LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,659 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
step up to the stand

I wasn't totally happy with the former workbench, turned lathe stand. So, when we moved, I re-purposed that to be the outfeed table for my table saw, and set about planning a new one for my mini lathe.

I had a couple plans that I'd almost made - but would have had to buy or salvage the right pieces. One was a great, and HEAVY, made with plywood and filled with sand. Twice, I almost started that one… but the idea of something lighter with properly splayed legs appealed more. We will be moving again afterall. Moving the shopsmith is killer enough. Lets not make a 300# lathe stand too! So plans were sketched out and brought to about 90%.... but the question I was most curious to entertain, was what could I make with what I had on hand? Something nice, and functional, that didn't look like I was just making do?

In the meantime I'd been using the lathe just sitting on the old folding workmate clamping table. Surprisingly that worked really well. just about the right height, and quite stable - until yesterday when I tried turning an eccentric piece. The lathe finally walked a bit…. So I decided not to keep putting off the "new" lathe stand.

I needed to build a top approx 10" by 20" with roughly 32" from the feet of the lathe to the floor. (To center the quill with my elbow height.) I'd seen many plans with a mere 5 degree angle to the legs being adequate to lower the center of gravity enough to reduce vibration, walking & tipping hazard while keeping the weight down.

I saved some pieces of the old house for this project. Specifically the old basement workshop stairs. One of the stingers and a support post. Circa 1880.

The stringer:




First up, to work out a plan where I could use the old lumber without having to fit in a bit of something else "new" that would stand out like a sore thumb. After trimming off the notched portions for the stairs, I had a 2.25×7" x 75" piece for the legs. Enough for two wide legs if I went with a trestle style leg, or 4 smaller splayed ones.

The post:



The central supporting post to the stairs. Still quite heavy and "fuzzy." Luckily it sanded smooth enough without losing any of the old mill marks. 60" long, and larger than a true 2×4. It also had, a nice long bow to it. No doubt due to 128 years of holding up the stairs.

If I was going to use just lumber from the old house for this stand - Oh the arbitrary "rules" that guide a project - I don't think I'd quite have enough for the top, and stretchers (and/or feet). As I looked around the shop for appropriate materials to also call into service. My little one, while looking for a place to sit and "work". Asked why didn't I use this piece (the one I just set down as a work surface for her) as my table top.



This is one of a few pieces I have (thick slabs of maple) used for book binding. It is a piece my Grandfather saved from his years in publishing, and passed them along to me with the rhetorical, "can you use this for something?"

She totally halted my train of thought. I think I was prepared to say no…. but… Hmmm. You know. Yes, that would actually be perfect.

I ripped a couple inches off each side (twas originally over 15×24) to bring the top closer to the dimensions I want, and put them in service as the aprons. To help keep the top flat and help with attaching the legs. It also occured to me to use the edges of a second one of these slabs (one that is already cracked down the middle, for the feet. A nice design tie-in to the top.






Look at that clean grain inside!

The legs, and cross rail will be made exclusively from the old shop stairs - mere inches from where I set up my first lathe! The top, and feet would be made from these printing relics from my grandfather. Furthermore, I'll try to alter them as little as possible, to honor where they've come from, and make for a nice conversation piece.

OK. Design decisions made. Trestle style legs, and long feet for stability (and ease of figuring out compound angles) - similar to my saw bench.

The legs



legs, aprons and rail. The latter, hand cut and rived out of that support post. Nice straight grained oak! Not too bad to cut, a dream to chisel to the line. Hand cut mortice and tenon joinery baby!... I've long wanted to make something by hand like this. Dare I use my inherited brace and bit to rough out the mortices? Ah, why not. The legs are nice air dried pine.



Not a bad afternoons effort. From a couple of old pieces of wood cluttering up the shop to a fully roughed out frame and finished top. Next up, mortising the legs, making the feet and fitting it all together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
step up to the stand

I wasn't totally happy with the former workbench, turned lathe stand. So, when we moved, I re-purposed that to be the outfeed table for my table saw, and set about planning a new one for my mini lathe.

I had a couple plans that I'd almost made - but would have had to buy or salvage the right pieces. One was a great, and HEAVY, made with plywood and filled with sand. Twice, I almost started that one… but the idea of something lighter with properly splayed legs appealed more. We will be moving again afterall. Moving the shopsmith is killer enough. Lets not make a 300# lathe stand too! So plans were sketched out and brought to about 90%.... but the question I was most curious to entertain, was what could I make with what I had on hand? Something nice, and functional, that didn't look like I was just making do?

In the meantime I'd been using the lathe just sitting on the old folding workmate clamping table. Surprisingly that worked really well. just about the right height, and quite stable - until yesterday when I tried turning an eccentric piece. The lathe finally walked a bit…. So I decided not to keep putting off the "new" lathe stand.

I needed to build a top approx 10" by 20" with roughly 32" from the feet of the lathe to the floor. (To center the quill with my elbow height.) I'd seen many plans with a mere 5 degree angle to the legs being adequate to lower the center of gravity enough to reduce vibration, walking & tipping hazard while keeping the weight down.

I saved some pieces of the old house for this project. Specifically the old basement workshop stairs. One of the stingers and a support post. Circa 1880.

The stringer:




First up, to work out a plan where I could use the old lumber without having to fit in a bit of something else "new" that would stand out like a sore thumb. After trimming off the notched portions for the stairs, I had a 2.25×7" x 75" piece for the legs. Enough for two wide legs if I went with a trestle style leg, or 4 smaller splayed ones.

The post:



The central supporting post to the stairs. Still quite heavy and "fuzzy." Luckily it sanded smooth enough without losing any of the old mill marks. 60" long, and larger than a true 2×4. It also had, a nice long bow to it. No doubt due to 128 years of holding up the stairs.

If I was going to use just lumber from the old house for this stand - Oh the arbitrary "rules" that guide a project - I don't think I'd quite have enough for the top, and stretchers (and/or feet). As I looked around the shop for appropriate materials to also call into service. My little one, while looking for a place to sit and "work". Asked why didn't I use this piece (the one I just set down as a work surface for her) as my table top.



