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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Build Begins!

OK, time to start a new project. I've decided to create a new bedroom set. This project will probably last thru the summer but this weekend was the beginning of the build. First, let's start with the bad news:



This danger zone is my current Master Bedroom. It's sleeping, storage and disaster all rolled into one. The rest of the house is lovingly nurtured and cared for, but the Master Bedroom has always been on the "someday" list. Well…it's someday. This complete makeover will involve all new furniture - designed and made in the shop, as well as some interior decorating to make the space livable.

As with any good bedroom, the most important piece of furniture will be the bed. I made a SketchUp model of what I'm thinking:



My design is based on a Missions theme with a few proportion and detail changes. The bed size will be California King, which is pretty big. By comparison, the current bed is only a Full. I special ordered the California King mattress and box spring last week, it should be here in 4 to 6 weeks, so I have that long to build the bed. This design is a little plain but I'm planning on making further changes as I get more into it, but it's enough to get me started.

This weekend I decided to start with the 80 slats (40 on the headboard, 40 on the footboard). This will be my first big mortise and tenon project, so why not start with 160 tenons on day one. I purchased a tenoning jig (the Grizzly H7583) and this is my first chance to use it. Here it is on my SawStop contractors saw:



Each slat will be 3/4" wide, 5/8" deep and 22 1/4" long (with tenons). Each tenon is 1/4" x 1/4" and 1/2" long. I made 85 guessing I'll have a few extra. Here they are piling up:



Later this week I'll start on the mortises. I'll also stain the slats before assembly. It's always fun the first week of a big project. I see all the possibilities and nothing's gone wrong yet :)

On the decorating side, there are some long lead items that I have to order tomorrow. I'm going with a wallpaper boarder along the ceiling:



There's also a window treatment and paint samples that I'm looking at. Everything has to work together. I'm also doing research into the other pieces of furniture and I think I'll swap out the ceiling fan.

Check back every week or so to watch the progress. Thanks for your time.
-d
 

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2,385 Posts
The Build Begins!

OK, time to start a new project. I've decided to create a new bedroom set. This project will probably last thru the summer but this weekend was the beginning of the build. First, let's start with the bad news:



This danger zone is my current Master Bedroom. It's sleeping, storage and disaster all rolled into one. The rest of the house is lovingly nurtured and cared for, but the Master Bedroom has always been on the "someday" list. Well…it's someday. This complete makeover will involve all new furniture - designed and made in the shop, as well as some interior decorating to make the space livable.

As with any good bedroom, the most important piece of furniture will be the bed. I made a SketchUp model of what I'm thinking:



My design is based on a Missions theme with a few proportion and detail changes. The bed size will be California King, which is pretty big. By comparison, the current bed is only a Full. I special ordered the California King mattress and box spring last week, it should be here in 4 to 6 weeks, so I have that long to build the bed. This design is a little plain but I'm planning on making further changes as I get more into it, but it's enough to get me started.

This weekend I decided to start with the 80 slats (40 on the headboard, 40 on the footboard). This will be my first big mortise and tenon project, so why not start with 160 tenons on day one. I purchased a tenoning jig (the Grizzly H7583) and this is my first chance to use it. Here it is on my SawStop contractors saw:



Each slat will be 3/4" wide, 5/8" deep and 22 1/4" long (with tenons). Each tenon is 1/4" x 1/4" and 1/2" long. I made 85 guessing I'll have a few extra. Here they are piling up:



Later this week I'll start on the mortises. I'll also stain the slats before assembly. It's always fun the first week of a big project. I see all the possibilities and nothing's gone wrong yet :)

On the decorating side, there are some long lead items that I have to order tomorrow. I'm going with a wallpaper boarder along the ceiling:



There's also a window treatment and paint samples that I'm looking at. Everything has to work together. I'm also doing research into the other pieces of furniture and I think I'll swap out the ceiling fan.

Check back every week or so to watch the progress. Thanks for your time.
-d
Looks like you have a good start, please keep us informed with a lot of pictures too?
 

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27,252 Posts
The Build Begins!

OK, time to start a new project. I've decided to create a new bedroom set. This project will probably last thru the summer but this weekend was the beginning of the build. First, let's start with the bad news:



This danger zone is my current Master Bedroom. It's sleeping, storage and disaster all rolled into one. The rest of the house is lovingly nurtured and cared for, but the Master Bedroom has always been on the "someday" list. Well…it's someday. This complete makeover will involve all new furniture - designed and made in the shop, as well as some interior decorating to make the space livable.

As with any good bedroom, the most important piece of furniture will be the bed. I made a SketchUp model of what I'm thinking:



My design is based on a Missions theme with a few proportion and detail changes. The bed size will be California King, which is pretty big. By comparison, the current bed is only a Full. I special ordered the California King mattress and box spring last week, it should be here in 4 to 6 weeks, so I have that long to build the bed. This design is a little plain but I'm planning on making further changes as I get more into it, but it's enough to get me started.

This weekend I decided to start with the 80 slats (40 on the headboard, 40 on the footboard). This will be my first big mortise and tenon project, so why not start with 160 tenons on day one. I purchased a tenoning jig (the Grizzly H7583) and this is my first chance to use it. Here it is on my SawStop contractors saw:



Each slat will be 3/4" wide, 5/8" deep and 22 1/4" long (with tenons). Each tenon is 1/4" x 1/4" and 1/2" long. I made 85 guessing I'll have a few extra. Here they are piling up:



Later this week I'll start on the mortises. I'll also stain the slats before assembly. It's always fun the first week of a big project. I see all the possibilities and nothing's gone wrong yet :)

On the decorating side, there are some long lead items that I have to order tomorrow. I'm going with a wallpaper boarder along the ceiling:



There's also a window treatment and paint samples that I'm looking at. Everything has to work together. I'm also doing research into the other pieces of furniture and I think I'll swap out the ceiling fan.

