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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Assemble the backs part 2..check and check

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Part 2 of assemble the backs. I like to assemble the boards of the backs as a unit, not what the plans call for. This give me the arch and spacing more to my taste and easy to hold the boards for predrilling all screw holes. Only the middle board for the arm attachment do i mark on the back but hold off on drilling until I am sure. With its angled edge there is no correction. Also this has only so much overhang to attach to the ends of the arms in these plans it is easier to remake this board and not remake the arms. So the bottom is an 8 inch by 24. The full length is 36 at the middle and about 33 at the side edges after the cut. So now i see spacing and look. Also the top cross piece is able to be cut to length or width since we are looking at the back of the unit. In PA I liked this better for water runoff, the plans had the bottom board on the front and I saw that as a pocket for water to collect. We are going to mount 2×4 corner blocks inside the frame so this will keep it square and not just screws on the sides to this bottom board and the glue. Another point why my older ones lasted almost 20 years. You can see in this step where you will predrill two screws per board in the top and bottom cross piece. Recheck any for flaws, knots or checks. When i assemble this into the chair frame, I will have the chair sideways and screws ready into the side legs and the arms dry mounted in the front. the back cross board ready to clamp on. Its been over 7 years since i made the last 2 chairs but those short cut steps of working by yourself you learn and don't lose too fast after so many. More sanding and routing to dao and Painting in the slats will be easy not like 1/4 inch slats space.
I like to use a metal 36 in rule for furniture. I also have a 48 in rule for other large work. No mistakes like with a tape measure. both are from HF and worth the cost. For my table saw fence setting I use a metal 12 inch rule since most rip cuts are under 12 inch and I get the accuracy I want. Find a combination square and use it.
 

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Assemble the backs part 2..check and check

Wood Wood stain Plank Boats and boating--Equipment and supplies Floor


Wood Wood stain Plank Hardwood Composite material


Wood Wood stain Flooring Hardwood Plank


Wood Plant Office ruler Wood stain Rectangle


Part 2 of assemble the backs. I like to assemble the boards of the backs as a unit, not what the plans call for. This give me the arch and spacing more to my taste and easy to hold the boards for predrilling all screw holes. Only the middle board for the arm attachment do i mark on the back but hold off on drilling until I am sure. With its angled edge there is no correction. Also this has only so much overhang to attach to the ends of the arms in these plans it is easier to remake this board and not remake the arms. So the bottom is an 8 inch by 24. The full length is 36 at the middle and about 33 at the side edges after the cut. So now i see spacing and look. Also the top cross piece is able to be cut to length or width since we are looking at the back of the unit. In PA I liked this better for water runoff, the plans had the bottom board on the front and I saw that as a pocket for water to collect. We are going to mount 2×4 corner blocks inside the frame so this will keep it square and not just screws on the sides to this bottom board and the glue. Another point why my older ones lasted almost 20 years. You can see in this step where you will predrill two screws per board in the top and bottom cross piece. Recheck any for flaws, knots or checks. When i assemble this into the chair frame, I will have the chair sideways and screws ready into the side legs and the arms dry mounted in the front. the back cross board ready to clamp on. Its been over 7 years since i made the last 2 chairs but those short cut steps of working by yourself you learn and don't lose too fast after so many. More sanding and routing to dao and Painting in the slats will be easy not like 1/4 inch slats space.
I also like to use steel rules in the shop, for layout and machine set up, have a few of each length.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Drill Press mode in a Really really small shed shop...got to see this..

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So this shed shop is 8×16 and The ShopSmith 510 fits many roles here. One comment was what about drill press mode and it was time to drill parallel holes in the two back boards for the back frame. After I marked the boards, i set the table to position, i have the Lift Assist so the piston can raise the motor unit, And the new red castors roll very well. So with the fence ready i rolled the SS into the spot I usually stand at my bench and that's the view you see. Drill press ready with fence to drill two rows of 6 holes in 4 boards from where I stand. Also my view of out the double doors to my backyard. I don't often work with the doors closed even in December, its better to have another layer of sweatshirt or jacket than work in the box. So I clicked the remote for the Dust collector on the motor unit and did the holes in a few moments. A bit of clean up. Unnlocked the wheels. Rolled the SS back into usual place, a quick moment to set up the table saw and ripped the one board to match the other and also cut off about 3 inches. All took about half hour. Now this was 7:30 to 9 am and its fun because at 9 I came in and its already 99 degrees here in July 9th. As i send this, I still have trouble adjusting to not going to my shop just any old time I want like I did in PA. There it is 75 degrees, oh my. I am here to live by my children and this is my world. My SS is a 1980 model-I looked up the numbers-- with many extras, running well. I really am not sure about the upgrade to the PowerPro for the cost but if gifted I would not decline the offer. ( yeah that ain't gonna happen for $2400 ) but who knows. Please keep up reading. I found Norm Abrams Plans…Classics from the NYW have his Adirondack chair is close to my plans if you want patterns, try some used book store or however. Also see his build on utube.
 