This is one of a few pieces I have (thick slabs of maple) used for book binding. It is a piece my Grandfather saved from his years in publishing, and passed them along to me with the rhetorical, "can you use this for something?"

She totally halted my train of thought. I think I was prepared to say no…. but… Hmmm. You know. Yes, that would actually be perfect.

I ripped a couple inches off each side (twas originally over 15×24) to bring the top closer to the dimensions I want, and put them in service as the aprons. To help keep the top flat and help with attaching the legs. It also occured to me to use the edges of a second one of these slabs (one that is already cracked down the middle, for the feet. A nice design tie-in to the top.






Look at that clean grain inside!

The legs, and cross rail will be made exclusively from the old shop stairs - mere inches from where I set up my first lathe! The top, and feet would be made from these printing relics from my grandfather. Furthermore, I'll try to alter them as little as possible, to honor where they've come from, and make for a nice conversation piece.

OK. Design decisions made. Trestle style legs, and long feet for stability (and ease of figuring out compound angles) - similar to my saw bench.

The legs



legs, aprons and rail. The latter, hand cut and rived out of that support post. Nice straight grained oak! Not too bad to cut, a dream to chisel to the line. Hand cut mortice and tenon joinery baby!... I've long wanted to make something by hand like this. Dare I use my inherited brace and bit to rough out the mortices? Ah, why not. The legs are nice air dried pine.



Not a bad afternoons effort. From a couple of old pieces of wood cluttering up the shop to a fully roughed out frame and finished top. Next up, mortising the legs, making the feet and fitting it all together.
Scott:

Nice start on you lathe stand. Nice use of family recycled supplies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,743 Posts
step up to the stand

I wasn't totally happy with the former workbench, turned lathe stand. So, when we moved, I re-purposed that to be the outfeed table for my table saw, and set about planning a new one for my mini lathe.

I had a couple plans that I'd almost made - but would have had to buy or salvage the right pieces. One was a great, and HEAVY, made with plywood and filled with sand. Twice, I almost started that one… but the idea of something lighter with properly splayed legs appealed more. We will be moving again afterall. Moving the shopsmith is killer enough. Lets not make a 300# lathe stand too! So plans were sketched out and brought to about 90%.... but the question I was most curious to entertain, was what could I make with what I had on hand? Something nice, and functional, that didn't look like I was just making do?

In the meantime I'd been using the lathe just sitting on the old folding workmate clamping table. Surprisingly that worked really well. just about the right height, and quite stable - until yesterday when I tried turning an eccentric piece. The lathe finally walked a bit…. So I decided not to keep putting off the "new" lathe stand.

I needed to build a top approx 10" by 20" with roughly 32" from the feet of the lathe to the floor. (To center the quill with my elbow height.) I'd seen many plans with a mere 5 degree angle to the legs being adequate to lower the center of gravity enough to reduce vibration, walking & tipping hazard while keeping the weight down.

I saved some pieces of the old house for this project. Specifically the old basement workshop stairs. One of the stingers and a support post. Circa 1880.

The stringer:




First up, to work out a plan where I could use the old lumber without having to fit in a bit of something else "new" that would stand out like a sore thumb. After trimming off the notched portions for the stairs, I had a 2.25×7" x 75" piece for the legs. Enough for two wide legs if I went with a trestle style leg, or 4 smaller splayed ones.

The post:



The central supporting post to the stairs. Still quite heavy and "fuzzy." Luckily it sanded smooth enough without losing any of the old mill marks. 60" long, and larger than a true 2×4. It also had, a nice long bow to it. No doubt due to 128 years of holding up the stairs.

If I was going to use just lumber from the old house for this stand - Oh the arbitrary "rules" that guide a project - I don't think I'd quite have enough for the top, and stretchers (and/or feet). As I looked around the shop for appropriate materials to also call into service. My little one, while looking for a place to sit and "work". Asked why didn't I use this piece (the one I just set down as a work surface for her) as my table top.



This is one of a few pieces I have (thick slabs of maple) used for book binding. It is a piece my Grandfather saved from his years in publishing, and passed them along to me with the rhetorical, "can you use this for something?"

She totally halted my train of thought. I think I was prepared to say no…. but… Hmmm. You know. Yes, that would actually be perfect.

I ripped a couple inches off each side (twas originally over 15×24) to bring the top closer to the dimensions I want, and put them in service as the aprons. To help keep the top flat and help with attaching the legs. It also occured to me to use the edges of a second one of these slabs (one that is already cracked down the middle, for the feet. A nice design tie-in to the top.






Look at that clean grain inside!

The legs, and cross rail will be made exclusively from the old shop stairs - mere inches from where I set up my first lathe! The top, and feet would be made from these printing relics from my grandfather. Furthermore, I'll try to alter them as little as possible, to honor where they've come from, and make for a nice conversation piece.

OK. Design decisions made. Trestle style legs, and long feet for stability (and ease of figuring out compound angles) - similar to my saw bench.

The legs



legs, aprons and rail. The latter, hand cut and rived out of that support post. Nice straight grained oak! Not too bad to cut, a dream to chisel to the line. Hand cut mortice and tenon joinery baby!... I've long wanted to make something by hand like this. Dare I use my inherited brace and bit to rough out the mortices? Ah, why not. The legs are nice air dried pine.



Not a bad afternoons effort. From a couple of old pieces of wood cluttering up the shop to a fully roughed out frame and finished top. Next up, mortising the legs, making the feet and fitting it all together.
Scott, Now that is a new on recycling materials to make a lathe stand. Can't wait to see the finished project… Keep us informed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,861 Posts
step up to the stand

I wasn't totally happy with the former workbench, turned lathe stand. So, when we moved, I re-purposed that to be the outfeed table for my table saw, and set about planning a new one for my mini lathe.