Check back every week or so to watch the progress. Thanks for your time.
-d
I have to agree with John. As a fan of mission style furniture I am going to enjoy following this series.
 

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13,523 Posts
The Build Begins!

OK, time to start a new project. I've decided to create a new bedroom set. This project will probably last thru the summer but this weekend was the beginning of the build. First, let's start with the bad news:



This danger zone is my current Master Bedroom. It's sleeping, storage and disaster all rolled into one. The rest of the house is lovingly nurtured and cared for, but the Master Bedroom has always been on the "someday" list. Well…it's someday. This complete makeover will involve all new furniture - designed and made in the shop, as well as some interior decorating to make the space livable.

As with any good bedroom, the most important piece of furniture will be the bed. I made a SketchUp model of what I'm thinking:



My design is based on a Missions theme with a few proportion and detail changes. The bed size will be California King, which is pretty big. By comparison, the current bed is only a Full. I special ordered the California King mattress and box spring last week, it should be here in 4 to 6 weeks, so I have that long to build the bed. This design is a little plain but I'm planning on making further changes as I get more into it, but it's enough to get me started.

This weekend I decided to start with the 80 slats (40 on the headboard, 40 on the footboard). This will be my first big mortise and tenon project, so why not start with 160 tenons on day one. I purchased a tenoning jig (the Grizzly H7583) and this is my first chance to use it. Here it is on my SawStop contractors saw:



Each slat will be 3/4" wide, 5/8" deep and 22 1/4" long (with tenons). Each tenon is 1/4" x 1/4" and 1/2" long. I made 85 guessing I'll have a few extra. Here they are piling up:



Later this week I'll start on the mortises. I'll also stain the slats before assembly. It's always fun the first week of a big project. I see all the possibilities and nothing's gone wrong yet :)

On the decorating side, there are some long lead items that I have to order tomorrow. I'm going with a wallpaper boarder along the ceiling:



There's also a window treatment and paint samples that I'm looking at. Everything has to work together. I'm also doing research into the other pieces of furniture and I think I'll swap out the ceiling fan.

Check back every week or so to watch the progress. Thanks for your time.
-d
Hi Dave

Your first picture reminded me of my daughters bedroom when she lived at home. Only Kidding! Great looking design and very informative post you have here. I will be looking forward to your progress on this project.

God Bless
tom
 
Joined
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13,555 Posts
The Build Begins!

OK, time to start a new project. I've decided to create a new bedroom set. This project will probably last thru the summer but this weekend was the beginning of the build. First, let's start with the bad news:



This danger zone is my current Master Bedroom. It's sleeping, storage and disaster all rolled into one. The rest of the house is lovingly nurtured and cared for, but the Master Bedroom has always been on the "someday" list. Well…it's someday. This complete makeover will involve all new furniture - designed and made in the shop, as well as some interior decorating to make the space livable.

As with any good bedroom, the most important piece of furniture will be the bed. I made a SketchUp model of what I'm thinking:



My design is based on a Missions theme with a few proportion and detail changes. The bed size will be California King, which is pretty big. By comparison, the current bed is only a Full. I special ordered the California King mattress and box spring last week, it should be here in 4 to 6 weeks, so I have that long to build the bed. This design is a little plain but I'm planning on making further changes as I get more into it, but it's enough to get me started.

This weekend I decided to start with the 80 slats (40 on the headboard, 40 on the footboard). This will be my first big mortise and tenon project, so why not start with 160 tenons on day one. I purchased a tenoning jig (the Grizzly H7583) and this is my first chance to use it. Here it is on my SawStop contractors saw:



Each slat will be 3/4" wide, 5/8" deep and 22 1/4" long (with tenons). Each tenon is 1/4" x 1/4" and 1/2" long. I made 85 guessing I'll have a few extra. Here they are piling up:



Later this week I'll start on the mortises. I'll also stain the slats before assembly. It's always fun the first week of a big project. I see all the possibilities and nothing's gone wrong yet :)

On the decorating side, there are some long lead items that I have to order tomorrow. I'm going with a wallpaper boarder along the ceiling:



There's also a window treatment and paint samples that I'm looking at. Everything has to work together. I'm also doing research into the other pieces of furniture and I think I'll swap out the ceiling fan.

Check back every week or so to watch the progress. Thanks for your time.
-d
You is off to a great start!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
How long do I have?

The leisurely 4 to 6 week project just became a 2 to 3 week project! The mattress and box spring arrived 4 weeks EARLY. They now sit in the middle of my living room taking up prime real estate:



This has given me renewed vigor to work nonstop to finish the project. I started the week working on all the mortises. This was my first time using my Delta mortising machine. It's pretty cool. Worked like a charm. I bought it a while ago and hadn't used it on a project until now.



I had to make almost 200 mortises, so it came in pretty handy. I used the 1/4" and 3/8" bits. I needed to add the collar extension for some of the mortises but it was pretty straight forward.



Lots of pieces of complex wood. This project is different from most of my other projects in that each piece of wood has a lot of work done to it before the assembly. I tend to design simpler components, but this is what was needed.



Remember to always keep your drawings and sketches close at hand. They saved me a couple of times:



Here is the bottom of the footboard before I started sanding for final shape. The initial cut was on my Jet band saw. I had a devil of a time drawing the original curve on the wood as a cut line. It's a circle of radius 208 inches.



I decided to add a 45 degree chamfer to the top of the headboard and footboard. So a quick route with the chamfering bit took off the edge.



