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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Getting Started

Having retired some 18 months ago, I've been picking up some woodworking skills and tools and it's obvious that you can never have enough of either, but particularly of the skills. I've got a 11×24 shop that has served me fairly well until I bought a hybrid table saw. Now, to do anything I drag one tool out of the way and drag the next one into place. It's boring work that I've put up with till a friend said 'Why don't you build a bigger shop?' I wasn't about to do that, but as time wore on the idea became more appealing until finally, I'll do it. So I went back to work to pay for it and hired a contractor friend, who wanted the work, to build it.

The plan was to start in the spring as soon as things dry out, usually in May or June. We'll here's a picture of one of many snowstorms we got through May into June.



That's not entirely unexpected for May but when the snow finally stopped in June we started getting severe hailstorms that caused lots of damage and kept everything soaked.

And another that occurred the last week of June:


We'll the storms have finally stopped and some of the trees are finally starting to bud out (yes July 7). We started excavation. Here's pictures of the location and footing trenches.

!



The new shop will be 24' x 24' with in floor heat. A couple windows and a door for cooling. I'll keep the old room for mechanicals like a compressor, dust control, and the boiler (hot water heater). I'm planning to put an electric subpanel in the new shop with plenty of 110 and 220 circuits.

That's all for now. I'll try to keep this blog going as things progress
 

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2,854 Posts
Getting Started

Having retired some 18 months ago, I've been picking up some woodworking skills and tools and it's obvious that you can never have enough of either, but particularly of the skills. I've got a 11×24 shop that has served me fairly well until I bought a hybrid table saw. Now, to do anything I drag one tool out of the way and drag the next one into place. It's boring work that I've put up with till a friend said 'Why don't you build a bigger shop?' I wasn't about to do that, but as time wore on the idea became more appealing until finally, I'll do it. So I went back to work to pay for it and hired a contractor friend, who wanted the work, to build it.

The plan was to start in the spring as soon as things dry out, usually in May or June. We'll here's a picture of one of many snowstorms we got through May into June.



That's not entirely unexpected for May but when the snow finally stopped in June we started getting severe hailstorms that caused lots of damage and kept everything soaked.

And another that occurred the last week of June:


We'll the storms have finally stopped and some of the trees are finally starting to bud out (yes July 7). We started excavation. Here's pictures of the location and footing trenches.

!



The new shop will be 24' x 24' with in floor heat. A couple windows and a door for cooling. I'll keep the old room for mechanicals like a compressor, dust control, and the boiler (hot water heater). I'm planning to put an electric subpanel in the new shop with plenty of 110 and 220 circuits.

That's all for now. I'll try to keep this blog going as things progress
Awesome !!!! We love shops and shops being biult is even better. Thanks for sharing and keep the pictures coming.
 

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Getting Started

Having retired some 18 months ago, I've been picking up some woodworking skills and tools and it's obvious that you can never have enough of either, but particularly of the skills. I've got a 11×24 shop that has served me fairly well until I bought a hybrid table saw. Now, to do anything I drag one tool out of the way and drag the next one into place. It's boring work that I've put up with till a friend said 'Why don't you build a bigger shop?' I wasn't about to do that, but as time wore on the idea became more appealing until finally, I'll do it. So I went back to work to pay for it and hired a contractor friend, who wanted the work, to build it.

The plan was to start in the spring as soon as things dry out, usually in May or June. We'll here's a picture of one of many snowstorms we got through May into June.



That's not entirely unexpected for May but when the snow finally stopped in June we started getting severe hailstorms that caused lots of damage and kept everything soaked.

And another that occurred the last week of June:


We'll the storms have finally stopped and some of the trees are finally starting to bud out (yes July 7). We started excavation. Here's pictures of the location and footing trenches.

!



The new shop will be 24' x 24' with in floor heat. A couple windows and a door for cooling. I'll keep the old room for mechanicals like a compressor, dust control, and the boiler (hot water heater). I'm planning to put an electric subpanel in the new shop with plenty of 110 and 220 circuits.

That's all for now. I'll try to keep this blog going as things progress
Hey Joe
This should be a great place for a shop.
One more thing , Can I live in your back yard?
 