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Drill Press mode in a Really really small shed shop...got to see this..

Wood Flooring Hardwood House Shade


Wood Vehicle Motor vehicle Engineering Machine


Wood Automotive design Engineering Machine Toolroom


Wood Automotive design Engineering Machine Toolroom


Motor vehicle Wood Automotive design Engineering Building


So this shed shop is 8×16 and The ShopSmith 510 fits many roles here. One comment was what about drill press mode and it was time to drill parallel holes in the two back boards for the back frame. After I marked the boards, i set the table to position, i have the Lift Assist so the piston can raise the motor unit, And the new red castors roll very well. So with the fence ready i rolled the SS into the spot I usually stand at my bench and that's the view you see. Drill press ready with fence to drill two rows of 6 holes in 4 boards from where I stand. Also my view of out the double doors to my backyard. I don't often work with the doors closed even in December, its better to have another layer of sweatshirt or jacket than work in the box. So I clicked the remote for the Dust collector on the motor unit and did the holes in a few moments. A bit of clean up. Unnlocked the wheels. Rolled the SS back into usual place, a quick moment to set up the table saw and ripped the one board to match the other and also cut off about 3 inches. All took about half hour. Now this was 7:30 to 9 am and its fun because at 9 I came in and its already 99 degrees here in July 9th. As i send this, I still have trouble adjusting to not going to my shop just any old time I want like I did in PA. There it is 75 degrees, oh my. I am here to live by my children and this is my world. My SS is a 1980 model-I looked up the numbers-- with many extras, running well. I really am not sure about the upgrade to the PowerPro for the cost but if gifted I would not decline the offer. ( yeah that ain't gonna happen for $2400 ) but who knows. Please keep up reading. I found Norm Abrams Plans…Classics from the NYW have his Adirondack chair is close to my plans if you want patterns, try some used book store or however. Also see his build on utube.
You have a lot packed in your shop. Nice write up. As for the Shopsmith, it can be a wonderful tool to use for some applications. I do like having mine, but I also like the stand alone tools I have in the shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Stupid Hot and what to do...Sanding of Course

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Imagine a Chilly snowy cold day in February and you just cannot stand another moment of any work outside in the cold, so you head to the shop. IN PHOENIX in July the heat at 9 am was already 100, no humidity so you head to the shop to do what you can and get in some shop time before you are TOAST, my parallel weather to chilly winter and trapped indoors later today when its over 105 at noon what air conditioning in my shop.. October to May is great temperature.
Now I have had 2 great vacations and made slow progress on these chairs, so the arms and legs were ready for sanding. I thought i would show the leg pattern i have in paneling and the two pieces in poplar. Now I changed the arm pattern to have a slight bend and angle to the rear end. So with these pieces already rounded over with the router, this was not a long morning. into the vise and sand away. Now I spend some extra on the front curves of the arms where hands will touch the wood, even painted a bad job is a bad job. This is poplar so the edges worked very nice. So after an hour with the swamp cooler doing its thing, I had all 8 pieces sanded Next steps will be side legs to front cross piece. Check for front corner block. Mark and position front legs. Screws and predrill. We will be using Titebond III so I will do a dry fit then glue and attach. Bolts into the front legs to side legs also. Once at this point check for square and seat height. The leg pattern has hole positions for the screws into the back frame, so that gets pencil marked and later checked when the arms are mounted aligned with the mid cross piece since it bolts and screws to the arms. This is when the moment of assembly gets a bit crazy.
Thanks Hal
 

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Stupid Hot and what to do...Sanding of Course