I've started cutting the mortises for the 6" Bed Rail Fasteners:



It's all coming together. Most of the components are cut and ready to be finished, which I should start tomorrow by staining.

Room prep continues. Bought all the paint for the walls (and paint hardware). Ordered the fan and "stained glass" window treatment:



.


Had a minor accident. I was dry fitting a mortise and tenon joint to test the accuracy of the cuts - it was pretty snug. While trying to pull the two stuck pieces apart the piece came out with such force that I hit myself in the face with the end of the slat! (Yes I was wearing my safety glasses) It left 3 "rivulets" of blood on my lower cheek. It probably would have taken a tooth out had it hit me in the mouth. Not a big injury but it's a reminder; I've only been injured twice in the shop and NEITHER involved power tools. You can be hurt by anything. Always be vigilant with safety.

At this rate I should be done with the bed in about a week. Baring anymore surprises. I'm still working on the designs for the Night Stands (which will be next) and the Dresser and Chest of Drawers. I'll keep you posted. Thanks for your time.
-d
 

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Registered
Joined
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How long do I have?

The leisurely 4 to 6 week project just became a 2 to 3 week project! The mattress and box spring arrived 4 weeks EARLY. They now sit in the middle of my living room taking up prime real estate:



This has given me renewed vigor to work nonstop to finish the project. I started the week working on all the mortises. This was my first time using my Delta mortising machine. It's pretty cool. Worked like a charm. I bought it a while ago and hadn't used it on a project until now.



I had to make almost 200 mortises, so it came in pretty handy. I used the 1/4" and 3/8" bits. I needed to add the collar extension for some of the mortises but it was pretty straight forward.



Lots of pieces of complex wood. This project is different from most of my other projects in that each piece of wood has a lot of work done to it before the assembly. I tend to design simpler components, but this is what was needed.



Remember to always keep your drawings and sketches close at hand. They saved me a couple of times:



Here is the bottom of the footboard before I started sanding for final shape. The initial cut was on my Jet band saw. I had a devil of a time drawing the original curve on the wood as a cut line. It's a circle of radius 208 inches.



I decided to add a 45 degree chamfer to the top of the headboard and footboard. So a quick route with the chamfering bit took off the edge.



I've started cutting the mortises for the 6" Bed Rail Fasteners:



It's all coming together. Most of the components are cut and ready to be finished, which I should start tomorrow by staining.

Room prep continues. Bought all the paint for the walls (and paint hardware). Ordered the fan and "stained glass" window treatment:



.


Had a minor accident. I was dry fitting a mortise and tenon joint to test the accuracy of the cuts - it was pretty snug. While trying to pull the two stuck pieces apart the piece came out with such force that I hit myself in the face with the end of the slat! (Yes I was wearing my safety glasses) It left 3 "rivulets" of blood on my lower cheek. It probably would have taken a tooth out had it hit me in the mouth. Not a big injury but it's a reminder; I've only been injured twice in the shop and NEITHER involved power tools. You can be hurt by anything. Always be vigilant with safety.

At this rate I should be done with the bed in about a week. Baring anymore surprises. I'm still working on the designs for the Night Stands (which will be next) and the Dresser and Chest of Drawers. I'll keep you posted. Thanks for your time.
-d
I really like that vice on your bench!! Is it a Jorgensen? I also like the bench, Did you build it? Anyway GREAT job on the bed. Its looking very nice and that matress looks comfortable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
How long do I have?

The leisurely 4 to 6 week project just became a 2 to 3 week project! The mattress and box spring arrived 4 weeks EARLY. They now sit in the middle of my living room taking up prime real estate:



This has given me renewed vigor to work nonstop to finish the project. I started the week working on all the mortises. This was my first time using my Delta mortising machine. It's pretty cool. Worked like a charm. I bought it a while ago and hadn't used it on a project until now.



I had to make almost 200 mortises, so it came in pretty handy. I used the 1/4" and 3/8" bits. I needed to add the collar extension for some of the mortises but it was pretty straight forward.



Lots of pieces of complex wood. This project is different from most of my other projects in that each piece of wood has a lot of work done to it before the assembly. I tend to design simpler components, but this is what was needed.



Remember to always keep your drawings and sketches close at hand. They saved me a couple of times:



Here is the bottom of the footboard before I started sanding for final shape. The initial cut was on my Jet band saw. I had a devil of a time drawing the original curve on the wood as a cut line. It's a circle of radius 208 inches.



I decided to add a 45 degree chamfer to the top of the headboard and footboard. So a quick route with the chamfering bit took off the edge.



I've started cutting the mortises for the 6" Bed Rail Fasteners:



It's all coming together. Most of the components are cut and ready to be finished, which I should start tomorrow by staining.

Room prep continues. Bought all the paint for the walls (and paint hardware). Ordered the fan and "stained glass" window treatment:



.


Had a minor accident. I was dry fitting a mortise and tenon joint to test the accuracy of the cuts - it was pretty snug. While trying to pull the two stuck pieces apart the piece came out with such force that I hit myself in the face with the end of the slat! (Yes I was wearing my safety glasses) It left 3 "rivulets" of blood on my lower cheek. It probably would have taken a tooth out had it hit me in the mouth. Not a big injury but it's a reminder; I've only been injured twice in the shop and NEITHER involved power tools. You can be hurt by anything. Always be vigilant with safety.

At this rate I should be done with the bed in about a week. Baring anymore surprises. I'm still working on the designs for the Night Stands (which will be next) and the Dresser and Chest of Drawers. I'll keep you posted. Thanks for your time.
-d
Thanks Jed, it's coming along. The vice is a Tucker Vise by Veritas:

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=31143&cat=1,41659

It's a nice tool. The bench is also from Veritas:

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=31152&cat=1,41637

The twin-screw vice on the far end is also quite handy. I bought dogs, pups and assorted bench clamps to go with it. I know it's considered good form to build your own bench, but this one's awful darn nice.
-d
 

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Registered
Joined
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27,252 Posts
How long do I have?

