear-out.aspx

I have attempted to fix some of the tear out I had with a mixture of solutions.

the first solution attempted on one of the legs was to use epoxy and saw dust (from the same wood) the result was pretty good but I did not get the same color. The white Oak got more brown for reason unclear to me yet. Cutting out that small portion of the leg and glueing an equal piece was not successfull. That leg was redone.


On the second leg were the bottom part of it was badly teared, I attempted to cut that portion and re-glue another one, then reroute it. It came out "so-so" so I redid it as well.





The third leg got a crack and a chip out as seen in the picture below. This one I was able to glue it and fill some.



The final result is 4 leg that I can use. I still need to cut 2 rabbets at the top and sand.



I now move to refinishing the table top: That's another challange.
Mafe: The one tip that I got when I started routing and the most important: Keep your fingers out of the way. I believe you are being modest. Your work reflect many talents.

BigTiny: My wife says that with the time I spent on it I could have bought many tables. I am hoping that by the time I am done it does not turned into a disaster.
 
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