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Someday I would like to do woodworking full time, I am trying to get into a niche woodworking business, I dont wont to build kitchen cabinets full time it to much of a hasel for me. I wont to do something that the rest of pack is not doing. I dont know where to start, I am thinking beds, tables, chairs, millwork or something on those lines.
 

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Build them all and then build your own creations.. then follow the ones that inspire you and make you want to wake up and build more of them.
 

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I build decks using tropical hardwood, and I build them as if they were furniture. Some people say "it's just a deck", but not my clients. It's easy to outbuild my competition, and I've been successful for many years. I still get to play with my tools, and make sawdust…and be my own boss.
I also make built-in bookcases (cold weather and rainy day projects), and do very well with that part of the business too.
It took me years before I decided to concentrate on one or 2 specialties. Years of being a trim carpenter and a cabinetmaker…I even built 2 houses.
Whatever you choose to do, do the best that you can, and try to be original. If you have great skills, and a good market, you'll succeed.
 

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Im with you bud. I am a maintenance manager, which is what i wanted for a long time. But woodworking has my heart and soul. I wonder if i did woodworking full time would i loose sight of the glory it holds? Think about that. I enjoy cabinet making myself and would love to contract cabinet making from local retailers. I wonder how to get in to the market. You have to ask how to get your goods in front of the people who will buy them.
 

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Being a demolition contractor and a wood working hobbyist .. i would say a niche market could be reclaimed furniture. It certainly takes its toll on your time and tools working with old used wood, but IMHO the character and the story behind the wood is invaluable. Whenever i finish a reclaimed piece i always burn where the lumber came from into the piece. I certainly cant say wheter or not there is a market out there for reclaimed furniture but just throwin out my thoughts.
 

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I have no desire to make a living at woodworking since I already have made my living and I enjoy a nice pension. However, I have done quite a bit of woodworking for my church and one other church. The furniture available from the catalogues is quite expensive and you can custom build and be price competitive. Also, churches like things custom designed and often built in. At the moment I am working on a project to upgrade the looks of the church pews by making new panels for the ends of the pews.

It may take a lot of effort to get your name known, but if you build your reputation you could become the one to go to for custom church work.
 

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I was watching a TV story a couple of years ago and they had a woodworker on there that used to build furniture and was quite good at it. He had, I believe, a neighbor ask him if he could build a casket for her husband who either had just died, or was expected to. She wanted a simple pine box like you see in the cowboy movies. He built here one and the word got out, and now he no longer does furniture, but devotes full time to casket making….how about that for a niche? :)
 

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Do what there is to do that you have the equipment for. I have done that and now have too many requests to keep up with. I discovered along the way that I like doing the special request projects that people want. I have done a lot of children's toys intended to be air looms. Also martin houses, mantles, furniture and what ever comes up. It is always interesting and a nice additional income.
 

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Be aware of the legal ramifications of this venture. Business licenses, zoning regulations, tax certificates for collecting sales tax, liability insurance, OSHA (and the state equivalent agency) to name a few. I would take time to visit a lawyer and see what this venture requires. Good luck! Hope it works out for you.
 
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