The leisurely 4 to 6 week project just became a 2 to 3 week project! The mattress and box spring arrived 4 weeks EARLY. They now sit in the middle of my living room taking up prime real estate:



This has given me renewed vigor to work nonstop to finish the project. I started the week working on all the mortises. This was my first time using my Delta mortising machine. It's pretty cool. Worked like a charm. I bought it a while ago and hadn't used it on a project until now.



I had to make almost 200 mortises, so it came in pretty handy. I used the 1/4" and 3/8" bits. I needed to add the collar extension for some of the mortises but it was pretty straight forward.



Lots of pieces of complex wood. This project is different from most of my other projects in that each piece of wood has a lot of work done to it before the assembly. I tend to design simpler components, but this is what was needed.



Remember to always keep your drawings and sketches close at hand. They saved me a couple of times:



Here is the bottom of the footboard before I started sanding for final shape. The initial cut was on my Jet band saw. I had a devil of a time drawing the original curve on the wood as a cut line. It's a circle of radius 208 inches.



I decided to add a 45 degree chamfer to the top of the headboard and footboard. So a quick route with the chamfering bit took off the edge.



I've started cutting the mortises for the 6" Bed Rail Fasteners:



It's all coming together. Most of the components are cut and ready to be finished, which I should start tomorrow by staining.

Room prep continues. Bought all the paint for the walls (and paint hardware). Ordered the fan and "stained glass" window treatment:



.


Had a minor accident. I was dry fitting a mortise and tenon joint to test the accuracy of the cuts - it was pretty snug. While trying to pull the two stuck pieces apart the piece came out with such force that I hit myself in the face with the end of the slat! (Yes I was wearing my safety glasses) It left 3 "rivulets" of blood on my lower cheek. It probably would have taken a tooth out had it hit me in the mouth. Not a big injury but it's a reminder; I've only been injured twice in the shop and NEITHER involved power tools. You can be hurt by anything. Always be vigilant with safety.

At this rate I should be done with the bed in about a week. Baring anymore surprises. I'm still working on the designs for the Night Stands (which will be next) and the Dresser and Chest of Drawers. I'll keep you posted. Thanks for your time.
-d
Dave, this is an interesting post to follow. I know that the thrill of cutting all those mortises wore off after the first few were completed but the end result is going to be well worth the effort. This is looking pretty good so far.
 

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How long do I have?

The leisurely 4 to 6 week project just became a 2 to 3 week project! The mattress and box spring arrived 4 weeks EARLY. They now sit in the middle of my living room taking up prime real estate:



This has given me renewed vigor to work nonstop to finish the project. I started the week working on all the mortises. This was my first time using my Delta mortising machine. It's pretty cool. Worked like a charm. I bought it a while ago and hadn't used it on a project until now.



I had to make almost 200 mortises, so it came in pretty handy. I used the 1/4" and 3/8" bits. I needed to add the collar extension for some of the mortises but it was pretty straight forward.



Lots of pieces of complex wood. This project is different from most of my other projects in that each piece of wood has a lot of work done to it before the assembly. I tend to design simpler components, but this is what was needed.



Remember to always keep your drawings and sketches close at hand. They saved me a couple of times:



Here is the bottom of the footboard before I started sanding for final shape. The initial cut was on my Jet band saw. I had a devil of a time drawing the original curve on the wood as a cut line. It's a circle of radius 208 inches.



I decided to add a 45 degree chamfer to the top of the headboard and footboard. So a quick route with the chamfering bit took off the edge.



I've started cutting the mortises for the 6" Bed Rail Fasteners:



It's all coming together. Most of the components are cut and ready to be finished, which I should start tomorrow by staining.

Room prep continues. Bought all the paint for the walls (and paint hardware). Ordered the fan and "stained glass" window treatment:



.


Had a minor accident. I was dry fitting a mortise and tenon joint to test the accuracy of the cuts - it was pretty snug. While trying to pull the two stuck pieces apart the piece came out with such force that I hit myself in the face with the end of the slat! (Yes I was wearing my safety glasses) It left 3 "rivulets" of blood on my lower cheek. It probably would have taken a tooth out had it hit me in the mouth. Not a big injury but it's a reminder; I've only been injured twice in the shop and NEITHER involved power tools. You can be hurt by anything. Always be vigilant with safety.

At this rate I should be done with the bed in about a week. Baring anymore surprises. I'm still working on the designs for the Night Stands (which will be next) and the Dresser and Chest of Drawers. I'll keep you posted. Thanks for your time.
-d
Looking good.

Where do you buy your lumber?
 

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Registered
Joined
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13,523 Posts
How long do I have?

The leisurely 4 to 6 week project just became a 2 to 3 week project! The mattress and box spring arrived 4 weeks EARLY. They now sit in the middle of my living room taking up prime real estate:



This has given me renewed vigor to work nonstop to finish the project. I started the week working on all the mortises. This was my first time using my Delta mortising machine. It's pretty cool. Worked like a charm. I bought it a while ago and hadn't used it on a project until now.



I had to make almost 200 mortises, so it came in pretty handy. I used the 1/4" and 3/8" bits. I needed to add the collar extension for some of the mortises but it was pretty straight forward.



Lots of pieces of complex wood. This project is different from most of my other projects in that each piece of wood has a lot of work done to it before the assembly. I tend to design simpler components, but this is what was needed.