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Getting Started

Having retired some 18 months ago, I've been picking up some woodworking skills and tools and it's obvious that you can never have enough of either, but particularly of the skills. I've got a 11×24 shop that has served me fairly well until I bought a hybrid table saw. Now, to do anything I drag one tool out of the way and drag the next one into place. It's boring work that I've put up with till a friend said 'Why don't you build a bigger shop?' I wasn't about to do that, but as time wore on the idea became more appealing until finally, I'll do it. So I went back to work to pay for it and hired a contractor friend, who wanted the work, to build it.

The plan was to start in the spring as soon as things dry out, usually in May or June. We'll here's a picture of one of many snowstorms we got through May into June.



That's not entirely unexpected for May but when the snow finally stopped in June we started getting severe hailstorms that caused lots of damage and kept everything soaked.

And another that occurred the last week of June:


We'll the storms have finally stopped and some of the trees are finally starting to bud out (yes July 7). We started excavation. Here's pictures of the location and footing trenches.

!



The new shop will be 24' x 24' with in floor heat. A couple windows and a door for cooling. I'll keep the old room for mechanicals like a compressor, dust control, and the boiler (hot water heater). I'm planning to put an electric subpanel in the new shop with plenty of 110 and 220 circuits.

That's all for now. I'll try to keep this blog going as things progress
Very cool… Look fwd to watching the progress. Congrats!
 

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7,426 Posts
Getting Started

Having retired some 18 months ago, I've been picking up some woodworking skills and tools and it's obvious that you can never have enough of either, but particularly of the skills. I've got a 11×24 shop that has served me fairly well until I bought a hybrid table saw. Now, to do anything I drag one tool out of the way and drag the next one into place. It's boring work that I've put up with till a friend said 'Why don't you build a bigger shop?' I wasn't about to do that, but as time wore on the idea became more appealing until finally, I'll do it. So I went back to work to pay for it and hired a contractor friend, who wanted the work, to build it.

The plan was to start in the spring as soon as things dry out, usually in May or June. We'll here's a picture of one of many snowstorms we got through May into June.



That's not entirely unexpected for May but when the snow finally stopped in June we started getting severe hailstorms that caused lots of damage and kept everything soaked.

And another that occurred the last week of June:


We'll the storms have finally stopped and some of the trees are finally starting to bud out (yes July 7). We started excavation. Here's pictures of the location and footing trenches.

!



The new shop will be 24' x 24' with in floor heat. A couple windows and a door for cooling. I'll keep the old room for mechanicals like a compressor, dust control, and the boiler (hot water heater). I'm planning to put an electric subpanel in the new shop with plenty of 110 and 220 circuits.

That's all for now. I'll try to keep this blog going as things progress
8 metres square.. very nice. wide is good long is good… all is good.
 

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Getting Started

Having retired some 18 months ago, I've been picking up some woodworking skills and tools and it's obvious that you can never have enough of either, but particularly of the skills. I've got a 11×24 shop that has served me fairly well until I bought a hybrid table saw. Now, to do anything I drag one tool out of the way and drag the next one into place. It's boring work that I've put up with till a friend said 'Why don't you build a bigger shop?' I wasn't about to do that, but as time wore on the idea became more appealing until finally, I'll do it. So I went back to work to pay for it and hired a contractor friend, who wanted the work, to build it.

The plan was to start in the spring as soon as things dry out, usually in May or June. We'll here's a picture of one of many snowstorms we got through May into June.



That's not entirely unexpected for May but when the snow finally stopped in June we started getting severe hailstorms that caused lots of damage and kept everything soaked.

And another that occurred the last week of June:


We'll the storms have finally stopped and some of the trees are finally starting to bud out (yes July 7). We started excavation. Here's pictures of the location and footing trenches.

!



The new shop will be 24' x 24' with in floor heat. A couple windows and a door for cooling. I'll keep the old room for mechanicals like a compressor, dust control, and the boiler (hot water heater). I'm planning to put an electric subpanel in the new shop with plenty of 110 and 220 circuits.

That's all for now. I'll try to keep this blog going as things progress
Sure is pretty up there. Too bad LOML is such a southern lady… She hates the cold…
 

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Getting Started

Having retired some 18 months ago, I've been picking up some woodworking skills and tools and it's obvious that you can never have enough of either, but particularly of the skills. I've got a 11×24 shop that has served me fairly well until I bought a hybrid table saw. Now, to do anything I drag one tool out of the way and drag the next one into place. It's boring work that I've put up with till a friend said 'Why don't you build a bigger shop?' I wasn't about to do that, but as time wore on the idea became more appealing until finally, I'll do it. So I went back to work to pay for it and hired a contractor friend, who wanted the work, to build it.