I had a couple plans that I'd almost made - but would have had to buy or salvage the right pieces. One was a great, and HEAVY, made with plywood and filled with sand. Twice, I almost started that one… but the idea of something lighter with properly splayed legs appealed more. We will be moving again afterall. Moving the shopsmith is killer enough. Lets not make a 300# lathe stand too! So plans were sketched out and brought to about 90%.... but the question I was most curious to entertain, was what could I make with what I had on hand? Something nice, and functional, that didn't look like I was just making do?

In the meantime I'd been using the lathe just sitting on the old folding workmate clamping table. Surprisingly that worked really well. just about the right height, and quite stable - until yesterday when I tried turning an eccentric piece. The lathe finally walked a bit…. So I decided not to keep putting off the "new" lathe stand.

I needed to build a top approx 10" by 20" with roughly 32" from the feet of the lathe to the floor. (To center the quill with my elbow height.) I'd seen many plans with a mere 5 degree angle to the legs being adequate to lower the center of gravity enough to reduce vibration, walking & tipping hazard while keeping the weight down.

I saved some pieces of the old house for this project. Specifically the old basement workshop stairs. One of the stingers and a support post. Circa 1880.

The stringer:




First up, to work out a plan where I could use the old lumber without having to fit in a bit of something else "new" that would stand out like a sore thumb. After trimming off the notched portions for the stairs, I had a 2.25×7" x 75" piece for the legs. Enough for two wide legs if I went with a trestle style leg, or 4 smaller splayed ones.

The post:



The central supporting post to the stairs. Still quite heavy and "fuzzy." Luckily it sanded smooth enough without losing any of the old mill marks. 60" long, and larger than a true 2×4. It also had, a nice long bow to it. No doubt due to 128 years of holding up the stairs.

If I was going to use just lumber from the old house for this stand - Oh the arbitrary "rules" that guide a project - I don't think I'd quite have enough for the top, and stretchers (and/or feet). As I looked around the shop for appropriate materials to also call into service. My little one, while looking for a place to sit and "work". Asked why didn't I use this piece (the one I just set down as a work surface for her) as my table top.



This is one of a few pieces I have (thick slabs of maple) used for book binding. It is a piece my Grandfather saved from his years in publishing, and passed them along to me with the rhetorical, "can you use this for something?"

She totally halted my train of thought. I think I was prepared to say no…. but… Hmmm. You know. Yes, that would actually be perfect.

I ripped a couple inches off each side (twas originally over 15×24) to bring the top closer to the dimensions I want, and put them in service as the aprons. To help keep the top flat and help with attaching the legs. It also occured to me to use the edges of a second one of these slabs (one that is already cracked down the middle, for the feet. A nice design tie-in to the top.






Look at that clean grain inside!

The legs, and cross rail will be made exclusively from the old shop stairs - mere inches from where I set up my first lathe! The top, and feet would be made from these printing relics from my grandfather. Furthermore, I'll try to alter them as little as possible, to honor where they've come from, and make for a nice conversation piece.

OK. Design decisions made. Trestle style legs, and long feet for stability (and ease of figuring out compound angles) - similar to my saw bench.

The legs



legs, aprons and rail. The latter, hand cut and rived out of that support post. Nice straight grained oak! Not too bad to cut, a dream to chisel to the line. Hand cut mortice and tenon joinery baby!... I've long wanted to make something by hand like this. Dare I use my inherited brace and bit to rough out the mortices? Ah, why not. The legs are nice air dried pine.



Not a bad afternoons effort. From a couple of old pieces of wood cluttering up the shop to a fully roughed out frame and finished top. Next up, mortising the legs, making the feet and fitting it all together.
Nice pictorial, we'll be watching for more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
step up to the stand

I wasn't totally happy with the former workbench, turned lathe stand. So, when we moved, I re-purposed that to be the outfeed table for my table saw, and set about planning a new one for my mini lathe.

I had a couple plans that I'd almost made - but would have had to buy or salvage the right pieces. One was a great, and HEAVY, made with plywood and filled with sand. Twice, I almost started that one… but the idea of something lighter with properly splayed legs appealed more. We will be moving again afterall. Moving the shopsmith is killer enough. Lets not make a 300# lathe stand too! So plans were sketched out and brought to about 90%.... but the question I was most curious to entertain, was what could I make with what I had on hand? Something nice, and functional, that didn't look like I was just making do?

In the meantime I'd been using the lathe just sitting on the old folding workmate clamping table. Surprisingly that worked really well. just about the right height, and quite stable - until yesterday when I tried turning an eccentric piece. The lathe finally walked a bit…. So I decided not to keep putting off the "new" lathe stand.

I needed to build a top approx 10" by 20" with roughly 32" from the feet of the lathe to the floor. (To center the quill with my elbow height.) I'd seen many plans with a mere 5 degree angle to the legs being adequate to lower the center of gravity enough to reduce vibration, walking & tipping hazard while keeping the weight down.

I saved some pieces of the old house for this project. Specifically the old basement workshop stairs. One of the stingers and a support post. Circa 1880.

The stringer:




First up, to work out a plan where I could use the old lumber without having to fit in a bit of something else "new" that would stand out like a sore thumb. After trimming off the notched portions for the stairs, I had a 2.25×7" x 75" piece for the legs. Enough for two wide legs if I went with a trestle style leg, or 4 smaller splayed ones.

The post:



The central supporting post to the stairs. Still quite heavy and "fuzzy." Luckily it sanded smooth enough without losing any of the old mill marks. 60" long, and larger than a true 2×4. It also had, a nice long bow to it. No doubt due to 128 years of holding up the stairs.

If I was going to use just lumber from the old house for this stand - Oh the arbitrary "rules" that guide a project - I don't think I'd quite have enough for the top, and stretchers (and/or feet). As I looked around the shop for appropriate materials to also call into service. My little one, while looking for a place to sit and "work". Asked why didn't I use this piece (the one I just set down as a work surface for her) as my table top.