Remember to always keep your drawings and sketches close at hand. They saved me a couple of times:



Here is the bottom of the footboard before I started sanding for final shape. The initial cut was on my Jet band saw. I had a devil of a time drawing the original curve on the wood as a cut line. It's a circle of radius 208 inches.



I decided to add a 45 degree chamfer to the top of the headboard and footboard. So a quick route with the chamfering bit took off the edge.



I've started cutting the mortises for the 6" Bed Rail Fasteners:



It's all coming together. Most of the components are cut and ready to be finished, which I should start tomorrow by staining.

Room prep continues. Bought all the paint for the walls (and paint hardware). Ordered the fan and "stained glass" window treatment:



.


Had a minor accident. I was dry fitting a mortise and tenon joint to test the accuracy of the cuts - it was pretty snug. While trying to pull the two stuck pieces apart the piece came out with such force that I hit myself in the face with the end of the slat! (Yes I was wearing my safety glasses) It left 3 "rivulets" of blood on my lower cheek. It probably would have taken a tooth out had it hit me in the mouth. Not a big injury but it's a reminder; I've only been injured twice in the shop and NEITHER involved power tools. You can be hurt by anything. Always be vigilant with safety.

At this rate I should be done with the bed in about a week. Baring anymore surprises. I'm still working on the designs for the Night Stands (which will be next) and the Dresser and Chest of Drawers. I'll keep you posted. Thanks for your time.
-d
Hi Dave

Sorry to hear about your minor accident. Hope you are alright. Very nice posting once again. Looking forward to seeing the completed piece. Also would love to see the completed room. I am sure it will be exquisite when done. Thanks for posting.

God Bless
tom
 

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61 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
How long do I have?

The leisurely 4 to 6 week project just became a 2 to 3 week project! The mattress and box spring arrived 4 weeks EARLY. They now sit in the middle of my living room taking up prime real estate:



This has given me renewed vigor to work nonstop to finish the project. I started the week working on all the mortises. This was my first time using my Delta mortising machine. It's pretty cool. Worked like a charm. I bought it a while ago and hadn't used it on a project until now.



I had to make almost 200 mortises, so it came in pretty handy. I used the 1/4" and 3/8" bits. I needed to add the collar extension for some of the mortises but it was pretty straight forward.



Lots of pieces of complex wood. This project is different from most of my other projects in that each piece of wood has a lot of work done to it before the assembly. I tend to design simpler components, but this is what was needed.



Remember to always keep your drawings and sketches close at hand. They saved me a couple of times:



Here is the bottom of the footboard before I started sanding for final shape. The initial cut was on my Jet band saw. I had a devil of a time drawing the original curve on the wood as a cut line. It's a circle of radius 208 inches.



I decided to add a 45 degree chamfer to the top of the headboard and footboard. So a quick route with the chamfering bit took off the edge.



I've started cutting the mortises for the 6" Bed Rail Fasteners:



It's all coming together. Most of the components are cut and ready to be finished, which I should start tomorrow by staining.

Room prep continues. Bought all the paint for the walls (and paint hardware). Ordered the fan and "stained glass" window treatment:



.


Had a minor accident. I was dry fitting a mortise and tenon joint to test the accuracy of the cuts - it was pretty snug. While trying to pull the two stuck pieces apart the piece came out with such force that I hit myself in the face with the end of the slat! (Yes I was wearing my safety glasses) It left 3 "rivulets" of blood on my lower cheek. It probably would have taken a tooth out had it hit me in the mouth. Not a big injury but it's a reminder; I've only been injured twice in the shop and NEITHER involved power tools. You can be hurt by anything. Always be vigilant with safety.

At this rate I should be done with the bed in about a week. Baring anymore surprises. I'm still working on the designs for the Night Stands (which will be next) and the Dresser and Chest of Drawers. I'll keep you posted. Thanks for your time.
-d
John,
I'm always looking for more wood places. The wood for this project was bought at good olde Lowe's. It's all Oak (the slats holding up the mattress are Poplar).

Tom,
I will definitely show pix of the room as it too is in a state of becoming.
-d
 

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How long do I have?

The leisurely 4 to 6 week project just became a 2 to 3 week project! The mattress and box spring arrived 4 weeks EARLY. They now sit in the middle of my living room taking up prime real estate:



This has given me renewed vigor to work nonstop to finish the project. I started the week working on all the mortises. This was my first time using my Delta mortising machine. It's pretty cool. Worked like a charm. I bought it a while ago and hadn't used it on a project until now.



I had to make almost 200 mortises, so it came in pretty handy. I used the 1/4" and 3/8" bits. I needed to add the collar extension for some of the mortises but it was pretty straight forward.



Lots of pieces of complex wood. This project is different from most of my other projects in that each piece of wood has a lot of work done to it before the assembly. I tend to design simpler components, but this is what was needed.



Remember to always keep your drawings and sketches close at hand. They saved me a couple of times:



Here is the bottom of the footboard before I started sanding for final shape. The initial cut was on my Jet band saw. I had a devil of a time drawing the original curve on the wood as a cut line. It's a circle of radius 208 inches.



I decided to add a 45 degree chamfer to the top of the headboard and footboard. So a quick route with the chamfering bit took off the edge.



I've started cutting the mortises for the 6" Bed Rail Fasteners:



It's all coming together. Most of the components are cut and ready to be finished, which I should start tomorrow by staining.

Room prep continues. Bought all the paint for the walls (and paint hardware). Ordered the fan and "stained glass" window treatment:



.


Had a minor accident. I was dry fitting a mortise and tenon joint to test the accuracy of the cuts - it was pretty snug. While trying to pull the two stuck pieces apart the piece came out with such force that I hit myself in the face with the end of the slat! (Yes I was wearing my safety glasses) It left 3 "rivulets" of blood on my lower cheek. It probably would have taken a tooth out had it hit me in the mouth. Not a big injury but it's a reminder; I've only been injured twice in the shop and NEITHER involved power tools. You can be hurt by anything. Always be vigilant with safety.