The plan was to start in the spring as soon as things dry out, usually in May or June. We'll here's a picture of one of many snowstorms we got through May into June.



That's not entirely unexpected for May but when the snow finally stopped in June we started getting severe hailstorms that caused lots of damage and kept everything soaked.

And another that occurred the last week of June:


We'll the storms have finally stopped and some of the trees are finally starting to bud out (yes July 7). We started excavation. Here's pictures of the location and footing trenches.

!



The new shop will be 24' x 24' with in floor heat. A couple windows and a door for cooling. I'll keep the old room for mechanicals like a compressor, dust control, and the boiler (hot water heater). I'm planning to put an electric subpanel in the new shop with plenty of 110 and 220 circuits.

That's all for now. I'll try to keep this blog going as things progress
great setting for a shop.i'm sure the new one will have plenty of space
 
Joined
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13,555 Posts
Getting Started

Having retired some 18 months ago, I've been picking up some woodworking skills and tools and it's obvious that you can never have enough of either, but particularly of the skills. I've got a 11×24 shop that has served me fairly well until I bought a hybrid table saw. Now, to do anything I drag one tool out of the way and drag the next one into place. It's boring work that I've put up with till a friend said 'Why don't you build a bigger shop?' I wasn't about to do that, but as time wore on the idea became more appealing until finally, I'll do it. So I went back to work to pay for it and hired a contractor friend, who wanted the work, to build it.

The plan was to start in the spring as soon as things dry out, usually in May or June. We'll here's a picture of one of many snowstorms we got through May into June.



That's not entirely unexpected for May but when the snow finally stopped in June we started getting severe hailstorms that caused lots of damage and kept everything soaked.

And another that occurred the last week of June:


We'll the storms have finally stopped and some of the trees are finally starting to bud out (yes July 7). We started excavation. Here's pictures of the location and footing trenches.

!



The new shop will be 24' x 24' with in floor heat. A couple windows and a door for cooling. I'll keep the old room for mechanicals like a compressor, dust control, and the boiler (hot water heater). I'm planning to put an electric subpanel in the new shop with plenty of 110 and 220 circuits.

That's all for now. I'll try to keep this blog going as things progress
You is off to a great start!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ready to pour

Not much to show as concrete is slow to take shape, or at least it seems to me. The builder Steve B got on the job today after spending a week floating Idaho's Salmon, the River of No Return. I didn't know it but the Salmon river gorge is deeper than the Grand Canyon. I'm going to have to see that.

We're ready to pour concrete and that will happen sometime this week, Friday at the latest. Here's a few pictures of the Pex tubing attached to the wire mesh. Underneath is a layer of bubble wrap insulation. When the monoslab gets poured the mesh with the tubing will get lifted into and suspended in the concrete. In the second photo you can see the supply and the return lines. There will be three zones in the shop and a fourth into a radiator in old shop.





Lastly I couldn't help but include a picture of last nights sunset. Till next week. Joe

 

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Ready to pour

Not much to show as concrete is slow to take shape, or at least it seems to me. The builder Steve B got on the job today after spending a week floating Idaho's Salmon, the River of No Return. I didn't know it but the Salmon river gorge is deeper than the Grand Canyon. I'm going to have to see that.

We're ready to pour concrete and that will happen sometime this week, Friday at the latest. Here's a few pictures of the Pex tubing attached to the wire mesh. Underneath is a layer of bubble wrap insulation. When the monoslab gets poured the mesh with the tubing will get lifted into and suspended in the concrete. In the second photo you can see the supply and the return lines. There will be three zones in the shop and a fourth into a radiator in old shop.





Lastly I couldn't help but include a picture of last nights sunset. Till next week. Joe

You are really going to enjoy that floor heat. I was born and raised across the border North of you in SASK.Cdn. I understand your weather very well. I really like when someone starts there project RIGHT.
 

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Ready to pour

Not much to show as concrete is slow to take shape, or at least it seems to me. The builder Steve B got on the job today after spending a week floating Idaho's Salmon, the River of No Return. I didn't know it but the Salmon river gorge is deeper than the Grand Canyon. I'm going to have to see that.

We're ready to pour concrete and that will happen sometime this week, Friday at the latest. Here's a few pictures of the Pex tubing attached to the wire mesh. Underneath is a layer of bubble wrap insulation. When the monoslab gets poured the mesh with the tubing will get lifted into and suspended in the concrete. In the second photo you can see the supply and the return lines. There will be three zones in the shop and a fourth into a radiator in old shop.