This is one of a few pieces I have (thick slabs of maple) used for book binding. It is a piece my Grandfather saved from his years in publishing, and passed them along to me with the rhetorical, "can you use this for something?"

She totally halted my train of thought. I think I was prepared to say no…. but… Hmmm. You know. Yes, that would actually be perfect.

I ripped a couple inches off each side (twas originally over 15×24) to bring the top closer to the dimensions I want, and put them in service as the aprons. To help keep the top flat and help with attaching the legs. It also occured to me to use the edges of a second one of these slabs (one that is already cracked down the middle, for the feet. A nice design tie-in to the top.






Look at that clean grain inside!

The legs, and cross rail will be made exclusively from the old shop stairs - mere inches from where I set up my first lathe! The top, and feet would be made from these printing relics from my grandfather. Furthermore, I'll try to alter them as little as possible, to honor where they've come from, and make for a nice conversation piece.

OK. Design decisions made. Trestle style legs, and long feet for stability (and ease of figuring out compound angles) - similar to my saw bench.

The legs



legs, aprons and rail. The latter, hand cut and rived out of that support post. Nice straight grained oak! Not too bad to cut, a dream to chisel to the line. Hand cut mortice and tenon joinery baby!... I've long wanted to make something by hand like this. Dare I use my inherited brace and bit to rough out the mortices? Ah, why not. The legs are nice air dried pine.



Not a bad afternoons effort. From a couple of old pieces of wood cluttering up the shop to a fully roughed out frame and finished top. Next up, mortising the legs, making the feet and fitting it all together.
Nice looking wood. The old stuff usually is.. Great save and looking forward to the finish. Tell my niece she did a good job helping think outside the box.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,659 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
putting the base together

I spent, (what started off as) a nice cool Saturday morning, cutting and fitting the mortise and tenons for the base.

Since I cut the tenons by hand, I figured I'd break out the brace and bit I inherited to drill out most of the waste for the mortices…. Not for a lack of trying, but I just couldn't get it to hold the bits… so I moved over to the shopsmith. It was still set up in drillpress mode afterall. Aligned the table height and fence, and two seconds later I had the first one drilled out. Oops I forgot a backerboard to prevent the massive chip out on the backside. the second piece came out a lot cleaner.



Over to the sawbench with chisel and Mallet (Texas Osage Orange from my Bro) to chop away the rest of the waste.



With a little elbow grease, and the help of a microplane liberated from the kitchen, I spent the remainder of the increasingly warmer and warmer morning, paring, filing and fitting.







It didn't occur to me to drill out the mortices at 5 degrees to match the angle of the legs, so I had to open them up a bit more than intended. but as I'd be wedging the tenons, it didn't matter much. Good practice and lessons learned before I give the Schwarz Roubo a shot.


Test fit before glue up. In days of old I'd have just gone with the glue up, and then had to live with (or fight with) the results.


Negligible, but a tiny bit of racking. I rasped just a wee bit more and everything fits nice and flat. Nicely (quickly and easily) saved.

Glued up, wedged tenons - with the same oak as the stretcher - and some help from the Gorilla. The glue I won for my birdhouse in fact. (One that stayed with the old house) A whole other level of recycling and reusing on this stand!







Yeah, the sides of the mortice aren't perfectly square. My rasping kind of rounded the sides a bit. That and some chip out on the outside faces is evident. But the tenons do fit in quite snugly.
I was going to wedge the tenons diagonally to fill in the gaps, but feared splitting the legs. I'll go for strength over appearance on this project. I suppose I could try to fill in the gaps with filler or some bits of wood… and I might. But it's supposed to be old, rustic and stout anyhow.

Next up - notching for the feet and attaching the top.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
putting the base together

I spent, (what started off as) a nice cool Saturday morning, cutting and fitting the mortise and tenons for the base.

Since I cut the tenons by hand, I figured I'd break out the brace and bit I inherited to drill out most of the waste for the mortices…. Not for a lack of trying, but I just couldn't get it to hold the bits… so I moved over to the shopsmith. It was still set up in drillpress mode afterall. Aligned the table height and fence, and two seconds later I had the first one drilled out. Oops I forgot a backerboard to prevent the massive chip out on the backside. the second piece came out a lot cleaner.



Over to the sawbench with chisel and Mallet (Texas Osage Orange from my Bro) to chop away the rest of the waste.



With a little elbow grease, and the help of a microplane liberated from the kitchen, I spent the remainder of the increasingly warmer and warmer morning, paring, filing and fitting.







It didn't occur to me to drill out the mortices at 5 degrees to match the angle of the legs, so I had to open them up a bit more than intended. but as I'd be wedging the tenons, it didn't matter much. Good practice and lessons learned before I give the Schwarz Roubo a shot.


Test fit before glue up. In days of old I'd have just gone with the glue up, and then had to live with (or fight with) the results.


Negligible, but a tiny bit of racking. I rasped just a wee bit more and everything fits nice and flat. Nicely (quickly and easily) saved.

Glued up, wedged tenons - with the same oak as the stretcher - and some help from the Gorilla. The glue I won for my birdhouse in fact. (One that stayed with the old house) A whole other level of recycling and reusing on this stand!







Yeah, the sides of the mortice aren't perfectly square. My rasping kind of rounded the sides a bit. That and some chip out on the outside faces is evident. But the tenons do fit in quite snugly.
I was going to wedge the tenons diagonally to fill in the gaps, but feared splitting the legs. I'll go for strength over appearance on this project. I suppose I could try to fill in the gaps with filler or some bits of wood… and I might. But it's supposed to be old, rustic and stout anyhow.

Next up - notching for the feet and attaching the top.
Looking great Scott.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,861 Posts
putting the base together

I spent, (what started off as) a nice cool Saturday morning, cutting and fitting the mortise and tenons for the base.