At this rate I should be done with the bed in about a week. Baring anymore surprises. I'm still working on the designs for the Night Stands (which will be next) and the Dresser and Chest of Drawers. I'll keep you posted. Thanks for your time.
-d
Dave…......that's alot of mortices. I like your scrap piece of paper with the math and sketches. I was talking to a guy yesterday and we joked about all the shop notes that accumulate on scrap pieces of paper and wood. This fellow woodworker mentioned how its fun to find the scraps over time as a reminder of previous work or even the proverbial what the heck was I figuring here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
How long do I have?

The leisurely 4 to 6 week project just became a 2 to 3 week project! The mattress and box spring arrived 4 weeks EARLY. They now sit in the middle of my living room taking up prime real estate:



This has given me renewed vigor to work nonstop to finish the project. I started the week working on all the mortises. This was my first time using my Delta mortising machine. It's pretty cool. Worked like a charm. I bought it a while ago and hadn't used it on a project until now.



I had to make almost 200 mortises, so it came in pretty handy. I used the 1/4" and 3/8" bits. I needed to add the collar extension for some of the mortises but it was pretty straight forward.



Lots of pieces of complex wood. This project is different from most of my other projects in that each piece of wood has a lot of work done to it before the assembly. I tend to design simpler components, but this is what was needed.



Remember to always keep your drawings and sketches close at hand. They saved me a couple of times:



Here is the bottom of the footboard before I started sanding for final shape. The initial cut was on my Jet band saw. I had a devil of a time drawing the original curve on the wood as a cut line. It's a circle of radius 208 inches.



I decided to add a 45 degree chamfer to the top of the headboard and footboard. So a quick route with the chamfering bit took off the edge.



I've started cutting the mortises for the 6" Bed Rail Fasteners:



It's all coming together. Most of the components are cut and ready to be finished, which I should start tomorrow by staining.

Room prep continues. Bought all the paint for the walls (and paint hardware). Ordered the fan and "stained glass" window treatment:



.


Had a minor accident. I was dry fitting a mortise and tenon joint to test the accuracy of the cuts - it was pretty snug. While trying to pull the two stuck pieces apart the piece came out with such force that I hit myself in the face with the end of the slat! (Yes I was wearing my safety glasses) It left 3 "rivulets" of blood on my lower cheek. It probably would have taken a tooth out had it hit me in the mouth. Not a big injury but it's a reminder; I've only been injured twice in the shop and NEITHER involved power tools. You can be hurt by anything. Always be vigilant with safety.

At this rate I should be done with the bed in about a week. Baring anymore surprises. I'm still working on the designs for the Night Stands (which will be next) and the Dresser and Chest of Drawers. I'll keep you posted. Thanks for your time.
-d
Neil,
I keep all my scrap paper. I actually keep a notebook of all the plans and scrap I've used for all my projects. I'm not exactly sure why yet, since I don't go back and rebuild anything. But it's nice to know I have some record of what I was trying to build in the first place. Math has served me well but I often use both fractions and decimals on the same drawings…yea I know, but I still think both ways.
-d
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Some Assembly Required

Alright, we're close to the end! Finished the last of the glue-ups. I know, it looks like an ad for Bessy. Each of the four posts had the corbels attached:



Next came the staining. This is the first project I've ever done where all parts were completed then stained completely unassembled. All of my other projects have had the majority of the piece assembled before staining. Here I went with Minwax Red Oak #215:



I started with all the spindles. This took a couple of hours. I used a foam brush and placed them on little makeshift rails to keep them off the ground while drying:



The rest of the staining went quickly by comparison. I usually just layout a 9'x12' 2mil tarp and dispose of it when done:



Here are the head, foot, side and top rails after staining. The side rails have metal on the ends (side bed rail fasteners) and screws holding up the lip of the rail where the slats will lay:



I took each of the spindles and segregated them by color - there was a slight variation after staining. this allowed me to group the lighter ones for the footboard and the darker ones for the headboard. Keep in mind the color differences where minor. Here is the bottom footboard rail with the first few spindles attached. They went in with a few taps of the dead blow hammer. I made 83 spindles and didn't need to use any of the 3 spares. I was sure I'd break at least one, but fortunately all joints went surprisingly well. Here they are starting from the center of the footboard.



As each spindle went in I began to see the bed forming. It sounds funny, but until this point it was just a collection of parts. But like magic before my eyes I started to see a piece of furniture.



Here is one of the details that I obsessed over in the original design. The spindles were originally going to be 3/4" x 3/4". The width of the mortised rail is 3/4" and that would have placed the spindles flush with the front and back of the rail. I decided I wanted to have a slight lip instead of flush. I came to that conclusion while looking closely at the computer model. It's one of the reasons I model everything first. This allowed me to reduce the depth of the spindles from 3/4" to 5/8", giving me a 1/16" lip in the front and back:



Here's a peek at the fully assembled footboard. I'm using a strap clamp to hold it tight while the side mortise and tenon joints soak up the glue.

The top rail is attached at the end posts with a vertical biscuit. This allowed me to keep to my promise of not using any metal in the headboard and footboard (except for the 2 side rail fasteners).