Lastly I couldn't help but include a picture of last nights sunset. Till next week. Joe

Nice…the birth of a new shop. It always brings a tear of joy to my eye.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What a difference a week makes

3 full days since the concrete was poured and things are moving quickly. Here is a picture from a distance.



The site work is largly finished and most of the framing is done.



There is good progress on the sheeting and I'm guessing that it will be done tomorrow, before the weekend.



Decided to sheet the interior with OSB instead of sheet-rock or plywood. Sheet-rock would have looked better but not as durable. Plywood would have cost about $10/sheet more.

You can see one of the window openings in this picture. That tree will keep a lot of the heat from the sun away.


That's all for this week's posting.
 

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What a difference a week makes

3 full days since the concrete was poured and things are moving quickly. Here is a picture from a distance.



The site work is largly finished and most of the framing is done.



There is good progress on the sheeting and I'm guessing that it will be done tomorrow, before the weekend.



Decided to sheet the interior with OSB instead of sheet-rock or plywood. Sheet-rock would have looked better but not as durable. Plywood would have cost about $10/sheet more.

You can see one of the window openings in this picture. That tree will keep a lot of the heat from the sun away.


That's all for this week's posting.
looking good so fare from this distance ..LOL
looking forward to se the finished shophouse

Dennis
 

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What a difference a week makes

3 full days since the concrete was poured and things are moving quickly. Here is a picture from a distance.



The site work is largly finished and most of the framing is done.



There is good progress on the sheeting and I'm guessing that it will be done tomorrow, before the weekend.



Decided to sheet the interior with OSB instead of sheet-rock or plywood. Sheet-rock would have looked better but not as durable. Plywood would have cost about $10/sheet more.

You can see one of the window openings in this picture. That tree will keep a lot of the heat from the sun away.


That's all for this week's posting.
Joe, this does look pretty good. It is always fun to be part of shop's evolution so keep the pictures coming.
 

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What a difference a week makes

3 full days since the concrete was poured and things are moving quickly. Here is a picture from a distance.



The site work is largly finished and most of the framing is done.



There is good progress on the sheeting and I'm guessing that it will be done tomorrow, before the weekend.



Decided to sheet the interior with OSB instead of sheet-rock or plywood. Sheet-rock would have looked better but not as durable. Plywood would have cost about $10/sheet more.

You can see one of the window openings in this picture. That tree will keep a lot of the heat from the sun away.


That's all for this week's posting.
OSB on the interior walls is what I did.
You may want to seal or paint it for easy clean up and light reflection.
 

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What a difference a week makes

3 full days since the concrete was poured and things are moving quickly. Here is a picture from a distance.



The site work is largly finished and most of the framing is done.



There is good progress on the sheeting and I'm guessing that it will be done tomorrow, before the weekend.



Decided to sheet the interior with OSB instead of sheet-rock or plywood. Sheet-rock would have looked better but not as durable. Plywood would have cost about $10/sheet more.

You can see one of the window openings in this picture. That tree will keep a lot of the heat from the sun away.


That's all for this week's posting.
Looks good to me. I agree OSB on the inside is the right thing. Cant wait to see this finished
 

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What a difference a week makes

3 full days since the concrete was poured and things are moving quickly. Here is a picture from a distance.



The site work is largly finished and most of the framing is done.



There is good progress on the sheeting and I'm guessing that it will be done tomorrow, before the weekend.



Decided to sheet the interior with OSB instead of sheet-rock or plywood. Sheet-rock would have looked better but not as durable. Plywood would have cost about $10/sheet more.

You can see one of the window openings in this picture. That tree will keep a lot of the heat from the sun away.


That's all for this week's posting.
well, i'm jealous.
 

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2,604 Posts
What a difference a week makes

3 full days since the concrete was poured and things are moving quickly. Here is a picture from a distance.



The site work is largly finished and most of the framing is done.



There is good progress on the sheeting and I'm guessing that it will be done tomorrow, before the weekend.



Decided to sheet the interior with OSB instead of sheet-rock or plywood. Sheet-rock would have looked better but not as durable. Plywood would have cost about $10/sheet more.

You can see one of the window openings in this picture. That tree will keep a lot of the heat from the sun away.


That's all for this week's posting.
I do hope you plan to insulate the shop? Nice size, location, view, in short, perfect!