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Table


Imagine a Chilly snowy cold day in February and you just cannot stand another moment of any work outside in the cold, so you head to the shop. IN PHOENIX in July the heat at 9 am was already 100, no humidity so you head to the shop to do what you can and get in some shop time before you are TOAST, my parallel weather to chilly winter and trapped indoors later today when its over 105 at noon what air conditioning in my shop.. October to May is great temperature.
Now I have had 2 great vacations and made slow progress on these chairs, so the arms and legs were ready for sanding. I thought i would show the leg pattern i have in paneling and the two pieces in poplar. Now I changed the arm pattern to have a slight bend and angle to the rear end. So with these pieces already rounded over with the router, this was not a long morning. into the vise and sand away. Now I spend some extra on the front curves of the arms where hands will touch the wood, even painted a bad job is a bad job. This is poplar so the edges worked very nice. So after an hour with the swamp cooler doing its thing, I had all 8 pieces sanded Next steps will be side legs to front cross piece. Check for front corner block. Mark and position front legs. Screws and predrill. We will be using Titebond III so I will do a dry fit then glue and attach. Bolts into the front legs to side legs also. Once at this point check for square and seat height. The leg pattern has hole positions for the screws into the back frame, so that gets pencil marked and later checked when the arms are mounted aligned with the mid cross piece since it bolts and screws to the arms. This is when the moment of assembly gets a bit crazy.
Thanks Hal
Hot shops aren't much fun. I hate the sweat dripping on my projects (or worse, my tools!!).
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
8 sided miter cuts WOW..Chair almost screwed up...Chair layout

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New miter sled and an Octogon frame test cut lookiing good. I measured 3 inch parts on a 2 inch wide board and had to mark both sides ( they don't tell you that !!!! ) then carefully cut away and it came out like so. this is a rubber band clamp. Very pleased. Now the chair continues. I checked the front legs, picked the better sides and edges for right and left and 2 pair. Also the front cross board, all this to conceal any knots or sap. lets put those where they won't show. And checking the first side leg, I missed cutting the angle on the end.. Now you can see I marked the inset on the front leg and the height for the leg. Also for the 2x corner block. The dots should be screw or bolt holes. I missed cutting off the angled front edge of the 4 legs so that's tomorrow. The larger pic is the layout of the side leg and front leg., more to note here is the mid point where the back comes in and that point is about a foot from table edge--or floor level. This is why these chairs do not sit low like some other Adirondack chairs….14.5 inch at the front and about 12 at the rear of the seat, most others are much lower at both points.
 

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8 sided miter cuts WOW..Chair almost screwed up...Chair layout

Wood Hardwood Flooring Font Wooden block


Wood Wood stain Flooring Floor Red


Wood Wood stain Automotive exterior Hardwood Plywood


New miter sled and an Octogon frame test cut lookiing good. I measured 3 inch parts on a 2 inch wide board and had to mark both sides ( they don't tell you that !!!! ) then carefully cut away and it came out like so. this is a rubber band clamp. Very pleased. Now the chair continues. I checked the front legs, picked the better sides and edges for right and left and 2 pair. Also the front cross board, all this to conceal any knots or sap. lets put those where they won't show. And checking the first side leg, I missed cutting the angle on the end.. Now you can see I marked the inset on the front leg and the height for the leg. Also for the 2x corner block. The dots should be screw or bolt holes. I missed cutting off the angled front edge of the 4 legs so that's tomorrow. The larger pic is the layout of the side leg and front leg., more to note here is the mid point where the back comes in and that point is about a foot from table edge--or floor level. This is why these chairs do not sit low like some other Adirondack chairs….14.5 inch at the front and about 12 at the rear of the seat, most others are much lower at both points.
Looks like you did well with the sled for segments. And now you moving along with the chair.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Assembully 101 chair frame and my workbench

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Hi welcome to a big step in the build. All that precut and premarking made today go fast in the hour of heat by 9:30 am. Today is a dry fit matching parts and checking before i glue with Titebond III. Its been a few years and I am looking at the plans but no mistakes even with coffee to help So you can see the side legs were trimmed at the front edge…that was the last blog…I cut 4 corners this morning on the new sled. Picked the matching legs and corner blocks. Predrilled with a brad point bit since this is hidden inside the frame. Today you can see the corner block and room for a bolt, I think that will keep the front leg to side leg stronger over the years. Also the wood clamps to be my extra hands. My bench is 29 inch wide, I used to think that 24 inch was perfect until I tried a few Adirondack chairs. Even in my other shops I never had room for a large assembly table. Above the bench is a cubby for 4 sanders, portables on top, batteries, etc. The drill holders I made last year and like them. I predrilled the front board and added the screws since by myself I had the ability to get the screws into the ends while balancing the corner and holding the 2×4 corner block. Anything helps. I show the side leg pattern and a ruler to show the seat height I have been talking about and will now stop nagging about that. Go sit in some other Adirondack.
 