Tomorrow it'll be time for Polyurethaning. The next post should have the finished bed. Thanks for your time.
-d
 

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Some Assembly Required

Alright, we're close to the end! Finished the last of the glue-ups. I know, it looks like an ad for Bessy. Each of the four posts had the corbels attached:



Next came the staining. This is the first project I've ever done where all parts were completed then stained completely unassembled. All of my other projects have had the majority of the piece assembled before staining. Here I went with Minwax Red Oak #215:



I started with all the spindles. This took a couple of hours. I used a foam brush and placed them on little makeshift rails to keep them off the ground while drying:



The rest of the staining went quickly by comparison. I usually just layout a 9'x12' 2mil tarp and dispose of it when done:



Here are the head, foot, side and top rails after staining. The side rails have metal on the ends (side bed rail fasteners) and screws holding up the lip of the rail where the slats will lay:



I took each of the spindles and segregated them by color - there was a slight variation after staining. this allowed me to group the lighter ones for the footboard and the darker ones for the headboard. Keep in mind the color differences where minor. Here is the bottom footboard rail with the first few spindles attached. They went in with a few taps of the dead blow hammer. I made 83 spindles and didn't need to use any of the 3 spares. I was sure I'd break at least one, but fortunately all joints went surprisingly well. Here they are starting from the center of the footboard.



As each spindle went in I began to see the bed forming. It sounds funny, but until this point it was just a collection of parts. But like magic before my eyes I started to see a piece of furniture.



Here is one of the details that I obsessed over in the original design. The spindles were originally going to be 3/4" x 3/4". The width of the mortised rail is 3/4" and that would have placed the spindles flush with the front and back of the rail. I decided I wanted to have a slight lip instead of flush. I came to that conclusion while looking closely at the computer model. It's one of the reasons I model everything first. This allowed me to reduce the depth of the spindles from 3/4" to 5/8", giving me a 1/16" lip in the front and back:



Here's a peek at the fully assembled footboard. I'm using a strap clamp to hold it tight while the side mortise and tenon joints soak up the glue.

The top rail is attached at the end posts with a vertical biscuit. This allowed me to keep to my promise of not using any metal in the headboard and footboard (except for the 2 side rail fasteners).



Tomorrow it'll be time for Polyurethaning. The next post should have the finished bed. Thanks for your time.
-d
I'm currently looking at building a bed with the same design.
Did you buy pre-milled lumber or did you get them all true yourself?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Some Assembly Required

Alright, we're close to the end! Finished the last of the glue-ups. I know, it looks like an ad for Bessy. Each of the four posts had the corbels attached:



Next came the staining. This is the first project I've ever done where all parts were completed then stained completely unassembled. All of my other projects have had the majority of the piece assembled before staining. Here I went with Minwax Red Oak #215:



I started with all the spindles. This took a couple of hours. I used a foam brush and placed them on little makeshift rails to keep them off the ground while drying:



The rest of the staining went quickly by comparison. I usually just layout a 9'x12' 2mil tarp and dispose of it when done:



Here are the head, foot, side and top rails after staining. The side rails have metal on the ends (side bed rail fasteners) and screws holding up the lip of the rail where the slats will lay:



I took each of the spindles and segregated them by color - there was a slight variation after staining. this allowed me to group the lighter ones for the footboard and the darker ones for the headboard. Keep in mind the color differences where minor. Here is the bottom footboard rail with the first few spindles attached. They went in with a few taps of the dead blow hammer. I made 83 spindles and didn't need to use any of the 3 spares. I was sure I'd break at least one, but fortunately all joints went surprisingly well. Here they are starting from the center of the footboard.



As each spindle went in I began to see the bed forming. It sounds funny, but until this point it was just a collection of parts. But like magic before my eyes I started to see a piece of furniture.



Here is one of the details that I obsessed over in the original design. The spindles were originally going to be 3/4" x 3/4". The width of the mortised rail is 3/4" and that would have placed the spindles flush with the front and back of the rail. I decided I wanted to have a slight lip instead of flush. I came to that conclusion while looking closely at the computer model. It's one of the reasons I model everything first. This allowed me to reduce the depth of the spindles from 3/4" to 5/8", giving me a 1/16" lip in the front and back:



Here's a peek at the fully assembled footboard. I'm using a strap clamp to hold it tight while the side mortise and tenon joints soak up the glue.

The top rail is attached at the end posts with a vertical biscuit. This allowed me to keep to my promise of not using any metal in the headboard and footboard (except for the 2 side rail fasteners).



Tomorrow it'll be time for Polyurethaning. The next post should have the finished bed. Thanks for your time.
-d
Vincent,
I bought pre-milled lumber from Lowe's. It's all Oak. I do have a planer and jointer but I don't use them very often.
-d
 

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Some Assembly Required

Alright, we're close to the end! Finished the last of the glue-ups. I know, it looks like an ad for Bessy. Each of the four posts had the corbels attached:



Next came the staining. This is the first project I've ever done where all parts were completed then stained completely unassembled. All of my other projects have had the majority of the piece assembled before staining. Here I went with Minwax Red Oak #215:



I started with all the spindles. This took a couple of hours. I used a foam brush and placed them on little makeshift rails to keep them off the ground while drying:



The rest of the staining went quickly by comparison. I usually just layout a 9'x12' 2mil tarp and dispose of it when done:



Here are the head, foot, side and top rails after staining. The side rails have metal on the ends (side bed rail fasteners) and screws holding up the lip of the rail where the slats will lay:



I took each of the spindles and segregated them by color - there was a slight variation after staining. this allowed me to group the lighter ones for the footboard and the darker ones for the headboard. Keep in mind the color differences where minor. Here is the bottom footboard rail with the first few spindles attached. They went in with a few taps of the dead blow hammer. I made 83 spindles and didn't need to use any of the 3 spares. I was sure I'd break at least one, but fortunately all joints went surprisingly well. Here they are starting from the center of the footboard.



As each spindle went in I began to see the bed forming. It sounds funny, but until this point it was just a collection of parts. But like magic before my eyes I started to see a piece of furniture.