Since I cut the tenons by hand, I figured I'd break out the brace and bit I inherited to drill out most of the waste for the mortices…. Not for a lack of trying, but I just couldn't get it to hold the bits… so I moved over to the shopsmith. It was still set up in drillpress mode afterall. Aligned the table height and fence, and two seconds later I had the first one drilled out. Oops I forgot a backerboard to prevent the massive chip out on the backside. the second piece came out a lot cleaner.



Over to the sawbench with chisel and Mallet (Texas Osage Orange from my Bro) to chop away the rest of the waste.



With a little elbow grease, and the help of a microplane liberated from the kitchen, I spent the remainder of the increasingly warmer and warmer morning, paring, filing and fitting.







It didn't occur to me to drill out the mortices at 5 degrees to match the angle of the legs, so I had to open them up a bit more than intended. but as I'd be wedging the tenons, it didn't matter much. Good practice and lessons learned before I give the Schwarz Roubo a shot.


Test fit before glue up. In days of old I'd have just gone with the glue up, and then had to live with (or fight with) the results.


Negligible, but a tiny bit of racking. I rasped just a wee bit more and everything fits nice and flat. Nicely (quickly and easily) saved.

Glued up, wedged tenons - with the same oak as the stretcher - and some help from the Gorilla. The glue I won for my birdhouse in fact. (One that stayed with the old house) A whole other level of recycling and reusing on this stand!







Yeah, the sides of the mortice aren't perfectly square. My rasping kind of rounded the sides a bit. That and some chip out on the outside faces is evident. But the tenons do fit in quite snugly.
I was going to wedge the tenons diagonally to fill in the gaps, but feared splitting the legs. I'll go for strength over appearance on this project. I suppose I could try to fill in the gaps with filler or some bits of wood… and I might. But it's supposed to be old, rustic and stout anyhow.

Next up - notching for the feet and attaching the top.
It's coming along real nice Scott.

Do you have the regular bits for a brace & bit like these?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
putting the base together

I spent, (what started off as) a nice cool Saturday morning, cutting and fitting the mortise and tenons for the base.

Since I cut the tenons by hand, I figured I'd break out the brace and bit I inherited to drill out most of the waste for the mortices…. Not for a lack of trying, but I just couldn't get it to hold the bits… so I moved over to the shopsmith. It was still set up in drillpress mode afterall. Aligned the table height and fence, and two seconds later I had the first one drilled out. Oops I forgot a backerboard to prevent the massive chip out on the backside. the second piece came out a lot cleaner.



Over to the sawbench with chisel and Mallet (Texas Osage Orange from my Bro) to chop away the rest of the waste.



With a little elbow grease, and the help of a microplane liberated from the kitchen, I spent the remainder of the increasingly warmer and warmer morning, paring, filing and fitting.







It didn't occur to me to drill out the mortices at 5 degrees to match the angle of the legs, so I had to open them up a bit more than intended. but as I'd be wedging the tenons, it didn't matter much. Good practice and lessons learned before I give the Schwarz Roubo a shot.


Test fit before glue up. In days of old I'd have just gone with the glue up, and then had to live with (or fight with) the results.


Negligible, but a tiny bit of racking. I rasped just a wee bit more and everything fits nice and flat. Nicely (quickly and easily) saved.

Glued up, wedged tenons - with the same oak as the stretcher - and some help from the Gorilla. The glue I won for my birdhouse in fact. (One that stayed with the old house) A whole other level of recycling and reusing on this stand!







Yeah, the sides of the mortice aren't perfectly square. My rasping kind of rounded the sides a bit. That and some chip out on the outside faces is evident. But the tenons do fit in quite snugly.
I was going to wedge the tenons diagonally to fill in the gaps, but feared splitting the legs. I'll go for strength over appearance on this project. I suppose I could try to fill in the gaps with filler or some bits of wood… and I might. But it's supposed to be old, rustic and stout anyhow.

Next up - notching for the feet and attaching the top.
Looks good. So that's regluar Gorilla glue and not the Gorilla wood glue?.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
putting the base together

I spent, (what started off as) a nice cool Saturday morning, cutting and fitting the mortise and tenons for the base.

Since I cut the tenons by hand, I figured I'd break out the brace and bit I inherited to drill out most of the waste for the mortices…. Not for a lack of trying, but I just couldn't get it to hold the bits… so I moved over to the shopsmith. It was still set up in drillpress mode afterall. Aligned the table height and fence, and two seconds later I had the first one drilled out. Oops I forgot a backerboard to prevent the massive chip out on the backside. the second piece came out a lot cleaner.



Over to the sawbench with chisel and Mallet (Texas Osage Orange from my Bro) to chop away the rest of the waste.



With a little elbow grease, and the help of a microplane liberated from the kitchen, I spent the remainder of the increasingly warmer and warmer morning, paring, filing and fitting.







It didn't occur to me to drill out the mortices at 5 degrees to match the angle of the legs, so I had to open them up a bit more than intended. but as I'd be wedging the tenons, it didn't matter much. Good practice and lessons learned before I give the Schwarz Roubo a shot.


Test fit before glue up. In days of old I'd have just gone with the glue up, and then had to live with (or fight with) the results.


Negligible, but a tiny bit of racking. I rasped just a wee bit more and everything fits nice and flat. Nicely (quickly and easily) saved.

Glued up, wedged tenons - with the same oak as the stretcher - and some help from the Gorilla. The glue I won for my birdhouse in fact. (One that stayed with the old house) A whole other level of recycling and reusing on this stand!







Yeah, the sides of the mortice aren't perfectly square. My rasping kind of rounded the sides a bit. That and some chip out on the outside faces is evident. But the tenons do fit in quite snugly.
I was going to wedge the tenons diagonally to fill in the gaps, but feared splitting the legs. I'll go for strength over appearance on this project. I suppose I could try to fill in the gaps with filler or some bits of wood… and I might. But it's supposed to be old, rustic and stout anyhow.

Next up - notching for the feet and attaching the top.
Interesting post! Please keep us informed as you move along?
 

·
In Loving Memory
Joined
·
17,103 Posts
putting the base together

I spent, (what started off as) a nice cool Saturday morning, cutting and fitting the mortise and tenons for the base.