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Assembully 101 chair frame and my workbench

Wood Tree Table Wood stain Floor


Wood Electrical wiring Gas Machine Shelving


Wood Automotive design Hardwood Engineering Flooring


Wood Wood stain Table Hardwood Flooring


Wood Tool Flooring Hardwood Shelf


Hi welcome to a big step in the build. All that precut and premarking made today go fast in the hour of heat by 9:30 am. Today is a dry fit matching parts and checking before i glue with Titebond III. Its been a few years and I am looking at the plans but no mistakes even with coffee to help So you can see the side legs were trimmed at the front edge…that was the last blog…I cut 4 corners this morning on the new sled. Picked the matching legs and corner blocks. Predrilled with a brad point bit since this is hidden inside the frame. Today you can see the corner block and room for a bolt, I think that will keep the front leg to side leg stronger over the years. Also the wood clamps to be my extra hands. My bench is 29 inch wide, I used to think that 24 inch was perfect until I tried a few Adirondack chairs. Even in my other shops I never had room for a large assembly table. Above the bench is a cubby for 4 sanders, portables on top, batteries, etc. The drill holders I made last year and like them. I predrilled the front board and added the screws since by myself I had the ability to get the screws into the ends while balancing the corner and holding the 2×4 corner block. Anything helps. I show the side leg pattern and a ruler to show the seat height I have been talking about and will now stop nagging about that. Go sit in some other Adirondack.
You are moving along. When working by yourself, we come up with some ingenious ideas to assist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Tuesday...Chair And Shop Tour Tuesday

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First, we glued and screwed the seat frame from yesterday with Titebond III. New to me and its a bit more runny thaAn I expected. I chose the seat boards and arranged as I wanted to hide any knots or cracks. The plans call for narrow boards but I am doing 3.5 inch so only using 5. the plans would use 8 even with the gap. At the front leg board 2 is notched around the back of the leg. Now on to most of the Shop 16 foot wall in these pics. The extra wood for back slats-2 chairs-is against my planer and miter saw in a flip over stand, behind them is my clamp rack. to the left is a BD Workmate for outside work. Along the wall I have shelves for stains and above them more space for the next seat boards and the brackets for the arms. This is across from the Shopsmith. At the Middle is a clock I made from a steel saw blade with stick on numbers. and the start of the french cleat wall across from my bench. Opposite my bench is a craftsman tool chest with 4 inch sander and bench drill press. Also the junk on the Cleats.
At the 8 foot end is a mix of bins for screws, more assorted parts for projects, all this on 2×4 that span the Shed. Underneath are 2 shelf units for portables and more portables under my workbench. i have a stool that is in the way and sometimes I want to put it out. My trash can is under the vise of the workbench and I have had it there for lyears. Hope you like the short tour.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Half a chair, do unto another and Shop Tip I learned at Class

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Today is glue and screw the seat boards. I almost messed up with holes marked over the side legs and seat boards not rounded over. Got to check those parts before assembled. Predrilled the holes on the small drill press. Next sanded the brackets for the arm rests, OOOPs , found that 2 of 4, we are making 2 chairs were not square on the top so more sanding with stationary sander. Now do to another. I was marking the center of the front upright legs for the holes and remembered to grab the other pair for chair 2. so now those are pencil marked. It does help to make 2 at a time. Predrilled and screwed the brackets, then went back and unscrewed and glued and screwed. this is not a clampable position so the predrill helped with holes when i had glue and parts could move. Drill bits are my BRAD POINT bits stored in a wood block and marked with a sharpie. SHOP TIP while at a class at Woodworkers Source the leader showed using a 90% angle plate to transfer lines around a board. Now I found this very useful in this build and so easy to keep one or two around my tools. just big enough to go around the edge and down the side, easy to hold and not going to move, cost about 69 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Half a chair, do unto another and Shop Tip I learned at Class