Here is one of the details that I obsessed over in the original design. The spindles were originally going to be 3/4" x 3/4". The width of the mortised rail is 3/4" and that would have placed the spindles flush with the front and back of the rail. I decided I wanted to have a slight lip instead of flush. I came to that conclusion while looking closely at the computer model. It's one of the reasons I model everything first. This allowed me to reduce the depth of the spindles from 3/4" to 5/8", giving me a 1/16" lip in the front and back:



Here's a peek at the fully assembled footboard. I'm using a strap clamp to hold it tight while the side mortise and tenon joints soak up the glue.

The top rail is attached at the end posts with a vertical biscuit. This allowed me to keep to my promise of not using any metal in the headboard and footboard (except for the 2 side rail fasteners).



Tomorrow it'll be time for Polyurethaning. The next post should have the finished bed. Thanks for your time.
-d
Looks great….good job…I like the color…very nice.
 

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Some Assembly Required

Alright, we're close to the end! Finished the last of the glue-ups. I know, it looks like an ad for Bessy. Each of the four posts had the corbels attached:



Next came the staining. This is the first project I've ever done where all parts were completed then stained completely unassembled. All of my other projects have had the majority of the piece assembled before staining. Here I went with Minwax Red Oak #215:



I started with all the spindles. This took a couple of hours. I used a foam brush and placed them on little makeshift rails to keep them off the ground while drying:



The rest of the staining went quickly by comparison. I usually just layout a 9'x12' 2mil tarp and dispose of it when done:



Here are the head, foot, side and top rails after staining. The side rails have metal on the ends (side bed rail fasteners) and screws holding up the lip of the rail where the slats will lay:



I took each of the spindles and segregated them by color - there was a slight variation after staining. this allowed me to group the lighter ones for the footboard and the darker ones for the headboard. Keep in mind the color differences where minor. Here is the bottom footboard rail with the first few spindles attached. They went in with a few taps of the dead blow hammer. I made 83 spindles and didn't need to use any of the 3 spares. I was sure I'd break at least one, but fortunately all joints went surprisingly well. Here they are starting from the center of the footboard.



As each spindle went in I began to see the bed forming. It sounds funny, but until this point it was just a collection of parts. But like magic before my eyes I started to see a piece of furniture.



Here is one of the details that I obsessed over in the original design. The spindles were originally going to be 3/4" x 3/4". The width of the mortised rail is 3/4" and that would have placed the spindles flush with the front and back of the rail. I decided I wanted to have a slight lip instead of flush. I came to that conclusion while looking closely at the computer model. It's one of the reasons I model everything first. This allowed me to reduce the depth of the spindles from 3/4" to 5/8", giving me a 1/16" lip in the front and back:



Here's a peek at the fully assembled footboard. I'm using a strap clamp to hold it tight while the side mortise and tenon joints soak up the glue.

The top rail is attached at the end posts with a vertical biscuit. This allowed me to keep to my promise of not using any metal in the headboard and footboard (except for the 2 side rail fasteners).



Tomorrow it'll be time for Polyurethaning. The next post should have the finished bed. Thanks for your time.
-d
Dave, this looks really good. As I have often said I am a fan of mission style furniture. It is a lot of work to build one of these (the thrill of cutting all those m&t joints wore off quickly, I am sure) but I like the reveal that you decided to add. It gives the bed a nice visual detail.

Nice job so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Some Assembly Required

Alright, we're close to the end! Finished the last of the glue-ups. I know, it looks like an ad for Bessy. Each of the four posts had the corbels attached:



Next came the staining. This is the first project I've ever done where all parts were completed then stained completely unassembled. All of my other projects have had the majority of the piece assembled before staining. Here I went with Minwax Red Oak #215:



I started with all the spindles. This took a couple of hours. I used a foam brush and placed them on little makeshift rails to keep them off the ground while drying:



The rest of the staining went quickly by comparison. I usually just layout a 9'x12' 2mil tarp and dispose of it when done:



Here are the head, foot, side and top rails after staining. The side rails have metal on the ends (side bed rail fasteners) and screws holding up the lip of the rail where the slats will lay:



I took each of the spindles and segregated them by color - there was a slight variation after staining. this allowed me to group the lighter ones for the footboard and the darker ones for the headboard. Keep in mind the color differences where minor. Here is the bottom footboard rail with the first few spindles attached. They went in with a few taps of the dead blow hammer. I made 83 spindles and didn't need to use any of the 3 spares. I was sure I'd break at least one, but fortunately all joints went surprisingly well. Here they are starting from the center of the footboard.



As each spindle went in I began to see the bed forming. It sounds funny, but until this point it was just a collection of parts. But like magic before my eyes I started to see a piece of furniture.



Here is one of the details that I obsessed over in the original design. The spindles were originally going to be 3/4" x 3/4". The width of the mortised rail is 3/4" and that would have placed the spindles flush with the front and back of the rail. I decided I wanted to have a slight lip instead of flush. I came to that conclusion while looking closely at the computer model. It's one of the reasons I model everything first. This allowed me to reduce the depth of the spindles from 3/4" to 5/8", giving me a 1/16" lip in the front and back:



Here's a peek at the fully assembled footboard. I'm using a strap clamp to hold it tight while the side mortise and tenon joints soak up the glue.

The top rail is attached at the end posts with a vertical biscuit. This allowed me to keep to my promise of not using any metal in the headboard and footboard (except for the 2 side rail fasteners).



Tomorrow it'll be time for Polyurethaning. The next post should have the finished bed. Thanks for your time.
-d
Thanks Todd and Scott. It's sooooo close to being done. I need to paint the bedroom today so I have a place to put it. We'll see if I have the strength.
-d
 
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