Since I cut the tenons by hand, I figured I'd break out the brace and bit I inherited to drill out most of the waste for the mortices…. Not for a lack of trying, but I just couldn't get it to hold the bits… so I moved over to the shopsmith. It was still set up in drillpress mode afterall. Aligned the table height and fence, and two seconds later I had the first one drilled out. Oops I forgot a backerboard to prevent the massive chip out on the backside. the second piece came out a lot cleaner.



Over to the sawbench with chisel and Mallet (Texas Osage Orange from my Bro) to chop away the rest of the waste.



With a little elbow grease, and the help of a microplane liberated from the kitchen, I spent the remainder of the increasingly warmer and warmer morning, paring, filing and fitting.







It didn't occur to me to drill out the mortices at 5 degrees to match the angle of the legs, so I had to open them up a bit more than intended. but as I'd be wedging the tenons, it didn't matter much. Good practice and lessons learned before I give the Schwarz Roubo a shot.


Test fit before glue up. In days of old I'd have just gone with the glue up, and then had to live with (or fight with) the results.


Negligible, but a tiny bit of racking. I rasped just a wee bit more and everything fits nice and flat. Nicely (quickly and easily) saved.

Glued up, wedged tenons - with the same oak as the stretcher - and some help from the Gorilla. The glue I won for my birdhouse in fact. (One that stayed with the old house) A whole other level of recycling and reusing on this stand!







Yeah, the sides of the mortice aren't perfectly square. My rasping kind of rounded the sides a bit. That and some chip out on the outside faces is evident. But the tenons do fit in quite snugly.
I was going to wedge the tenons diagonally to fill in the gaps, but feared splitting the legs. I'll go for strength over appearance on this project. I suppose I could try to fill in the gaps with filler or some bits of wood… and I might. But it's supposed to be old, rustic and stout anyhow.

Next up - notching for the feet and attaching the top.
Nice work Scott. I'm wondering why you chose the polyurethane (Gorrilla) glue. I'm not saying this to be critical as I'm sure it will work fine, but it is so messy. Why not a PVA or Titebond which is easier to work with? If you are going for waterproof, TB lll is that too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
putting the base together

I spent, (what started off as) a nice cool Saturday morning, cutting and fitting the mortise and tenons for the base.

Since I cut the tenons by hand, I figured I'd break out the brace and bit I inherited to drill out most of the waste for the mortices…. Not for a lack of trying, but I just couldn't get it to hold the bits… so I moved over to the shopsmith. It was still set up in drillpress mode afterall. Aligned the table height and fence, and two seconds later I had the first one drilled out. Oops I forgot a backerboard to prevent the massive chip out on the backside. the second piece came out a lot cleaner.



Over to the sawbench with chisel and Mallet (Texas Osage Orange from my Bro) to chop away the rest of the waste.



With a little elbow grease, and the help of a microplane liberated from the kitchen, I spent the remainder of the increasingly warmer and warmer morning, paring, filing and fitting.







It didn't occur to me to drill out the mortices at 5 degrees to match the angle of the legs, so I had to open them up a bit more than intended. but as I'd be wedging the tenons, it didn't matter much. Good practice and lessons learned before I give the Schwarz Roubo a shot.


Test fit before glue up. In days of old I'd have just gone with the glue up, and then had to live with (or fight with) the results.


Negligible, but a tiny bit of racking. I rasped just a wee bit more and everything fits nice and flat. Nicely (quickly and easily) saved.

Glued up, wedged tenons - with the same oak as the stretcher - and some help from the Gorilla. The glue I won for my birdhouse in fact. (One that stayed with the old house) A whole other level of recycling and reusing on this stand!







Yeah, the sides of the mortice aren't perfectly square. My rasping kind of rounded the sides a bit. That and some chip out on the outside faces is evident. But the tenons do fit in quite snugly.
I was going to wedge the tenons diagonally to fill in the gaps, but feared splitting the legs. I'll go for strength over appearance on this project. I suppose I could try to fill in the gaps with filler or some bits of wood… and I might. But it's supposed to be old, rustic and stout anyhow.

Next up - notching for the feet and attaching the top.
FWIW - stefang has the right idea, I agree.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,659 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
putting the base together

I spent, (what started off as) a nice cool Saturday morning, cutting and fitting the mortise and tenons for the base.

Since I cut the tenons by hand, I figured I'd break out the brace and bit I inherited to drill out most of the waste for the mortices…. Not for a lack of trying, but I just couldn't get it to hold the bits… so I moved over to the shopsmith. It was still set up in drillpress mode afterall. Aligned the table height and fence, and two seconds later I had the first one drilled out. Oops I forgot a backerboard to prevent the massive chip out on the backside. the second piece came out a lot cleaner.



Over to the sawbench with chisel and Mallet (Texas Osage Orange from my Bro) to chop away the rest of the waste.



With a little elbow grease, and the help of a microplane liberated from the kitchen, I spent the remainder of the increasingly warmer and warmer morning, paring, filing and fitting.







It didn't occur to me to drill out the mortices at 5 degrees to match the angle of the legs, so I had to open them up a bit more than intended. but as I'd be wedging the tenons, it didn't matter much. Good practice and lessons learned before I give the Schwarz Roubo a shot.


Test fit before glue up. In days of old I'd have just gone with the glue up, and then had to live with (or fight with) the results.


Negligible, but a tiny bit of racking. I rasped just a wee bit more and everything fits nice and flat. Nicely (quickly and easily) saved.

Glued up, wedged tenons - with the same oak as the stretcher - and some help from the Gorilla. The glue I won for my birdhouse in fact. (One that stayed with the old house) A whole other level of recycling and reusing on this stand!







Yeah, the sides of the mortice aren't perfectly square. My rasping kind of rounded the sides a bit. That and some chip out on the outside faces is evident. But the tenons do fit in quite snugly.
I was going to wedge the tenons diagonally to fill in the gaps, but feared splitting the legs. I'll go for strength over appearance on this project. I suppose I could try to fill in the gaps with filler or some bits of wood… and I might. But it's supposed to be old, rustic and stout anyhow.