Wood Building Interior design Floor House


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Today is glue and screw the seat boards. I almost messed up with holes marked over the side legs and seat boards not rounded over. Got to check those parts before assembled. Predrilled the holes on the small drill press. Next sanded the brackets for the arm rests, OOOPs , found that 2 of 4, we are making 2 chairs were not square on the top so more sanding with stationary sander. Now do to another. I was marking the center of the front upright legs for the holes and remembered to grab the other pair for chair 2. so now those are pencil marked. It does help to make 2 at a time. Predrilled and screwed the brackets, then went back and unscrewed and glued and screwed. this is not a clampable position so the predrill helped with holes when i had glue and parts could move. Drill bits are my BRAD POINT bits stored in a wood block and marked with a sharpie. SHOP TIP while at a class at Woodworkers Source the leader showed using a 90% angle plate to transfer lines around a board. Now I found this very useful in this build and so easy to keep one or two around my tools. just big enough to go around the edge and down the side, easy to hold and not going to move, cost about 69 cents.
Later today. I moved ahead on chair 2 and glued the front and side legs together to set overnight. So all that prep can speed up the same frame assembly when I find some room for parts.
Next step will be assemble the back as a unit and that was in an earlier blog layout the pieces and trim the top curve and the bottom board drill the screw holes. Did that for both chairs also. Two at once is not so bad.
 

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Half a chair, do unto another and Shop Tip I learned at Class

Wood Building Interior design Floor House


Wood Wood stain Art Table Hardwood


Table Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Today is glue and screw the seat boards. I almost messed up with holes marked over the side legs and seat boards not rounded over. Got to check those parts before assembled. Predrilled the holes on the small drill press. Next sanded the brackets for the arm rests, OOOPs , found that 2 of 4, we are making 2 chairs were not square on the top so more sanding with stationary sander. Now do to another. I was marking the center of the front upright legs for the holes and remembered to grab the other pair for chair 2. so now those are pencil marked. It does help to make 2 at a time. Predrilled and screwed the brackets, then went back and unscrewed and glued and screwed. this is not a clampable position so the predrill helped with holes when i had glue and parts could move. Drill bits are my BRAD POINT bits stored in a wood block and marked with a sharpie. SHOP TIP while at a class at Woodworkers Source the leader showed using a 90% angle plate to transfer lines around a board. Now I found this very useful in this build and so easy to keep one or two around my tools. just big enough to go around the edge and down the side, easy to hold and not going to move, cost about 69 cents.
Nice little tip about the 90 deg angle.

You chairs are coming together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Great morning building more..and more by 9 am.

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Up and at em by 7:30.. fans on. So I put together to leg set for chair 2 front leg to side leg with screws. also predrilled the holes for the arm brackets and the holes for the front board. I did not mount the board in place or would have run out of room today. But working on the two back frame pieces gave me lots of space. So you can see the slat spacing and top cross piece and bottom larger piece. The mid piece I learned to work last as it mounts to the back of the arms so fitting it later and screw holes is a custom fit.It has a bevel cut to hold the back. Also gave me the chance to look over the slats as this is a show off part and sand off errors. In the plans they want you to do this one by one with the chair upriight, and i found that a bit tedious and not see the big picture of the curve. Also cut that curve is easier not in the air. So with the bench clean. AHHH. Then a pic of parts done today. 2 back frames, leg set for chair 2, and the first chair outdoors--I even gave it a test sitting, very good. The chairs will be a white paint to hold up in the sunshine under my back patio. Not in the sunshine, so i am working on long life here.
 

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Great morning building more..and more by 9 am.

Handheld power drill Pneumatic tool Wood Hammer drill Drill


Plant Wood Hardwood Wood stain Beam


Table Wood Floor Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring Lumber


Wood Outdoor furniture Grass Rectangle Road surface


Up and at em by 7:30.. fans on. So I put together to leg set for chair 2 front leg to side leg with screws. also predrilled the holes for the arm brackets and the holes for the front board. I did not mount the board in place or would have run out of room today. But working on the two back frame pieces gave me lots of space. So you can see the slat spacing and top cross piece and bottom larger piece. The mid piece I learned to work last as it mounts to the back of the arms so fitting it later and screw holes is a custom fit.It has a bevel cut to hold the back. Also gave me the chance to look over the slats as this is a show off part and sand off errors. In the plans they want you to do this one by one with the chair upriight, and i found that a bit tedious and not see the big picture of the curve. Also cut that curve is easier not in the air. So with the bench clean. AHHH. Then a pic of parts done today. 2 back frames, leg set for chair 2, and the first chair outdoors--I even gave it a test sitting, very good. The chairs will be a white paint to hold up in the sunshine under my back patio. Not in the sunshine, so i am working on long life here.
That is looking good, I like the higher seat, easier to get out if I would think. And the gentle slope of the back instead of the curved ones. Well done.
 

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