Erwin, Jacksonville, FL
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Still moving quickly

I finally made it into the new space and got to check out how things are going to fit. At 24×24 (576 sq ft) the area seems huge. But I suppose that will get smaller as it gets built-out and tools moved in.


I've gotten some great suggestions and tips for building this shop right from you folks at LJ, so keep your comments coming. They are much appreciated. Responding to earlier comments, I am planning to paint the interior walls & ceiling semi glossy white for easier cleanup and light reflection and am insulating and sealing the structure well. Even with in-floor heat, the winters are cold and long enough to make heating costs a concern.

Here are some more pics.

The framing is done and the exterior sheeting is going up.


The structure is wrapped, the windows and doors are in. Steve B is clowning around with Carpenter Jane.


This picture shows how well the windows are wrapped and is indicative of the overall quality.


With Larry's help, most of the steel roofing is on and we've turning our attention to the electrical.


In the main panel we'll swap out some fat 220 (electric baseboard heat) for slimmer 220 breakers so we'd have room for the 50 amp breaker feeding the shop subpanel.


In the sub panel well have 2 runs of 110 outlets. Some of the outlets on the common wall will be fed from the old shop. And 1 run for the lighting. I'll put a 30 amp 220 outlet right next to the subpanel. It won't be hard to run additional 220 later but I just don't have the tools or the need for it now.


Here is how densely the outlets are placed. A duplex box about every 6'.


Next week we'll finish the electric and the exterior and sheet the interior. Sometime we'll turn our attention to the heater, compressed air and vacuum. Planning to use a hot water heater for the boiler and am looking for an old radiator to heat the old shop. I've got compressed air real close to the new shop so will just tap into the 1/2" copper for that. The air lines are currently overhead but they get in the way any time I use them. This time I'll put a hose connector in the wall and trip over the hose on the floor.

It's still a dilemma about what to do with the vacuum. I'll put the new HF special in the old shop, run a connector straight through to the new shop, and use an expandable hose to each tool as I use it. I'll run permanent vacuum to a miter saw bench that hasn't been built but may be the first project in the new shop. When the tools find a final destination I may or may not run permanent vacuum hoses.

That's about all for this week.
 

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13,523 Posts
Still moving quickly

I finally made it into the new space and got to check out how things are going to fit. At 24×24 (576 sq ft) the area seems huge. But I suppose that will get smaller as it gets built-out and tools moved in.


I've gotten some great suggestions and tips for building this shop right from you folks at LJ, so keep your comments coming. They are much appreciated. Responding to earlier comments, I am planning to paint the interior walls & ceiling semi glossy white for easier cleanup and light reflection and am insulating and sealing the structure well. Even with in-floor heat, the winters are cold and long enough to make heating costs a concern.

Here are some more pics.

The framing is done and the exterior sheeting is going up.


The structure is wrapped, the windows and doors are in. Steve B is clowning around with Carpenter Jane.


This picture shows how well the windows are wrapped and is indicative of the overall quality.


With Larry's help, most of the steel roofing is on and we've turning our attention to the electrical.


In the main panel we'll swap out some fat 220 (electric baseboard heat) for slimmer 220 breakers so we'd have room for the 50 amp breaker feeding the shop subpanel.


In the sub panel well have 2 runs of 110 outlets. Some of the outlets on the common wall will be fed from the old shop. And 1 run for the lighting. I'll put a 30 amp 220 outlet right next to the subpanel. It won't be hard to run additional 220 later but I just don't have the tools or the need for it now.


Here is how densely the outlets are placed. A duplex box about every 6'.


Next week we'll finish the electric and the exterior and sheet the interior. Sometime we'll turn our attention to the heater, compressed air and vacuum. Planning to use a hot water heater for the boiler and am looking for an old radiator to heat the old shop. I've got compressed air real close to the new shop so will just tap into the 1/2" copper for that. The air lines are currently overhead but they get in the way any time I use them. This time I'll put a hose connector in the wall and trip over the hose on the floor.

It's still a dilemma about what to do with the vacuum. I'll put the new HF special in the old shop, run a connector straight through to the new shop, and use an expandable hose to each tool as I use it. I'll run permanent vacuum to a miter saw bench that hasn't been built but may be the first project in the new shop. When the tools find a final destination I may or may not run permanent vacuum hoses.

That's about all for this week.
Your shop is coming along nicely. Looking forward to seeing the finished shop. Thanks for posting.

God Bless
tom
 
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