Next up - notching for the feet and attaching the top.
Personally I do like me some Titebond, and it is my glue of choice, but…. honestly, most of my glues didn't survive the winter. And that bottle was found, unopened, in the house. nice and safe. Why run out to the store when I had an option that wasn't superglue. For some projects I don't mind the polyurethane glue, and it didn't really foam out, save for the exposed portions of the wedges that I will be cutting off anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,659 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
stand up

The second piece of old fashioned book binding equipment (nearly 2" thick Maple!) going into this project:



Removing metal hardware before running through the tablesaw. The mortising for it, done almost entirely by drill.



threaded metal rods run through both ends, cross grain. for rigidity? structural integrity? aid in glue up?



Didja guess #2?

Ok, so I knew this one had a split in it, but I didn't know how bad. Luckily the plan was to rip off both edges, like I did with the rails/apron for the top, to use as the feet. Also, luckily, the crack was so close to the middle, allowing for maximum foot depth. I thought I'd have to waste some time to glueing the slab back together, only to rip it apart!

One design consideration was to cut off the ends and join them to the edges for more of an interesting design element… But simplicity and practicality ruled in the end. The legs are splayed 5 degrees, and the feet should probably be as long as possible to match the same offset. from top to floor.

I ripped the feet as wide as possible:





and I still have a rather large piece from the middle of the slab left for another project or two!

I set those down to mark the height to notch out the legs. After already using the table saw to mark the vertical cuts, I finished off with my friend the pullsaw, Then chisel to pop off the waste on one side… a little to aggressive a bite, so I used the pull saw, for both cuts on the other leg. Not too bad, really.









Good fit.



But I think I'd like a bit less offset. Time to dado the feet… but this time, just this once, NOT by hand.

attached & glued.



The legs are indeed clamped to the table - a nice flat torsion box in the (former) guise of a hollow core door. Should make for things all nice and level. When all is said and done.

At least more level than the floor is likely to be… hence the beauty of those threaded rod holes. I can put on some threaded feed and adjust as needed… or it could be permanently mounted to the floor as well… in the next house, that is.

Next up, leveling and attaching the top… and making shavings baby!

(and brainstorming what to do with those leftoverhardware bits )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,743 Posts
stand up

The second piece of old fashioned book binding equipment (nearly 2" thick Maple!) going into this project:



Removing metal hardware before running through the tablesaw. The mortising for it, done almost entirely by drill.



threaded metal rods run through both ends, cross grain. for rigidity? structural integrity? aid in glue up?



Didja guess #2?

Ok, so I knew this one had a split in it, but I didn't know how bad. Luckily the plan was to rip off both edges, like I did with the rails/apron for the top, to use as the feet. Also, luckily, the crack was so close to the middle, allowing for maximum foot depth. I thought I'd have to waste some time to glueing the slab back together, only to rip it apart!

One design consideration was to cut off the ends and join them to the edges for more of an interesting design element… But simplicity and practicality ruled in the end. The legs are splayed 5 degrees, and the feet should probably be as long as possible to match the same offset. from top to floor.

I ripped the feet as wide as possible:





and I still have a rather large piece from the middle of the slab left for another project or two!

I set those down to mark the height to notch out the legs. After already using the table saw to mark the vertical cuts, I finished off with my friend the pullsaw, Then chisel to pop off the waste on one side… a little to aggressive a bite, so I used the pull saw, for both cuts on the other leg. Not too bad, really.









Good fit.



But I think I'd like a bit less offset. Time to dado the feet… but this time, just this once, NOT by hand.

attached & glued.



The legs are indeed clamped to the table - a nice flat torsion box in the (former) guise of a hollow core door. Should make for things all nice and level. When all is said and done.

At least more level than the floor is likely to be… hence the beauty of those threaded rod holes. I can put on some threaded feed and adjust as needed… or it could be permanently mounted to the floor as well… in the next house, that is.

Next up, leveling and attaching the top… and making shavings baby!

(and brainstorming what to do with those leftoverhardware bits )
Man-O-Man are you gaining on this project, cant wait until it is done to see the final photos!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
stand up

The second piece of old fashioned book binding equipment (nearly 2" thick Maple!) going into this project:



Removing metal hardware before running through the tablesaw. The mortising for it, done almost entirely by drill.



threaded metal rods run through both ends, cross grain. for rigidity? structural integrity? aid in glue up?



Didja guess #2?

Ok, so I knew this one had a split in it, but I didn't know how bad. Luckily the plan was to rip off both edges, like I did with the rails/apron for the top, to use as the feet. Also, luckily, the crack was so close to the middle, allowing for maximum foot depth. I thought I'd have to waste some time to glueing the slab back together, only to rip it apart!

One design consideration was to cut off the ends and join them to the edges for more of an interesting design element… But simplicity and practicality ruled in the end. The legs are splayed 5 degrees, and the feet should probably be as long as possible to match the same offset. from top to floor.

I ripped the feet as wide as possible:





and I still have a rather large piece from the middle of the slab left for another project or two!

I set those down to mark the height to notch out the legs. After already using the table saw to mark the vertical cuts, I finished off with my friend the pullsaw, Then chisel to pop off the waste on one side… a little to aggressive a bite, so I used the pull saw, for both cuts on the other leg. Not too bad, really.









Good fit.



But I think I'd like a bit less offset. Time to dado the feet… but this time, just this once, NOT by hand.

attached & glued.



The legs are indeed clamped to the table - a nice flat torsion box in the (former) guise of a hollow core door. Should make for things all nice and level. When all is said and done.

At least more level than the floor is likely to be… hence the beauty of those threaded rod holes. I can put on some threaded feed and adjust as needed… or it could be permanently mounted to the floor as well… in the next house, that is.

Next up, leveling and attaching the top… and making shavings baby!

(and brainstorming what to do with those leftoverhardware bits )
Makes me wanna get in the shop and play.. Keep on postin…
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,861 Posts
stand up

The second piece of old fashioned book binding equipment (nearly 2" thick Maple!) going into this project:



Removing metal hardware before running through the tablesaw. The mortising for it, done almost entirely by drill.



threaded metal rods run through both ends, cross grain. for rigidity? structural integrity? aid in glue up?



Didja guess #2?

Ok, so I knew this one had a split in it, but I didn't know how bad. Luckily the plan was to rip off both edges, like I did with the rails/apron for the top, to use as the feet. Also, luckily, the crack was so close to the middle, allowing for maximum foot depth. I thought I'd have to waste some time to glueing the slab back together, only to rip it apart!

One design consideration was to cut off the ends and join them to the edges for more of an interesting design element… But simplicity and practicality ruled in the end. The legs are splayed 5 degrees, and the feet should probably be as long as possible to match the same offset. from top to floor.

I ripped the feet as wide as possible:





and I still have a rather large piece from the middle of the slab left for another project or two!

I set those down to mark the height to notch out the legs. After already using the table saw to mark the vertical cuts, I finished off with my friend the pullsaw, Then chisel to pop off the waste on one side… a little to aggressive a bite, so I used the pull saw, for both cuts on the other leg. Not too bad, really.









Good fit.



But I think I'd like a bit less offset. Time to dado the feet… but this time, just this once, NOT by hand.

attached & glued.



The legs are indeed clamped to the table - a nice flat torsion box in the (former) guise of a hollow core door. Should make for things all nice and level. When all is said and done.

At least more level than the floor is likely to be… hence the beauty of those threaded rod holes. I can put on some threaded feed and adjust as needed… or it could be permanently mounted to the floor as well… in the next house, that is.

Next up, leveling and attaching the top… and making shavings baby!

(and brainstorming what to do with those leftoverhardware bits )
It looks like you have everything under control, & will be turning soon!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,659 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Out with the old, in with the,.. well,.. much older.



After the final phase of glue up for the legs, putting the top on was a piece of cake. Clamp, countersink, screw, (so it can be adjusted if ever necessary) and this puppy is ready for work.



Well, it's ready for it's close up,... then work (or play) depending on your perspective.





Goodbye workmate, Hello, nurse!



I left in that metal plate on the ends. For looks and added weight. Plus it makes a handy chisel holder!





As you can see by the outside pic, it is "portable" though somewhat heavy (just like the "mini" lathe perched on it.) Yes they can be moved… but it's better to just leave them be. And while the feet are dead flat and level, the floor is not. Qu'elle surprise. So a teeny shim under one side of a foot is required, until I run out and get some rubber feet I can adjust.

I chucked up a small block and turned it on, and the lathe didn't move at all. Put on this off balanced log and it did. SO, off with the rubber lathe feet and screwed it down with rubber washers and screws. Now, It cannot move!

Well, tell that to the entire stand on the smooth floor!... Vibration, and walking. (Even with me standing on the feet!)

Do I have to rethink the base? Weight it down with some ballast? Should this be dedicated to another tool, while I rethink the lathe stand?

OK, now think for a sec…. The workmate while sturdy, is certainly not nearly as rock solid as this is, and didn't walk around at all, barely shook… What's the difference? Ah, yes the rubber feet. Before I ran out to the BORG, I spotted a bit of leftover shelf liner, (or possibly the anti skid mat you put under a rug)



Cut it in strips, put that down, and rechucked up this off-balanced piece.

YES! No movement at all.

I'm already thrilled with this stand. Unlike the old bench:



(now my table saw's outfeed table) I was using, I can get right up to this one. My feet fit under it, I can get in (safely and comfortably) from the side or the back when working on a bowl, or sanding. A nice, stout and good looking piece of shop furniture. Mostly handmade, entirely built from vintage lumber, for free! (well, not counting the glue and 14 screws)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
Out with the old, in with the,.. well,.. much older.



After the final phase of glue up for the legs, putting the top on was a piece of cake. Clamp, countersink, screw, (so it can be adjusted if ever necessary) and this puppy is ready for work.



Well, it's ready for it's close up,... then work (or play) depending on your perspective.





Goodbye workmate, Hello, nurse!



I left in that metal plate on the ends. For looks and added weight. Plus it makes a handy chisel holder!





As you can see by the outside pic, it is "portable" though somewhat heavy (just like the "mini" lathe perched on it.) Yes they can be moved… but it's better to just leave them be. And while the feet are dead flat and level, the floor is not. Qu'elle surprise. So a teeny shim under one side of a foot is required, until I run out and get some rubber feet I can adjust.

I chucked up a small block and turned it on, and the lathe didn't move at all. Put on this off balanced log and it did. SO, off with the rubber lathe feet and screwed it down with rubber washers and screws. Now, It cannot move!

Well, tell that to the entire stand on the smooth floor!... Vibration, and walking. (Even with me standing on the feet!)

Do I have to rethink the base? Weight it down with some ballast? Should this be dedicated to another tool, while I rethink the lathe stand?

OK, now think for a sec…. The workmate while sturdy, is certainly not nearly as rock solid as this is, and didn't walk around at all, barely shook… What's the difference? Ah, yes the rubber feet. Before I ran out to the BORG, I spotted a bit of leftover shelf liner, (or possibly the anti skid mat you put under a rug)



Cut it in strips, put that down, and rechucked up this off-balanced piece.

YES! No movement at all.

I'm already thrilled with this stand. Unlike the old bench:



(now my table saw's outfeed table) I was using, I can get right up to this one. My feet fit under it, I can get in (safely and comfortably) from the side or the back when working on a bowl, or sanding. A nice, stout and good looking piece of shop furniture. Mostly handmade, entirely built from vintage lumber, for free! (well, not counting the glue and 14 screws)
Nice reclaim, I'd be tempted to finish it with a simple oil finish but it has lasted this long with out it…Great looking stand.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top